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Shin Splints, Blisters, and PT [Merged]

Col.Steiner

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I would agree with Hatchetman about what to wear on your feet. Use the kit supplied to you, it is given to your for a reason. The reason I know this is that I learned it by watching a fellow recruit during QL3 who decided to experiment with his own sock layering technique, using three pairs of white socks and some high-tec crap from a outdoor clothing store. After about 6 km out of that damn 14 km ruck march, he couldn't walk anymore do to the pain in his feet. He wasn't a pus either. When we got back to our tents, he had his feet up on the cot and a medic was taking his boots and socks off. When the medic removed his last par of socks, the ones in contact with his feet, the skin came off with it. The skin peeled right off the bottom of his feet in a perfect shape of a foot, toes and all! Kind of looked like one of those bathtub grip tapes shaped as a foot. He was forced to redo his training in the winter. My feet were fine with what I was issued.
 

Marshall

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Dirt Digger said:
So from what you've said, after about ten minutes you start having severe pain in your lower legs.  I'm assuming that it causes you to shorten your stride.  When you stop running, does the pain go away after a few minutes?  Have you ever had your leg go "rigid" and been unable to flex your foot up and down, or had numbness & tingling in your feet?

From your comments and symptoms so far, it sounds like (chronic) anterior compartment syndrome.  Pretty common to blame the problem on "shin splints".  This site has a fairly good explanation:  http://www.spinalhealth.net/inj-comp.html

I highly agree with ModlrMike...go and get a sports medicine referal.

It seems to happen about 5 minutes into a mid-speed run. Then it escalates quickly from there. The pain does usually go away with about 4 minutes of not walking much. I never get to the point (unless i just havnt pushed it enough) to not be able to move my joints. :/ Im only 17 tho, so my doctor dismissed it. But he could be wrong. I dont get any feel of numbness or tingling tho (except on the immidiate spot). Ive had this for a long time, even when i stopped exercising for like half a year. And it never went away, same pain occured when i began again.
 

blacktriangle

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Good luck bud. It might be the hardest thing you have done in your life, but when its over...you'll probably look back and see it was the start of the best time of your life.

Hang in there, and keep us updated.  :salute:
 
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Hi, Thank you very much, will it be harder then all the infantry stuff? I am excited but nervous lol, I should be going to school on Monday not flying to the army. I am sure I will be the youngest on course. My age makes me feel very unprepared, going to have to bite the bullet.
 

blacktriangle

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spartan_phillip said:
Hi, Thank you very much, will it be harder then all the infantry stuff? I am excited but nervous lol, I should be going to school on Monday not flying to the army. I am sure I will be the youngest on course. My age makes me feel very unprepared, going to have to bite the bullet.

No, I'm not Infantry, but since you're going reg force...don't expect a cakewalk. About age, I did BMQ (albeit reserve) at 16 and it was not terribly hard physically...the hardest part  was working as a group and meeting our timings.  ;D I did accelerated courses so I could leave high school early, and I'm done in a week, looking to go reg force...I know how you feel. Its not age, it is maturity- the two don't always come hand in hand. Good luck.

Cheers.

 
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Hi, well what do you know. Same boat, I was going to go reserve but looked at my transcript and said I can get done a year early. So I just waited. I agree, age does inforce maturity. Thanks, I bet I will need it.
 
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I found an abundance of useful information in this thread. I am currently in training (As there is not much I can do outside of school and working full time..) and am hoping to be accepted into some type of CF infantry regiment. I still need to fill out an application and find out more information for basic training, but I have to leave that until tomorrow morning. I am currently in terrible shape for a 17 year old.. I am basically a 6'4" bone rack. I have been going to the weight room lately though, but lacking any cardiovascular. I thank paracowboy for his information, as I will undoubtedly be using this week. Also, I enjoyed the small bit about not suggesting to be a plane.. but back onto topic. I need to pick up some vitamin C anyways due to the fact that I am experiencing mild symptoms of scurvy (Note to anyone else in my position, don't live off microwaveable food and sandwiches!). Are calcium supplements suggested? I do not react well with milk products, and in turn, lack a calcium intake. As far as testosterone, paracowboy suggested zinc and magnesium. Would I need to purchase both? Or just one? (Yes, I seem to be deficient in this area as well, unless I have just done a more demanding workout session.)
 

OkotoksRookie

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Yeah man, I agree. This post is chalk full of good solid info.
Calcium supliments are king for people who are lactose intolerant and their faily inexpensive.
As for Zinc and Magnesium I would buy them seperately so you can monitor your dosages better. Jamieson's brand is pretty inexpensive and has good dosages. Also... never underestimate the value of Vit. C. If your working out hard some Vitamin C can really help keep your immune system and energy up.
 
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Yeah, I notice a lot of the guys at the gym bring oranges and such, especially when they are starting to get sick. My question is mostly: Do you require both magnesium and zinc to raise testosterone levels? Or are they both just different substances that cause the same effect?

Edit: I found this on a separate web page for anyone that may have been curious like myself. They both seem to cause separate effects, so I don't seem the problem with taking both.

