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FWSAR (CC130H, Buffalo, C27J, V22): Status & Possibilities

suffolkowner

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kev994

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I think the location on the island is much better. I’d like to back that up with some data, but I think it’s safe to say a majority of calls are closer to the more populate areas and waterways .
In the COA stage the rumoured number that was being tossed around off the top of my head was something like 90% of the cases were within 150 NM of Comox. OTOH there’s less thinking involved to launching an airplane when it’s so close, ie I don’t know if there’s more or less consideration given to other assets when the professional asset is that close.
 

SeaKingTacco

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In the COA stage the rumoured number that was being tossed around off the top of my head was something like 90% of the cases were within 150 NM of Comox. OTOH there’s less thinking involved to launching an airplane when it’s so close, ie I don’t know if there’s more or less consideration given to other assets when the professional asset is that close.
There are just more cases around southern Vancouver Island. I personally responded to a SAR a day, three days running once, and I was not even primary SAR.
 

YZT580

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You could separate the SAR budget out but I dont see the net gain for the CAF. The CAF budget would just be smaller
Shouldn't affect the overall budget one iota. Would just move SAR, equipment, personnel (seconded from CAF), training, operations onto its own line in the budget but the sum would be the same. It would also mean that when budget cuts come, Transport wouldn't have to slice and dice elsewhere in order to maintain the SAR budget which cannot effectively be reduced at all.
 

Colin Parkinson

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There are just more cases around southern Vancouver Island. I personally responded to a SAR a day, three days running once, and I was not even primary SAR.
On the old SRN 6 Hovercraft supoorting the herring roe fleet off of Comox, I got to deal with 3 separate hand/finger amputations and a heart attack in about 2 hrs. A lot of things can happen concurrently in the South Coast Region. The synergy between the SAR Techs, CCG and USCCG was pretty awesome.
 

daftandbarmy

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Make it revenue neutral, and start charging stupid people for saving their lives.

North Shore GSAR enters the chat....

They're strongly opposed to charging for rescue ostensibly to make sure that more lives are saved, but also to avoid risk to volunteers and aircraft etc trying to find people who get really, really lost and/or injured because they're trying to avoid paying for rescue.

 

dapaterson

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Knowing that "Oh, if the swell gets too bad when I'm out in my canoe, and they launch a helicopter to save my sorry unfit ass, it's going to cost me $100K" might just deter a few stupid people.
 

daftandbarmy

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Knowing that "Oh, if the swell gets too bad when I'm out in my canoe, and they launch a helicopter to save my sorry unfit ass, it's going to cost me $100K" might just deter a few stupid people.

If you look at the people saved by NS Rescue which, I think, is the busiest SAR team in North America (someone will correct me now) many 'rescuees' looks like they just stepped out of Metrotown Mall.

I've seen crowds of these people following well trodden paths, set earlier by properly equipped back country travellers, in the snow right through steep avalanche terrain wearing thousand dollar running shoes, stylish jeans and 'gangsta' jackets. My main goal is to avoid them (I'll usually be on backcountry skis wearing an avvie beacon and carrying the essentials) so they don't trigger an avalanche on me. I've tried to turn some back e.g., "you know, if you step off this track you'll be up to your waist in snow" but they usually think I'm just being a jerk.

I've often wondered why SAR doesn't station 'helpful and informative' volunteers at the easier backcountry access points that see the most traffic, like Mt Seymour, Grouse Mountain and Cypress Mountain, to deter the poorly equipped from venturing further than the edge of the pavement. Maybe they do that and I missed it...
 

Kirkhill

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If you look at the people saved by NS Rescue which, I think, is the busiest SAR team in North America (someone will correct me now) many 'rescuees' looks like they just stepped out of Metrotown Mall.

I've seen crowds of these people following well trodden paths, set earlier by properly equipped back country travellers, in the snow right through steep avalanche terrain wearing thousand dollar running shoes, stylish jeans and 'gangsta' jackets. My main goal is to avoid them (I'll usually be on backcountry skis wearing an avvie beacon and carrying the essentials) so they don't trigger an avalanche on me. I've tried to turn some back e.g., "you know, if you step off this track you'll be up to your waist in snow" but they usually think I'm just being a jerk.

I've often wondered why SAR doesn't station 'helpful and informative' volunteers at the easier backcountry access points that see the most traffic, like Mt Seymour, Grouse Mountain and Cypress Mountain, to deter the poorly equipped from venturing further than the edge of the pavement. Maybe they do that and I missed it...
Sounds like it should be covered by the BC Tourism budget.
 
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