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Snowbird Jet Crashes Into House in Kamloops- May 17 2020

PuckChaser

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CBC asked a former Snowbirds Team Lead to analyze the video. He seemed very careful not to speculate on any causes, but the video angle does show a black speck in the sky moving towards the A/C just before Rich pitched up. You can also see when they slow the video down (this isn't mentioned) that whoever the first ejection was had their parachute at least partially deploying in fairly rapid order. The 2nd ejection is out of focus so you cannot see if there is a parachute opening sequence as quickly as the first.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGS3dmuPlPo
 

daftandbarmy

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PuckChaser said:
CBC asked a former Snowbirds Team Lead to analyze the video. He seemed very careful not to speculate on any causes, but the video angle does show a black speck in the sky moving towards the A/C just before Rich pitched up. You can also see when they slow the video down (this isn't mentioned) that whoever the first ejection was had their parachute at least partially deploying in fairly rapid order. The 2nd ejection is out of focus so you cannot see if there is a parachute opening sequence as quickly as the first.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGS3dmuPlPo

Bird strike.... mentioned in this article as a possibility:

“However, again, the investigation will prove whether it was a bird strike or an engine failure or some sort of other emergency,” Stephenson said.

https://globalnews.ca/news/6954775/cf-snowbird-crashes-near-kamloops-during-b-c-stop-of-cross-canada-tour/
 

CF_Pilot

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NavyShooter said:
An analysis by a former Snowbird pilot:

https://youtu.be/Xl7qOY2-o_Y
Much better analysis here, where he points out the stall/spin not seen by former Snowbirds:

https://youtu.be/10Og_7sqU7s


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

Privateer

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Mods, perhaps this goes to Thoughts and Prayers?

Captain Richard MacDougall: Injured pilot makes first public appearance

per: CFJC today: https://cfjctoday.com/2020/05/22/injured-pilot-makes-first-public-appearance/?fbclid=IwAR3qDCpsf1Tj7zGIcqDMk6KsghqydPwiz1khej5XGooymvMAfPUMuhm3Umw

KAMLOOPS — Injured pilot Captain Richard MacDougall came out in public last night for the first time since the tragic Snowbirds’ accident Sunday.

Members of the local indigenous community performed a drum circle at the roundabout in front of the admitting entrance to the hospital last night. MacDougall, surrounded by family members, well-blanketed and in his wheelchair, came out of the entrance to watch the circle and thank the members of the First Nations community for their support and prayers.

There has been little released about MacDougall’s injuries or the long-term prognosis for his recovery, but last night he appeared in good spirits for his visit outside.

Photos at link.
 

MilEME09

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https://www.thestar.com/amp/news/canada/2020/05/29/snowbirds-were-waiting-for-new-ejection-seats-before-deadly-crash-now-dnd-wont-say-if-gear-was-replaced.html

While there is a bit of speculation in the article, the department seems tight lipped on the issue of the ejection seat, and its replacement.
 

PuckChaser

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MilEME09 said:
While there is a bit of speculation in the article, the department seems tight lipped on the issue of the ejection seat, and its replacement.

I'm still a little surprised the media has picked up that Strong, Secure, Engaged cancelled the Snowbird replacement project in favour of a life extension. Both projects weren't going to deliver by the proposed retirement date of 2020, but at least we'd be getting new airframes in 2026 instead of bandaids completed in 2025. Either DND determined we could keep flying them, or politically someone didn't want to spend $1.5B CAD when they could appear to be doing something with a paltry $100M CAD.

http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/business-defence-acquisition-guide-2015/aerospace-systems-347.page Snowbird Aircraft Replacement
http://dgpaapp.forces.gc.ca/en/defence-capabilities-blueprint/project-details.asp?id=1438 Snowbird Beyond 2020 LE
 

Quirky

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MilEME09 said:
https://www.thestar.com/amp/news/canada/2020/05/29/snowbirds-were-waiting-for-new-ejection-seats-before-deadly-crash-now-dnd-wont-say-if-gear-was-replaced.html

While there is a bit of speculation in the article, the department seems tight lipped on the issue of the ejection seat, and its replacement.