"Zinc

If you are deficient in this mineral you are seriously sabotaging your efforts!  A deficiency will noticeably decrease muscle strength and endurance!  Zinc literally promotes healing, tissue repair, and muscle growth. And as I was discussing earlier it helps to optimize and increase Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1, Growth Hormone, and the all mighty Testosterone!  In addition, many of the enzymes that prevent the buildup of lactic acid (the "fatigue acids") require zinc. Doesn't sound like something you want to mess with does it?  Exactly! 

The second trace mineral is:
Magnesium

A deficiency in this mineral will decrease oxygen delivery to your muscle tissue.  Magnesium promotes
muscle strength and endurance.  What is really exciting is that it also is proven to promote relaxation.
Magnesium also activates enzymes necessary for the metabolism of carbohydrates and amino acids.
This is also something you do not want to find yourself deficient in.

An easy solution would be to simply supplement with these two minerals.  However there are some rules to the procedure. 

a.  take it 30 minutes before bed on an empty stomach ( you should digest at least 1-2 hours before taking this supplement )

The reason why I say to take it 30 minutes before bedtime is because zinc's effect on healing, tissue repair, and muscle growth is maximized during sleep. The largest daily burst of natural growth hormone occurs during stage 3 and 4 sleep (about an hour and a half after going to sleep).  Insulin, testosterone, zinc, and magnesium increase the effect of growth hormone. So, this is the time you want zinc and magnesium at a peak level in the bloodstream.

b.  The dosage should consist of:  Magnesium: 450mg, Zinc: 30mg

c.  Do not take anything that has calcium in it with zma!  Calcium competes ferociously with the absorption of it!"
Information taken from: http://www.abcbodybuilding.com/magazine/zman.htm
 

PMedMoe

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I'm not trying to be ignorant here, just curious.  If people are into body building, why are they not also into eating properly?  People who eat a variety of foods from the food groups usually do not require supplements.  Obviously, if you're lactose intolerant, you may need to take a calcium supplement, although the lactose in cheese and yogurt sometimes does not cause the same problems as the lactose in milk.  The same for vitamin C; why not just have a glass of orange juice every day?  ???
 

OkotoksRookie

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Awesome question PMedMoe,
Very often eating lean or entering a 'cutting-phase' you'll be on a very restrictive diet (a lot of the competitive body builders I meet only eat chicken, egg whites, oatmeal and steamed veggies for days upon days durring these phases) so you miss out on some of the vitamins and minerals your body needs. They'll take multi's or cull their pill popping to supplement what their diet is lacking to make sure that their still preforming in the gym.
As for the lactose and calcium supps. your right. Food is always better then pill. Try other sources, but if it hurts you, don't do it.
Vitamin C in forms of real fruit and concentrated fruit juices (no sugar added) are always king. Again, food is better then pill. That being said, sometimes the sugar content in fruit's and fruit juices (even though it's natural) can hurt diabetics if their blood sugar is allready really high. That would be the only reason I could think of for taking pill over the real thing but there may be more (i.e. time, unable to carry fruit while traveling ect...)
 
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Well, in my case, I don't have the time, nor the budget to purchase much as far as required nutrition. I buy buns and meat every weekend for dinner at work.. but I also have to go to school. Between school and working full time, I don't get a lot of time to myself. I usually leave for school at 8AM, work out a lunch time (11AM-12PM), get home at 2PM to have a quick break and food, leave at 3PM for work, and get home between 10PM and 11PM. Out here in the boonies of Vancouver Island, everything is already closed by then. Vegetables and fruits never last a whole week in my living arrangements, so I pretty much buy it as I need it. Although, thanks to Paracowboy, I did take his advice as far as supplements. On my way to the recruiting office this morning, I spent my Christmas bonus on a multivitamin (containing Vitamin C), protein mix, as well as a supplement containing: Magnesium, Zinc, Calcium, etc. I purchased all of this for about $80 from a Canadian based company called: Popeye's Supplements. They do offer a military discount as well, and is apparently quite cheaper than you'd find on base if any of you are interested.

As far as cheese and yogurt, yogurt seems to cause the same results as milk, unlike cheese. Although, if I relied on cheese for calcium, I would be as constipated as.. well.. you get the picture.

Edit: Spelling correction.
 

ForsterFB

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Marshall.  Big Shin Splint problem, need help. August 23, 2007, 22:34:15 » Quote 

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"He told me to just rest and do a thing where you crunch up a towel with your toes, and that it helps flex all the muscles in your lower leg.

I wasnt very dedicated to the towel thing tho, so here iam with them still. I want to get rid of them now [. . . ] and then eventually join the CF. I decided not to take Gym12 for i wouldnt be put into situations of large stress on my shin splints.

Also, is there any drugs to hell combat possible inflamation in the shins?"




Hello Marshall, I am a 3rd year B.A. Physical Education major at Vancouver Island University, my interest leans towards physiotherapy. 

I think you're situation is very interesting and would like to wade in. 

