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Wearing an Ancestor's Medals Mega-thread

Nicholas Cressman

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Voted 'yes' by mistake, my mouse was acting funny.

I do not believe that cadets should be allowed to wear medals on their uniform. a proper display of pride at your relative(s)'s aveivments would be to display the medals, as has been mentioned before, hanging on a wall, or in a display, etc.

My father had his father's medals, and his own put under glass in a nice frame, and they are now in his study. When I join and make acheivments, my awards will be added to them. It is a great tradition to start, and they are seen and remembered more, every time you walk into the room, rather than seeing them once or twice a year on a uniform, which didn't even belong to the person who earned the awards.
 

Inch

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IMO, the only medals you should be wearing are your own. After my grandfather died, I was given his medals, his dog tags, his 436 Sqn crest and a photo of him just prior to shipping off to Burma. Here's what I did with it all, my mom cried when I showed her.

I had the photo restored, medals court mounted and cleaned, and everything framed as you see here.

 
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aesop081

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Inch said:
IMO, the only medals you should be wearing are your own. After my grandfather died, I was given his medals, his dog tags, his 436 Sqn crest and a photo of him just prior to shipping off to Burma. Here's what I did with it all, my mom cried when I showed her.

I had the photo restored, medals court mounted and cleaned, and everything framed as you see here.

Now that is a realy good way to do it........... :salute:
 

Michael Dorosh

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aesop081 said:
Now that is a realy good way to do it........... :salute:

My dad never had any medals, he was only in for three years in the Militia, but I made him cry at Christmas once also - framed his photo, along with the RCA cap badge, a set of bombardier chevrons, and a brass plaque with his name, rank and unit on it.  I think the wine helped him along, but it was a nice reaction. ;)

At a gun show, I found a flash for his battery and added it in later.  I wonder how many of these little displays there are across the country.

Maybe we need a photo gallery at army.ca of these framed displays.  I know RSM McCumber's son, who posts here, has some really great framed presentations and many are already in the gallery.
 
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aesop081

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Michael Dorosh said:
My dad never had any medals, he was only in for three years in the Militia, but I made him cry at Christmas once also - framed his photo, along with the RCA cap badge, a set of bombardier chevrons, and a brass plaque with his name, rank and unit on it.   I think the wine helped him along, but it was a nice reaction. ;)

At a gun show, I found a flash for his battery and added it in later.   I wonder how many of these little displays there are across the country.

Maybe we need a photo gallery at army.ca of these framed displays.   I know RSM McCumber's son, who posts here, has some really great framed presentations and many are already in the gallery.

Sounds like a realy good idea Micheal.........
 

Scott

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Good on you, Inch! I am in the process of doing something similar for my Dad.

 

tabernac

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LF(CMO) said:
This is a very interesting topic and I've heard it debated many times.  My understanding is that it is illegal in Canada to wear someone else's war medals even if it's your Dad, Grandfather etc.  However, the president of the local Airborne Asso ,a very good friend of mine, reads the same thing and interperts it that it is legal if you wear them on the opposite side.

Will Byrd, who wrote the WW I classic, "Ghosts Have Warm Hands" said in his book that it is your duty to wear them (on the opposite side) on Nov 11 ONLY.

I wore my Dad's on my RCL Blazer after my Dad passed away on the next Nov 11.  I discontinued it after as to not cause any controversy.  One of my grandsons ( age 5) wore his great'grandfather's on last Nov 11.

Evidently it is legal in Australia and very much encouraged.  I had some friends over here from Aus and they were 'shocked' that Canadians didn't follow that as well and they blamed it some outdated rule forced on us by the POMIES!  Their rationale was, " what better way to commemorate what your ancestors did for their country".  

I agree with the Australian viewpoint.  They are more nationalistic than we are, as a rule ,and more inclined to do their own thing! :salute:
I completely agree with this, including only wearing the medals on the 11th of November (with the miniturized set for cadets). IMO I find it disheartening that so many here do not like the idea.

