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Active Shooter In NS. April 19 2020

mariomike

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post-auction police cruiser;
Funny how people can buy used emergency vehicles at auction, when it is impossible to buy a used UPS "Package Car" for any amount of money. Their rule is simple: When UPS is done with them, they scrap every one.

Our department operated a fleet of Crown Victoria Police Interceptors. All were white. Some were marked, some were not.

They were chosen for their acceleration, good weight distribution, handling, and traction. Idled without over heating. Had a fairly tight turning radius in city traffic. Roomy trunk for equipment (with some interesting features inside ). They took a lot of punishment ( curbs, mostly ) .

Eventually all went to public auction.
 

PuckChaser

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Government always trying to make money, without context on public safety issues.

I would suspect UPS puts so many miles on their vehicles that they're worth more scrapped for steel than as an actual serviceable vehicle.
 

Eaglelord17

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Well there is no reason Government property shouldn't be sold off to the public, it belongs to the public in the first place and provided there isn't some overarching danger to it (such as the vehicle is illegal for road usage such as a ML) recouping some funds by a private sale is a great thing. Punish people who do criminal acts not pre-emptively attempting to control everyone due to what someone 'might do'.
 

Haggis

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Well there is no reason Government property shouldn't be sold off to the public, it belongs to the public in the first place and provided there isn't some overarching danger to it (such as the vehicle is illegal for road usage such as a ML) recouping some funds by a private sale is a great thing.
Like selling off "lightly" used Browning High Powers to licenced collectors?
Punish people who do criminal acts not pre-emptively attempting to control everyone due to what someone 'might do'.
Welcome to the world of lawful gun ownership in Canada. 😁
 

mariomike

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In today's news, for reference to the discussion,


By The Canadian Press
Thu., Jan. 21, 2021

Nova Scotia working on legislation to regulate sale of used police vehicles​


"Furey said there are no plans to ban the sale of decommissioned police vehicles despite calls by the Opposition Progressive Conservatives to prohibit those sales."
 

lenaitch

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Despite the fact that they are provincially registered, it will interesting to see how they come up with legislation that tried to regulate the disposal of federal property.

From outward appearances, a used white Ford Taurus is a used white Ford Taurus. Besides, where will all the taxis get their fleet? Seeing as all the livery is stripped before sale, they might have better luck regulating graphics shops.
 

Eaglelord17

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Like selling off "lightly" used Browning High Powers to licenced collectors?

Welcome to the world of lawful gun ownership in Canada. 😁
Especially considering the fact you can already buy Browning Hi-Powers (even made by Inglis which are exactly the same as the CF ones) civvy side
Despite the fact that they are provincially registered, it will interesting to see how they come up with legislation that tried to regulate the disposal of federal property.

From outward appearances, a used white Ford Taurus is a used white Ford Taurus. Besides, where will all the taxis get their fleet? Seeing as all the livery is stripped before sale, they might have better luck regulating graphics shops.
They would be better off banning jerry cans as I understand it the shooter did more damage with those than any cop car.
 

dapaterson

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There are extant laws against personation of peace officers. I am not a lawyer, but I suspect these issues (if they are significant) can be addressed through law we already have, rather than creating new, narrow, confusing laws.
 

PuckChaser

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There are extant laws against personation of peace officers. I am not a lawyer, but I suspect these issues (if they are significant) can be addressed through law we already have, rather than creating new, narrow, confusing laws.
You mean like banning guns because people shoot other people with them, even though murder is already illegal?
 

NavyShooter

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However, in the interests of being seen to "DO SOMETHING" the Government will, no doubt, ban the sale of former police cars....even though it's not an actual solution to the real problem...
 

mariomike

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It seems that every area I worked in there was some numpty who drove a post-auction police cruiser; perhaps sticking a CB antenna back in the hole. I suppose it gave them jollies, figured it helped them in traffic or felt they were 'helping'. Most were losers.
I agree. But, if someone has their heart set on buying that type of vehicle, they should shy away from those used on Operations. They were treated like rented mules.

On the other hand, higher ups in the emergency services, at least in Toronto, had "company cars". They were "taxable benefits" for home and cottage. As they were considered to be "on call" 24/7. Especially after 9/11.