At 17 you are still developing muscle strength and balance, I used to have exactly the same running pattern where you are on your toes most of the time.  What sports do you play basketball and volleyball, maybe soccer as well, and track?  Your doctor was probably right on the money about a muscle imbalance causing part of the problem.  Try strengthening your calves to counteract the strength of the muscles attached to the tibia and fibula, this will more evenly distribute the forces required to run and to stop. 

Part of what causes "shin splints" is the tearing of the fascia around muscles.  Fascia is essentially a fibrous tissue that acts like a glove around your muscles and nerves holding them down in bunches.  Essentially the fascia allows our bodies muscles and nerves to pass smoothly like nylon fibers in a cotton sheath past each other.

Dedication, to physiotherapy is what will get you through the problem.  See a good sports physiotherapist in your area, and dedicate yourself to the exercises they assign you.  If you want to dedicate a year of your time to fix the problem, you have to dedicate yourself to the work involved to make it happen.  Especially due to the fact that dedication to an army life is a lot more demanding physically than a little bit of Gr. 12 Gym.

Marsall "any drugs to [help] combat possible inflamation" will only mask the symptoms and allow you to keep going until serious damage does happen.  Alot of the time people carry an ethnocentric view that doctors and drugs are what is required to stay healthy.  Preventive medicine, like preventive maintenance (such as changing your cars oil, or cleaning a rifle) is alot cheaper and affordable than fixing the symptoms that develop through a lack of maintenance, like a broken car, or a broken rifle or a broken body.

I hope that I have added something useful here for you and that you see a Sports Physiotherapist that can help you.  An initial visit will be very minimal in cost, and you will have access to a qualified professional who has probably already done academic work around or with your problem.  At the least you will be given a few exercises and good advice.  Good luck.    :army:
 

Sigger

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These symptoms sounds alot like the same thing a friend of mine has. He suffered through it from basic through his 3's. Eventually he got a surgery and is now 100%
 

The_Falcon

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Marshall said:
It seems to happen about 5 minutes into a mid-speed run. Then it escalates quickly from there. The pain does usually go away with about 4 minutes of not walking much. I never get to the point (unless i just havnt pushed it enough) to not be able to move my joints. :/ Im only 17 tho, so my doctor dismissed it. But he could be wrong. I dont get any feel of numbness or tingling tho (except on the immidiate spot). Ive had this for a long time, even when i stopped exercising for like half a year. And it never went away, same pain occured when i began again.

I am going to to tell you from my own personal experience (ie I personal experienced the exact same symptoms), what you describe is more than likely Exertional Compartment Syndrome, and not shin splints (as sigger and dirt digger) already mentioned.  Go see a Doctor pronto!!  If he is unsure if you have it or not, (not all GP's know what exertional compartment syndrome is) get a referral to a orthopedist or sports medicine doctor.  If you are in the GTA these guys http://www.semisportmed.com/hm/ specialize in all things sports related and can positively diagnose whether you have shin splints or Compartment Syndrome (LFCA TC Meaford sends troops they believe who are suffering these problems there to get tested).  If you want to pursue a military career, you NEED to get this sorted out ASAP, ESPECIALLY if its compartment syndrome, as it will progressively get worse, and in the end may require corrective surgery (which is what happened to me.).
 

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  Re: Shin Splints, Blisters, and PT
« Reply #85 on: November 16, 2007, 05:15:58 » Quote 
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Quote from: paracowboy on August 09, 2005, 11:23:29
Attitude Again:
  Bein' an Infantryman is persistence. Never quitting. Ignoring pain, hunger, exhaustion, fear, and doubt. No warm and fuzzies, no hero's accolades, no cookies, just pain and sweat and suffering.  You just have to fight the pain. Fight through to the other side of it. Become one with it. Endure. Outlast. Overcome. Ruck up, lean forward, and hump! Time to heal later.


Dedication.  It's not easy.  You've got a year to heal Marshall, better see that physio about Compartment Syndrome, and get started. 
 

Marshall

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RedBurton said:
  Re: Shin Splints, Blisters, and PT
« Reply #85 on: November 16, 2007, 05:15:58 » Quote 
__________________________________________________________________________
Quote from: paracowboy on August 09, 2005, 11:23:29
Attitude Again:
   Bein' an Infantryman is persistence. Never quitting. Ignoring pain, hunger, exhaustion, fear, and doubt. No warm and fuzzies, no hero's accolades, no cookies, just pain and sweat and suffering.  You just have to fight the pain. Fight through to the other side of it. Become one with it. Endure. Outlast. Overcome. Ruck up, lean forward, and hump! Time to heal later.


Dedication.  It's not easy.  You've got a year to heal Marshall, better see that physio about Compartment Syndrome, and get started. 



Ive actually gotten much better on my own now. Ive lost around 20+ pounds and the pain is only on one leg now and its 1/10th of the intensity it use to be (and it goes away at times during a run). I believe a rapid onset of inactivity might of triggered it. And i believe if i keep at it and loose another 10 or so pounds ill be beating it to dust. :)
 
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