ToRN said:
I do not believe that cadets should be allowed to wear medals on their uniform. a proper display of pride at your relative(s)'s aveivments would be to display the medals, as has been mentioned before, hanging on a wall, or in a display, etc.
I don't completely agree with this because few, if any people would ever see they're acheivements.
 

gun plumber

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You did not earn them,therefore your not entitled to wear them.If you want to remember,have them remounted,matted on their regimental colors and maybe if you can find it,their original capbadge.Looks very smart and is a excellent way to preserve your families history.
 

tabernac

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gun plumber said:
You did not earn them,therefore your not entitled to wear them.If you want to remember,have them remounted,matted on their regimental colors and maybe if you can find it,their original capbadge.Looks very smart and is a excellent way to preserve your families history.

My problem with mounting them is the NO ONE(out side of the family) sees the medals. Having a family member killed while serving, then not remembering they're sacrifices, is the last thing they wanted. Then you might say "That is why we have Remembrance Day." Well in my opinion, wearing the medals of you Grand-father/father/uncle/great-uncle is the of the utmost respect for them, and they're sacrifice. When you wear they're medals you are essentially saying "I remember you, and to me you are the most important person not only on this day, but through out every year you have not been with us."
 

Nicholas Cressman

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I could post the one that I have, (pretty basic)

but My digicam is an hour away at my sister's right now :-\

(Sorry for the bit of a change in topic)
Nic
 

my72jeep

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gunner56 said:
I just want to know where to get my dad's WWII medals plated,and remounted.Not that I want to,or would wear them,I just want to frame them and put them on the wall next to his service photo(RCAF).
I just had a friends grandfathers redone as a Xmas present went to the civ Tailor on CFB Borden and she sent them to the girl who does them for base supply.but if you look at the top of the page there is an add for some one who does it. Iron horse Medals)
 

1feral1

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I forgot to mention in my last post. On ANZAC Day I wear (with my Poly dress uniform) my two gongs, and the right, medals of my Great Uncle 267104 PTE RF Allen late 28th Bn - DOW at Passchendaele 07 Nov 1917), on the right.

Its common to see here (not only Aussies, but all former BCW soldiers and families), serving soldiers (from PTE to GEN) wearing their relative's medals on the right on ANZAC Day. Its as common is the ordinary bloke, woman or young child in ANZAC marches wearing them too.

Quite touching and shows a great deal of national pride and thanks for our freedom, and for our serving ADF members.

I really wish I could describe the feeling on ANZAC Day, and for those of you who have seen George Street Sydney on 25 Apr, I guess you'll understand. One of the most amazing things I saw was two kids, both about 5 or 6 yrs old. The boy in period WW1 Light Horse ANZAC dress, and the girl in period Aussie WW1 nursing dress, holding hands as they 'marched' in down George Street with their Vet grandparents and family.   I really wish I could explain it, but you have to live it I guess.

ANZAC Day 2004 saw over 25,000 soldiers, Vets and family members representing those who can't be there, or have since passed on, in the Sydney march. Some wearing medals on the left, some on the right, some on both, some not at all.

Crowds estimated at 500,000+ lined George Street, and the the Vets march by, flags wave, and there is a general applause from the crowds. Impressive to say the least. Association after Association, Regiment after Regiment, Band after Band.

The parade lasts from 0800 to after lunch and does not stop (even for the occasion Vet who has a heart attack - they just march around as he is worked on)!

The ANZAC spirit is alive and well in Australia, and will survive future generations, through active participation, and education, as 'what is ANZAC' is even taught in elementry schools.

Cheers,

Wes

Wow, power-edited for heaps of spelling errors
 

LF(CMO)

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"Quite touching and shows a great deal of national pride and thanks for our freedom."

It's great that this issue has been raised as it serves to illustrate very clearly the difference between an Australian and a Canadian!  As far as the so called CC is concerned, the local President of the Airborne Asso was assured by the RCMP that this is not an issue with them.  (Particuliarly since one of their Rtd NCO's wears his grandfather's (on his Red Serge) on Nov 11).

I intend to wear my Dad's (pt Sgt. Inf WW II) again on Remembrance Day at some point when I feel the calling.  It's really only an issue between me and him.
 

Alex

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After reading this topic, I can see both sides of the debate. I can definitely see Wesley's point of view.  Displaying family members medals once a year is an excellent way to honour them, as well as let others view what they have done.

On the other hand, I don't think I could wear the medals of my grandfathers or great grandfathers, simply because I wouldn't feel comfortable wearing them without earning them, especially in the case of one of my great grandfathers who was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal at Passchendaele during the Great War.  What he did to earn that medal was so remarkable that I think I would feel more comfortable honouring him by donating it to a museum, if they wanted it, rather than wearing it (if i choose to join the military).