Or lack thereof. Isn’t hard to compare stock photos of the Weber CL-41 to recent pics, look to be identical. If the engineering is too complex to fit a modern zero-zero seat, that’s one thing. If it’s simply a cost saving tactic not to spend the money, considering the low-level aerobatic performances of the team, it just goes to you how much they value the lives of the aircrew. Still wearing a parachute on your back and waiting for the canopy to open wastes precious seconds, time you don’t have if you punch out low and slow. Let’s hope this incident fast tracks either an upgrade to the ejection seat or airframe itself if the Snowbirds are to continue performing.

Prelim report is out:

http://www.rcaf-arc.forces.gc.ca/en/flight-safety/article-template-flight-safety.page?doc=ct114161-tutor-from-the-investigator/kae62tqg

On 17 May 2020 the Snowbirds air demonstration team was scheduled to depart Kamloops, BC to reposition to Comox, BC as part of Operation INSPIRATION, an operation undertaken by 431 (AD) Sqn to travel around multiple sites across Canada to support COVID-19 front line workers. Aircraft CT114161 was #2 of a formation of two CT114 Tutor aircraft. Two occupants were on board the aircraft, the pilot and the team’s public affairs officer.

After take-off aircraft CT114161 was observed gaining altitude and departing the formation. Shortly thereafter, the aircraft initiated a left turn, followed shortly by an abrupt steep nose low attitude. Both occupants subsequently ejected from the aircraft.

A detailed analysis of video footage recovered for the investigation revealed one bird in very close proximity to the aircraft right engine intake (see red circle in picture above) during the critical phase of take-off.

The two occupants ejected the aircraft however one received serious injuries and the other received fatal injuries. The aircraft was destroyed on impact.

The investigation is focusing on environmental factors (birdstrike) as well as the performance of the escape system.

 

Drallib

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Bird strike on Snowbird engine likely caused fatal crash: report


Canadian air force crash investigators are looking at a bird strike as the probable cause of the crash of a Snowbird demonstration jet in Kamloops, British Columbia last month.

The accident killed Capt. Jenn Casey, the public affairs officer for the aerobatics team.


In a preliminary report issued Monday, investigators say video footage from the crash showed a bird was in very close proximity to the right engine intake during take-off.

It's possible the bird struck the engine's intake, the report suggested.

The jet was climbing at the time, but then turned and went into a steep nose dive before hitting the ground in a residential neighbourhood.

Both Casey and the pilot, Capt. Richard MacDougall, ejected.

The aircraft was destroyed on impact.

"The investigation is focusing on environmental factors (birdstrike) as well as the performance of the escape system," said the report.

MacDougall was injured, but is expected to make a full recovery. The investigation is ongoing and it could be months before a final verdict on the exact cause of the accident is issued.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/snowbird-crash-report-1.5593259
 

Drallib

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Directorate of Flight Safety Releases Initial Report on CF Snowbirds Accident

The Department of National Defence’s Airworthiness Investigative Authority has issued a preliminary From the Investigator (FTI) report in relation to the Snowbirds accident in Kamloops on May 17, 2020. That accident claimed the life of the team’s Public Affairs Officer, Captain Jennifer Casey.

The FTI report is a brief summary of the circumstances and factual information known at this time. It does not provide full details surrounding the accident, but rather indicates the areas of focus for the investigation, which remains underway.

A detailed analysis of video footage recovered for the investigation revealed one bird in very close proximity to the aircraft right engine intake during the critical post take-off phase. The flight safety investigation will focus on environmental factors (the bird strike) and the performance of the escape system, as is the case in all accidents involving ejections.