Those cars were treated with TLC by the emergency vehicle technicians.

If a buyer looking for that type of car at auction could find one of those , they could get a well maintained one at a good price.
 

lenaitch

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I agree. But, if someone has their heart set on buying that type of vehicle, they should shy away from those used on Operations. They were treated like rented mules.

On the other hand, higher ups in the emergency services, at least in Toronto, had "company cars". They were "taxable benefits" for home and cottage. As they were considered to be "on call" 24/7. Especially after 9/11.

Those cars were treated with TLC by the emergency vehicle technicians.

If a buyer looking for that type of car at auction could find one of those , they could get a well maintained one at a good price.

Yup. If I was ever in the mood, their were a few that, could I have tracked the VIN, would have been a decent purchase; usually unmarked.

On that note:


If such a policy holds for the long term, both for the feds and municipal/provincial, they'll have to deal with the loss of revenue stream and the environmental impact of sending them to the crusher. Only so many can be re-cycled to other government departments as 'admin' vehicles.

Those so inclined can still buy a similar used model on the open market and trick it out.
 

Haggis

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However, in the interests of being seen to "DO SOMETHING" the Government will, no doubt, ban the sale of former police cars....even though it's not an actual solution to the real problem...
That didn't take long. Faster than a gun ban! So it shall be written. So it shall be done!
 

lenaitch

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That didn't take long. Faster than a gun ban! So it shall be written. So it shall be done!
I saw somebody interviewed on CTV Atlantic that maybe they could sell them to smaller municipal departments. 'Sure, we'll buy your clapped out junk'. Perhaps a slight tweaking of the CC 'Personate a Peace Officer' to include 'being in possession' of equipment might do it.

This will do nothing. The one in Antigonish wasn't even marked. I can still buy a white sedan or black SUV on the open market.
 

mariomike

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It became less significant during the period when the Force went to all-white cars.
From black and white to white then back to black and white.

In the municipality I live, not so long ago police cars were school bus yellow. Then grey stealth. Looks like they are going back to white. For now.
 

OldSolduer

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From black and white to white then back to black and white.

In the municipality I live, not so long ago police cars were school bus yellow. Then grey stealth. Looks like they are going back to white. For now.
Its probably cheaper to have an all white factory paint job. The rifle green DND vans we had in the 70s cost extra to paint plus the fee to remove the AM radios.
 

lenaitch

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From black and white to white then back to black and white.

In the municipality I live, not so long ago police cars were school bus yellow. Then grey stealth. Looks like they are going back to white. For now.

I was part of that project. We went white because Ford and GM said they were dropping two-tone as a production option and we didn't have the desire or capacity to do it in-house. A few years later Ford was willing to bring it back. Initially, GM/Chrysler black and whites were actually a white vinyl wrap - I don't know if that is still the case. Originally, the Force owned the white paint code but when B&W was revived they went with OEM white - you call tell if different makes are parked together.

Toronto's (and other municipals) yellow was dropped by the manufacturers because of lead content. The grey caused a bit of an uproar because it looked too 'mean'.

Its probably cheaper to have an all white factory paint job. The rifle green DND vans we had in the 70s cost extra to paint plus the fee to remove the AM radios.

I no longer know the cost issue but it isn't huge on a large fleet order. The don't do a re-paint'; colour-wise they are sold as-is. The tried painting the doors black for a while but the cost of keeping the paint shop wasn't worth it just for that (they have one for fabrications; otherwise, all body work is commercial). They used to get a 'delete-credit' for radios. When the manufacturers dropped the credit, the members got radios.
 

Halifax Tar

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You know there are tow facets to this.

1) The government(s) wants to be seen to have done something even if reactively. Now they can stand up and they have taken action in hopes of stopping this from ever happening again. This wins votes with the perpetually scared and uneducated.

2) The perpetually scared and uneducated public scream for something to be done after the fact. And its much easier to legislate away property and property rights than to table a budget and corresponding legislation that address the root causes of violence in our country.

Voila everyone feels better.

Welcome to Firearms Regulation in Canada.

For the sake of my position I lost two friends to this maniac. But I know the system didn't fail when he bought a police car and guns. It failed when our existing laws were not enforced and through the inept actions of our Policing leadership once the scenario was afoot.
 
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