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Shin Splints, Blisters, and PT [Merged]

Wright

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The biggest thing i noticed was peoples feet with blisters and irritations after a day of drill, ruck marches and basic marching around,

i found a magic little  gel called hydropel, even after the 13km i had no blisters with this stuff, for the most part even average foot pain and cramping was gone with this, i told my DS about it and he had heard about people doing the ninemegan( spelling????) using the same stuff,
worked wonders for my feet
might for yours
 
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Bandit1

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Quick question about socks...

Can you bring your own wools (in my case, Smartwools) for your training boots?  Or should you stick with what is provided to you?

Bandit
 

The_Falcon

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Bandit1 said:
Quick question about socks...

Can you bring your own wools (in my case, Smartwools) for your training boots?  Or should you stick with what is provided to you?

Bandit

If your on course stick with what the queen gave you, unless your course staff say otherwise.
 
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Bandit1

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Hatchet Man said:
If your on course stick with what the queen gave you, unless your course staff say otherwise.

Thank you Sir, appreciate the advice!
 

Marshall

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Hi,

I read the article by para on shin splints (very good)


Im wondering if you guys think i should go see a doctor for help, or if you know the best thing to do?

Ive had S.S for as far back as i can remember, and i dont remember it ever going away. Only last year my gym teacher told me i probably had a problem called shin splints, i always thought it was just muscle burn when i was younger. Until the pain started to get so bad that after 10 minutes of running my shins would be burning a hole in the ground.

I use to run on just my toes usually, which would make me very bouncy. My teacher said it was probably making my calf (or shin) muscles wayy too strong compared to the other muscles around my tibia and making them flame up or something.

He told me to just rest and do a thing where you crunch up a towel with your toes, and that it helps flex all the muscles in your lower leg.

I wasnt very dedicated to the towel thing tho, so here iam with them still. I want to get rid of them now tho for i can begin to exercise much more during my G12 year coming up, and then eventually join the CF. I decided not to take Gym12 for i wouldnt be put into situations of large stress on my shin splints.

Also, is there any drugs to hell combat possible inflamation in the shins?

Any help would be appreciated greatly.

-Alex  :blotto:
 

Wright

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if ya dont mind doing yer laundry every night on course(or your section does it every night), go for it, they never asked to see the socks we we wearing, people even wore sports socks cause it was the middle os summer and the amount your feet sweat was crazy.
 
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** Salute **

It's very accurate statements expressed here. Thank God for the good advice and sensible advice shared here. You were a soldier for a long time, me thinks . . . .


paracowboy said:
Attitude Again:
Some of you youngsters out there need to realize that this ain't no movie. I don't mean to preach again, I just see a lot of young guys going into this with visions of grandeur and thinking it's gonna be like some damn TV show. Sorry, kids. They're not gonna start handing out the black nomex and MP5's when you get here. They're gonna hand you some wore out 70's era kit with a heavy ruck and a worn-out rifle. When that kidney pad on that ruck digs a hole in your back and your feet have been wet so long that they are cracking and bleeding, think back about the big adventure. Think I'm being dramatic? If you stay the course, it WILL happen. Reality is a cold slap in the face. If you want some good photos, take some shots of your feet after a few days of trenchfoot on the move. That'll be something to show the grandkids. This ain't TV, guys. It's not high adventure. Most of the time it just sucks.
The point of this post is so you can get your head right for what is to come. It's not about nomex, velcro and MP5's, guys. It's about jumpin', humpin', freezing', walkin' and hurtin'. The new guys on here always say, "I know that" but I really don't think you do. But you will. I promise you that. The thing is, you can't quit. That's it. It's that simple. Never quit. A man who quits must be shunned. He sets a precedent of weakness that may drag others down with him. Other cherries may quit too. The quitter never thinks about others and the extra weight they will have to carry in his absence. He doesn't think about the extra shifts that his section will have to cover off. He only thinks of himself.
Bein' an Infantryman is persistence. Never quitting. Ignoring pain, hunger, exhaustion, fear, and doubt. No warm and fuzzies, no hero's accolades, no cookies, just pain and sweat and suffering.  You just have to fight the pain. Fight through to the other side of it. Become one with it. Endure. Outlast. Overcome. Ruck up, lean forward, and hump! Time to heal later.
Everyone thinks about pullin' the trigger, and bein' the he-ro. "Lookee here, everybody! I'm bustin' caps!" Well, sorry tough guy, but pulling a trigger is easy. Humping a ruck is when you find out who will be on the ambush to pull that trigger. That's the Infantry. Slogging along under a heavy load with your buddies. Being part of a team. Let's look at that again: Being part of a team. The men you are with at the end of a long hump are good men. The men to your front and rear in a chalk preparing to jump from the sky are good men. The men to your left and right in a trench system in -1, 000, 000 degree weather at EndEx are good men. Tested men. Training is good for more than just teaching you the skills you need. It also weeds out quitters, before they can get you killed.
The other side of the coin are those granola-munchin', tree-huggin' types who think that they're enlisting to hand out soap and blankies to the Third World. Sorry, again. That's not what Canada does. Despite the propaganda you've had shoved down your throat the past decade, that is not 'Peace-keeping', and it most certainly is not what we do overseas. We don't pose for cameras cuddling babies, and we're not constantly surrounded by smiling happy people. When you go on a tour, you will be in a different country where the majority of the populace are indifferent to your presence, a small percentage welcome you because of your money, and a small percentage will actively try to kill you. Thing is, that small percentage will be on BOTH sides of the conflict. You are in the middle of both warring factions. Just to make it more interesting, you are an Occupation Army, so a number of the indifferent population will support those who are trying to kill you. Then, you have the bandits, thugs, slavers, drug runners, local law enforcement, politicians, and other criminals whose businesses you are hampering. Add to that the branches of several different terrorist cells, and you can begin to understand that (oh my!) Canadian soldiers regularly face death from violent forces. And Canadian soldiers regularly deal death. So, if you're not willing to kill for Peace; if you don't honestly believe that Truth, Justice, and the NHL are worth committing cold-blooded murder for, maybe you shouldn't join our little club.
I didn't type all that crap out to demean any of you. I have better things to do with my time. I'm trying to help you. If you don't wanna listen, don't let the door hit you in the *** on your way out. You can accept that and learn something or you can move along. I don't care either way.