“Our thoughts remain with Captain Jenn Casey’s family, the Snowbirds, and the Public Affairs Branch. I’m relieved to see that Captain Richard MacDougall has returned home and we wish him well in his continued recovery. To the City of Kamloops, the first responders, and the surrounding communities, you have shown our RCAF family the goodness of your hearts. We will not forget your support and kindness – my sincerest thanks. The Snowbirds continue to represent the professionalism, discipline and sense of team that are hallmarks of our institution. We are committed to safely returning them to the skies in due course.” Lieutenant General Al Meinzinger, Commander Royal Canadian Air Force

“During any Flight Safety investigation, we focus on completing a thorough, accurate and professional investigation. While we might quickly understand what happened in an accident, the most difficult work of an investigation begins as we peel back the layers to understand why and how this happened. We are laser-focused to understanding everything we can about the accident so we can recommend effective preventative measures to help reduce the risk of future occurrences.” Colonel John Alexander, Director of Flight Safety and Department of National Defence’s Airworthiness Investigative Authority

ADDITIONAL INFO

Flight Safety Investigations are conducted to ensure our personnel can continue to have confidence in our equipment and procedures. One of the aims of the Flight Safety program is to investigate such occurrences with the objective of quickly identifying effective preventive measures that will either prevent or reduce the risk of similar occurrences in the future.

The Canadian Forces Snowbirds were deployed on Operation INSPIRATION, a cross-Canada tour to lift the spirits of Canadians and salute front-line workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. Operation INSPIRATION has been delayed indefinitely.

The CT-114 Tutor fleet has been on an operational pause, which is a temporary cessation of flying operations, since the accident occurred. The RCAF is conducting a thorough risk assessment, with the goal of returning the fleet to flying operations. The aircraft will remain in Kamloops until that established process has been completed.

http://www.canadiandefencereview.com/news?news/2868
 

Drallib

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RCAF’s CT-114 Tutors back in the air

The Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) fleet of CT-114 Tutors is back in the air, following a “thorough technical and operational risk analysis” in the wake of two serious accidents within an eight-month period.

On Aug. 24, the commander of 2 Canadian Air Division, BGen Denis O’Reilly, lifted an operational pause that had been in effect since a fatal May 17 crash in Kamloops, B.C. That accident claimed the life of Capt Jennifer Casey, public affairs officer for the Canadian Forces Snowbirds.

Casey was riding in the team’s No. 11 jet alongside pilot Capt Richard MacDougall, who sustained serious but non life-threatening injuries.

The Snowbirds team was in B.C. as part of Operation Inspiration, their cross-country tour saluting Canadians’ efforts to combat the coronavirus pandemic.

The CT-114 Tutor – first acquired by the RCAF in 1963 – is operated by the Snowbirds at 15 Wing Moose Jaw, Sask., and the Aerospace Engineering Test Establishment at 4 Wing Cold Lake, Alta. The RCAF’s primary jet trainer until 2000, a total of 23 Tutors remain in the fleet.

In addition to the May 17 accident, another CT-114 crashed near Atlanta, Ga., on Oct. 13, 2019. The pilot, Capt Kevin Domon-Grenier, received minor injuries. He successfully ejected from the aircraft after experiencing a loss of thrust, but later reported “anomalies” with the ejection sequence and parachute opening. The aircraft was destroyed upon impact.

The subsequent investigation by the military’s Directorate of Flight Safety (DFS) zeroed in on a fuel delivery system failure within the Tutor’s engine, probably at the engine oil cooler fuel inlet port.

Investigators also determined that the “mostly likely cause of the parachute malfunction was the result of one or more parachute pack retaining cones having been released prior to the activation of the MK10B Automatic Opening Device.” Suspension lines became entangled with parts of the ejection seat, impacting proper parachute deployment.

Following the report, the RCAF inspected all related Tutor Aviation Life Support Equipment to ensure airworthiness. The DFS also recommended CT-114 engine inspections and changes to associated procedures, in order to identify damaged oil coolers that may be at risk of leaking.

A preliminary report for the fatal Kamloops accident was issued on June 1. It indicated that those investigators are focusing on environmental factors (a possible bird strike) and the performance of the aircraft emergency egress system. While operations are now resuming, the Tutor fleet will be subject to a series of risk mitigation measures, including some restrictions on flying operations and a focus on increased maintenance.