-Alex
 

1feral1

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A few more words....

Its a personal decision for everyone to wear them or not. However we can leave it a personal thing. The message is clear. "I am wearing thse medals on this special day, on the RIGHT side of my chest to remember/honour my relative". No other purpose! The wearing them on the RH side signals this message.

However get caught wearing them on the left (say a 50+ yr old Aussie man wearing Viet Nam service medals) and not have earned them again is another story. Sadly there is posers here who do this on occasion. Call them fakers, posers or whatever. I call them pathetic.

Besides with the CC, criminal intent has too be proven, and I don't think anyone out ther would be found guilty, as there is no criminal intent of remembering a relative on a special day. I don't even think one would be charged, and if he was, they should go right to the media!

Get caught posing, thats another story. We all can agree to that. Impersonation is one thing, but honouring and remembering is another. Completely different like chalk and cheese.

I respect everone's opinion on this, again because its a personal thing. We each have rights, and can express them as required, but its when one's beliefs dictates things ( because they don't agree), and smothers my freedom, thats what begins to get under my skin.

Authorise the wear on teh right on 11 Nov, at the discretion of the family. If one does not want to wear them, thats fine.

Cold beers,

Wes
 

rmc_wannabe

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Inch said:
IMO, the only medals you should be wearing are your own. After my grandfather died, I was given his medals, his dog tags, his 436 Sqn crest and a photo of him just prior to shipping off to Burma. Here's what I did with it all, my mom cried when I showed her.

I had the photo restored, medals court mounted and cleaned, and everything framed as you see here.

Thats beautiful. I wish to do the same thing for my great grandfather's WWI medals. However i have run into a snag. The medals were destroyed in a house fire before i could get them. I know this is a long shot, but does anyone know the properchannels to go through to get replacements?All i have to go with is his rank, SN and unit . Any help would be appreciated
 

Michael OLeary

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The Directorate of History and Heritage (DHH) mentions the replacement of lost or stolen medals here:
http://www.forces.gc.ca/hr/dhh/engraph/faqs_e.asp?category=honawa&FaqID=19#answer
But it appears to only address replacements for living recipients (serving and retired)

This page from Veterans Affairs provides and information contact for First World War medals that may be worth trying:
http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/clients/sub.cfm?source=collections/cmdp/medals/infomedals

Medals (WW1, WW2, Korea): Army, Navy, RCAF:

Veterans Affairs Canada
Honours & Awards Section
Room 1411, 66 Slater Street
Ottawa, Ontario
K1A 0P4
Telephone:
Local:995-5003
Toll Free:1-877-995-5003
Fax: 1-613-947-3421

One option you have is to investigate acquiring modern restrikes of his medals for framing purposes.
_____________________________________________________________

And, to follow-up the orginal thread, here is DHH's FAQ response:

http://www.forces.gc.ca/hr/dhh/engraph/faqs_e.asp?category=honawa&FaqID=25#answer

Question - May I wear a relative's medals?

Answer - Article 419 of the Criminal Code of Canada prohibits the wearing of orders, decorations and medals by anyone other than the individual who was awarded the honour.
 

George Wallace

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Further on Replacement medals:  If you require the info on what medals he had (if you don't already know) you can go to the Public Archives of Canada with the information you have and request a list of medals awarded to him.  You may be able to replace them, at some expense, by visiting various Militaria Shows around the country or Coin and Medal Dealers (some are listed in the Yellow Pages).

One of the advertisers on this site is Clive Law of Service Publications and he hosts a Militaria Show twice a year in Ottawa.  There are also large shows in Toronto and other major metropolitan areas.

Gw
 

rmc_wannabe

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George Wallace said:
Further on Replacement medals:   If you require the info on what medals he had (if you don't already know) you can go to the Public Archives of Canada with the information you have and request a list of medals awarded to him.   You may be able to replace them, at some expense, by visiting various Militaria Shows around the country or Coin and Medal Dealers (some are listed in the Yellow Pages).

One of the advertisers on this site is Clive Law of Service Publications and he hosts a Militaria Show twice a year in Ottawa.   There are also large shows in Toronto and other major metropolitan areas.

Gw
Cool i'll keep that in mind
 
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