Oh, yeah: The grey man. The grey man is a very important concept or attribute. You must blend in, not stand out in the crowd. DO NOT DRAW ATTENTION TO YOURSELF. That means keeping your mouth shut and doing what your told. Look like the rest. Doing what your told to the best of your ability. Being PART OF THE TEAM. That is the grey man. That is why so many of you wannabe's, civvies, and cherries get slapped down on these sites. That is why you get chewed out in person. If you want to be a hero, don't enlist. If you want to be part of something greater than yourself, to become PART OF THE TEAM, sign the line. If you need recognition, or attention, the Infantry ain't for you. If you have an ego that needs gratification, and you can't place the interests of others before your own, this ain't the place for you.
If it were easy, anyone could do it. It ain't, and they can't.
 

combat_clarke

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I am the King of getting shin splits. I can get them walking bare foot across the floor. An old soccer buddy of mine told me to walk on my heals for a few minutes a day. So when I am home I stand up its like doing a reverse calf raise but your just putting all your weight on the heal of your foot and walk around for a few minutes. Never had shin splits again. Hope this helps.
 
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combat_clarke said:
I am the King of getting shin splits. I can get them walking bare foot across the floor. An old soccer buddy of mine told me to walk on my heals for a few minutes a day. So when I am home I stand up its like doing a reverse calf raise but your just putting all your weight on the heal of your foot and walk around for a few minutes. Never had shin splits again. Hope this helps.

Thank-you, Mr. Clarke. I will give it a try.  ;)
 

newrecruit

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  Try to walk on your heels with your toes lifted. And try to change your shoes. These are the 2 best advices and treatments I have ever recieved. Oh yes don't waste your time and money on a doctor unless it's extremely severe. There's a lot of streches for S.S on the internet
 

ModlrMike

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Agreed. Paracowboy did an exceptional job in explaining shin splints LINK.

newrecruit said:
Oh yes don't waste your time and money on a doctor unless it's extremely severe.

I disagree with newrecruit. I think your description of "burning a hole into the ground" qualifies as severe. I would recommend you see your doctor and explain the situation to him in exactly the terms you used here. Request a consult to either physio or sports medicine so that you can have a proper foot, leg, and gait assessment done. Even if you walk away with nothing more than new stretches and exercises, you will have gained something. Now is the time to get this problem resolved, not after you wind up on BMQ.
 
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Get to the doctor now.Ask for a circulation test.I too suffered with shin splints my whole life.I forced my way through the pain for my whole career.When I went to  the doctors the said it was everything from bad shoes to bad knees,A few years after I left the army I had severe chest pain and when I went to the hospital I was sent to a specialist who found the circulation problem in my lower legs.Because of the misdiagnosis and the lack of proper treatment,the only treatment that I have left is Amputation.GET TO A GOOD DOCTOR NOW.
 
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Hi, wow I wish I found this stuff a long time ago. I have less then a week, 6 days before I leave for Quebec. I have started running, but not enough I know. I think the worst part though for me will be chin ups and such. I am a fairly big guy. I am 17, I believe 88kg and about 6'3, I got short arms for my size though and I can hang with my arms at a 45 degree angle for a minute maybe longer but I think chin ups will be the death of me. I have no way to access a bar so if I can get a way quickly to work the affected areas that would be great... To make it worst I have no weights or anything, so is there anything I can do simply with myself or a household item?
The info is great, I just do not have enough time to apply it
Thanks very much
 

JBoyd

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there are alternate chin-up bars everywhere you just have to know what to look for, trees, a deck, a door frame if it is sturdy enough. you can buy a chinup bar for about $20-$30 at sportchek, but if you dont want to purchase one, well most playgrounds will have something easily useable as a chinup/pullup bar.
 
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Hi, Thank you, I wish I though of that. Park one block away, I will do it before my run.
Thanks again
 

Marshall

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thanks for the replies.

I went to my doctor and he doesnt know much about S.S. He said its probably just from years of walking the wrong way or something.

Ima get some better shoes (runners), and ill get a good sole or something to see if this will help. And ill try the walking on heel thing. I dont think its my circulation tho Rick.
 

Dirt Digger

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So from what you've said, after about ten minutes you start having severe pain in your lower legs.  I'm assuming that it causes you to shorten your stride.  When you stop running, does the pain go away after a few minutes?  Have you ever had your leg go "rigid" and been unable to flex your foot up and down, or had numbness & tingling in your feet?

From your comments and symptoms so far, it sounds like (chronic) anterior compartment syndrome.  Pretty common to blame the problem on "shin splints".  This site has a fairly good explanation:  http://www.spinalhealth.net/inj-comp.html

I highly agree with ModlrMike...go and get a sports medicine referal.
 

Command-Sense-Act 105

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Here is a link to a post I made earlier about running, injury and shoe selection

My best advice - don't buy any serious running footwear at a place like SportChek, Footlocker or others that sell a wide variety of athletic gear, clothing and athletic fashion items.  The staff in these places generally does not have the expertise that you will need to help get over your injury.

Best of luck getting fit and healthy.
 
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