Experts continue to evaluate the May accident; when their analysis is complete, the RCAF will determine whether any additional measures are required to ensure safe operations.

Back to Moose Jaw
The Snowbirds’ CT-114 Tutors, grounded in Kamloops since May 17, will return to the team’s home base at 15 Wing Moose Jaw over the next two weeks.

The remainder of the team’s 2020 season – along with Operation Inspiration – have been officially cancelled.

https://www.skiesmag.com/news/rcaf-ct-114-tutor-back-air/?utm_source=skies-daily-news-top-story&utm_campaign=skies-daily-news&utm_medium=email&utm_term=top-story&utm_content=V1
 

suffolkowner

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What is the path forward?

Elimination of the Snowbirds?
Accelerated new aircraft for the Snowbirds? Like any of the T-X candidates?
Modernization of the Tutors? New ejections seats?
Transition to another platform currently in use by the RCAF like the CT-155 Hawk or CT-156 Harvard II

This is not a new problem. People shouldn't have to die to push a procurement file forward
 

daftandbarmy

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What is the path forward?

Elimination of the Snowbirds?
Accelerated new aircraft for the Snowbirds? Like any of the T-X candidates?
Modernization of the Tutors? New ejections seats?
Transition to another platform currently in use by the RCAF like the CT-155 Hawk or CT-156 Harvard II

This is not a new problem. People shouldn't have to die to push a procurement file forward

Install 'Zero-Zero' seats, like this Russian Backfire Bomber didn't have last week?

 

SupersonicMax

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Quirky

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What is the path forward?

Elimination of the Snowbirds?
Accelerated new aircraft for the Snowbirds? Like any of the T-X candidates?
Modernization of the Tutors? New ejections seats?
Transition to another platform currently in use by the RCAF like the CT-155 Hawk or CT-156 Harvard II

This is not a new problem. People shouldn't have to die to push a procurement file forward

I'd imagine snowbird replacement will happen after the new Fighter jet is picked. They'll likely just buy an extra dozen or so T-X trainers and paint them snowbird colours.

Snowbirds are completely voluntary positions, no one is being ordered to fly them.
 

3green

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New fighter has nothing to do with the Ph2/3/FLIT training programs, which are different aircraft types and will be contracted out, likely to CAE or Babcock. The contractor decides on airframe to meet CF requirements. It's a totally separate project from next fighter. The new trainer contract will likely be setup much like the original NFTC contract - aircraft are bought by wholly gov't owned "company" funded with gov't bonds, in order to get around ITARS export requirements. The "company" ("Mil-Tair" in the case of current NFTC) then 'leases' them to the contractor who operates, maintains, repairs, fuels, hangars, upgrades etc. and in turn 'leases' them to the RCAF. The point is, because of the contract they're not considered CF owned assets. They have a military certificate of airworthiness, but are treated like a contractor owned asset. The current NFTC contract has been extended to 2027, with likely extension to 2028 or beyond.

It's unlikely they will just add on a few extra tails for a different Sqn for a different mission. To buy extra airframes would be a whole separate capital expenditure and given the nature of the mission, likely would have to be a CF owned and self-insured asset. A dozen wouldn't be nearly enough to run the shows, manage unserviceability, attrition, training etc. If it was a contractor supplied asset like the Hawk/Harvard currently are under NFTC, it would mean the contractor also provides all maintenance and servicing (like the contractor currently does on these airframes) - including on the road throughout the show season - which would have huge costs and have to be included in a separate contract. This is setting aside the fact that the Hawk/TX would be immensely more expensive to operate and the fierce argument that they are not well suited to fly the type of show 431 puts on. The public would scoff at the price tag, whatever it is.
 

3green

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Snowbirds are completely voluntary positions, no one is being ordered to fly them.

While I agree with you, it's a voluntary military in general. Regardless, it does not absolve the folks in charge of ensuring troops have the right equipment.
 
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