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Wearing an Ancestor's Medals Mega-thread

Scott

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Just an FYI for the future: don't report a post or action and then call it out yourself. By reporting it you're taking hands off the wheel and asking the staff to do something, so let that happen. And no, I'm not saying this because George is staff.

Scott
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Loachman

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Rhodesian said:
Yeaterday, I gave a proper link to The Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Which does indeed bring up his basic information. Thanks, and that may be useful to others as well. It duplicates the information on the Rangoon Memorial, which I already have.
 

x_para76

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Watched some of the d-day anniversary coverage today on the CBC and saw members of the Cogswell family wearing their Grandfather's medals at the ceremony and interviewed by the media. Should they be charged under the C.C for their transgression upon returning to Canada?
 

x_para76

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lestock said:
Dear x para
It is my considered opinion that you are a muck-raking knob end.

Lestock  cheers for that. PM inbound!

George I'm pretty sure the C.C of Canada applies to all Canadians whether at home or abroad but perhaps I've been mislead there.
 

PuckChaser

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X_para76 said:
George I'm pretty sure the C.C of Canada applies to all Canadians whether at home or abroad but perhaps I've been mislead there.

If you're a soldier deployed on operations, yep.

Otherwise you belong to the law of the land AFAIK.
 

McG

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X_para76 said:
George I'm pretty sure the C.C of Canada applies to all Canadians whether at home or abroad but perhaps I've been mislead there.
With few exceptions, the criminal code applies only in Canada.  Aside from extending the law via section 130 of the NDA, the only other area I know of the criminal code applying outside the country is for offences relating to some sex crimes.
 

x_para76

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MCG said:
With few exceptions, the criminal code applies only in Canada.  Aside from extending the law via section 130 of the NDA, the only other area I know of the criminal code applying outside the country is for offences relating to some sex crimes.
Then I stand corrected. Lucky for those two young men.
 

Transporter

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X_para76 said:
Then I stand corrected. Lucky for those two young men.
I'd be willing to bet that had these two young men been wearing their ancestor's medals at a similar ceremony in Canada, nothing would have come of it, other than maybe someone pointing it out to them after the fact. I think the law is mostly concerned with folks wearing honors and awards and misrepresenting them as their own, which these two clearly weren't doing.
 

ModlrMike

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I'll post this again because it's burried elsewhere deep in the thread.

The original impetus behind the legislation was driven by reports of benefits fraud at the end of WWI. I would opine that where no fraud is attempted, no offence exists. However it is also worth noting that this is a reverse onus law which would likely not withstand a court challenge today.
 

x_para76

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X_para76 said:
Not that I have any intention of wearing them but we just got word that the MOD is going to issue us all of my Grandfather's WW 2 medals. Since he had never received any of them the process took a little while to complete and by the time we receive them it'll have been just over a year from flash to bang.

For anyone on here looking to do the same as above I've just received the medals from the MOD. The process from flash to bang has taken approximately one year. This is probably the worst case scenario in terms of time lines because my grandfather didn't have a medals card, they had to do a full background check on his service history to determine his entitlements.

If anyone needs any assistance pursuing this please feel free to reach out via PM and I'd be happy to provide any info that may help you.
 

George Wallace

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X_para76 said:
For anyone on here looking to do the same as above I've just received the medals from the MOD. The process from flash to bang has taken approximately one year. This is probably the worst case scenario in terms of time lines because my grandfather didn't have a medals card, they had to do a full background check on his service history to determine his entitlements.

If anyone needs any assistance pursuing this please feel free to reach out via PM and I'd be happy to provide any info that may help you.

Thank you for the update.

Can you make a new topic in the Family Research forum with a brief synopsis of what you had to do?
 

expwor

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I have a related question about wearing of medals.  I earned the Corrections Exemplary Service Medal while with the Correctional Service Of Canada.  Now that I'm retired I'm getting the medal, ribbon along with the certificate under one frame and hang it on a wall
What I also got with the medal is a little pin of the medal, approx. 1/2"high if that (it's pretty small)
Am I the only one who can wear that pin of the medal?  I'm thinking of giving the pin to a certain someone special but don't want to do anything that will cause any problems
Does anyone here know if it's legal for someone to wear a pin of a medal or do the same restrictions apply as with medals themselves
Thanks

Tom
 

ModlrMike

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I would say that the intent is that the pin represents the medal, so it's probably specific to you. For example, when I was made SB St J, I was given an lapel pin as well as the decoration. It was explained to me that pin represented the medal and was for daily wear. There is also precedence with the Order of Canada and OrMM as well.

I don't think that your giving the pin away will cause "problems" as too few people will know the meaning. It just won't be correct in the strictest sense.
 

expwor

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OK Thanks...think I'll just keep it for myself, and get her another gift

Tom
 

marshall sl

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It's a lapel pin and it's  a mini version of the medal.  Are you not mounting it for wear? Too many CSC types just hide it away. Mine is mounted with the rest of mine
 

expwor

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The actual medal I am getting mounted in a frame with the certificate
It's at the frame shop as we speak
And no, never would think of giving it away, although one day after I pass away, it's there for the family for memories
The mini lapel pin (which I was thinking about giving as a gift), well I wore it with my uniform along with my 25 year pin.  I don't dress up, think the last time I did was about 10 years ago (seriously) and the casual clothes I do wear don't lend themselves to having pins on them

Tom
 

expwor

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Got my medal and certificate back from the framers yesterday afternoon
Here's what the finished product looks like.  Better than staying in the sock drawer LOL
And just to get an idea of the size of the pin of the medal another pic

Tom
 
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