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Trip Planning

tomahawk6

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I am planning on a road trip to Alaska which will require traveling through Canada. I will travel with 2 dogs and a pistol. I know the animals will need their shots to be up to date. As far as the pistol can I bring it into Canada and if so will I need a special locked container ? I have only brought shot guns in the past with no issues. I know I would have to declare any items with the border agent correct ? Thx
 

AbdullahD

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Do not have any help for this topic, aside from this link..
https://www.thoughtco.com/laws-for-taking-guns-into-canada-3321846

Others more knowledge could help better.. but what route are you planning on taking? I am most likely on the way and give you any tips, hints or tourist attractions you need. I have also gone north a bit as well. If you do stop in the area, drop a line, coffee will be on me if I am not working.

Abdullah
 

expwor

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And another bit of information from the CBSA website

https://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/import/iefw-iefa-eng.html

Good Luck

Tom
 

AmmoTech90

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Your pistol will be either a Restricted or Prohibited Firearm.  Any pistol magazine with over a 10 round capacity will be a Prohibited Device.

From the Canadian Border Services Agency website: https://cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/publications/dm-md/d19/d19-13-2-eng.html

For Restricted Firearms:
Licensed non-residents

99. Non-residents may import restricted firearms into Canada or may move them in transit through Canada if they have:

    (a) a valid purpose for importing the firearms;
    (b) a valid Possession and Acquisition Licence (PAL) or Possession Only Licence (POL) authorizing possession of that class of firearm;
    (c) a valid registration certificate for the firearm; and
    (d) a valid Authorization to Transport (ATT).

100. If the non-resident does not have all of the documentation listed above for the restricted firearm(s) they wish to import, they must:

    (a) have a valid purpose for importing the firearms;
    (b) have a valid Authorization to Transport (ATT);
    (c) complete a Non-resident Firearm Declaration (RCMP 5589) and, if applicable, a Non-resident Firearm Declaration Continuation Sheet (RCMP 5590);
    (d) pay the confirmation fee; and
    (e) have the form confirmed by the border services officer for either: the length of the ATT; or, 60 days, whichever is shorter.
    (f) Once confirmed, in this case, the NRFD acts as a temporary registration for the firearm(s) listed.
    Note: The confirmation fee is valid for 60 days from the date of payment and covers all firearms on the declaration. On any subsequent importation within the 60 day period of the same restricted firearm(s), the border services officer will match the firearm(s) to the original NRFD and check the validity of the ATT, but no additional fee is payable. If the non-resident does not have the ATT, CBSA may hold the firearm for 40 days while the non-resident satisfies the outstanding documentation requirements. Non-residents must make bona fide efforts to obtain the missing documentation as quickly as possible. Storage and transportation charges may apply.


For Prohibited:
Personal importations by non-residents

105. Non-residents may not import prohibited firearms. This includes movements in transit through Canada.


For Prohibited Device:

Personal importations by residents, non-residents, settlers, temporary and former residents

140. Residents, non-residents, settlers, temporary and former residents may not import prohibited weapons or devices.


So you cannot bring in a prohibited pistol and you cannot bring in a magazine with more than a 10 round magazine.
Best bet is to send it to a FFL in Alaska and pick it up there.

Bit more:
Definition of a Prohibited Firearm:
Prohibited Firearms

7. Prohibited firearms include most automatic, military firearms, and short-barrelled handguns. Prohibited firearms are:

    (a) handguns that:
        (i) have a barrel equal to or less than 105 mm (approximately 4.1 inches) in length; or
        (ii) are designed or adapted to discharge a 25 or 32 calibre cartridge, unless these handguns are listed in the Regulations Prescribing Exclusions From Certain Definitions of the Criminal Code (International Sporting Competition Handguns), and are for use in international sporting competitions governed by the rules of the International Shooting Sport Federation;
    (b) firearms adapted from rifles or shotguns, whether by sawing, cutting, or any other alteration, and that as adapted are:
        (i) less than 660 mm (approximately 25.74 inches) in length; or
        (ii) 660 mm (approximately 25.74 inches) or more in length but have a barrel less than 457 mm (approximately 17.82 inches) in length.
    (c) automatic firearms, even if they have been altered to discharge only one projectile with each pull of the trigger; or
    (d) any firearm that is prescribed to be a prohibited firearm as listed in the Regulations Prescribing Certain Firearms and Other Weapons, Components and Parts of Weapons, Accessories, Cartridge Magazines, Ammunition and Projectiles as Prohibited, Restricted or Non-restricted.
    Note: (b) (i) (ii) Length means total length of firearm including the barrel.


Restricted Firearm:
Restricted Firearms

8. Restricted firearms are:

    (a) handguns that are not prohibited firearms;
    (b) firearms that are semi-automatic, centre-fire, have a barrel less than 470 mm long (approximately 18.33 inches), and are not prohibited firearms;
    (c) firearms that are designed or adapted to be fired when reduced to a length of less than 660 mm (approximately 25.74 inches) by folding, telescoping, or otherwise; or
    (d) any firearm that is prescribed to be a restricted firearm as listed in the Regulations Prescribing Certain Firearms and Other Weapons, Components and Parts of Weapons, Accessories, Cartridge Magazines, Ammunition and Projectiles as Prohibited, Restricted or Non-restricted.


Valid purposes include:

    (a) hunting during the applicable hunting season;
    (b) use in competitions;
    (c) repair;
    (d) re-enactments;
    (e) in transit movement (i.e., moving in the most direct route possible from point A to point B, through Canada); or
    (f) protection against wildlife in remote areas.




 

tomahawk6

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Thanks. I have a permit to carry but I think I can find a US dealer that will ship the firearm to a dealer in Anchorage and avoid the problems I would face in Canada. Thanks
 

SeaKingTacco

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tomahawk6 said:
Thanks. I have a permit to carry but I think I can find a US dealer that will ship the firearm to a dealer in Anchorage and avoid the problems I would face in Canada. Thanks

That is probably the best bet, T6. You are really just asking for a rough time at the border with CBSA, if you bring a pistol. You miss one step in the paperwork and they will likely confiscate it and you may find yourself inadmissable to Canada.
 

AmmoTech90

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tomahawk6 said:
Thanks. I have a permit to carry but I think I can find a US dealer that will ship the firearm to a dealer in Anchorage and avoid the problems I would face in Canada. Thanks

Good idea.  Your permit to carry doesn't mean anything in Canada.
 

daftandbarmy

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AmmoTech90 said:
Good idea.  Your permit to carry doesn't mean anything in Canada.

If you weren't already aware, you can go direct from Bellingham to Alaska, and vice versa, by the most excellent 'Alaska Marine Highway'. http://dot.alaska.gov/amhs/

They used to stop in Prince Rupert, which would make the gun thing an issue, but I understand they've now stopped that for various reasons related to apparently inadequate security levels

Alaska Marine Highway System no longer sailing to Prince Rupert, British Columbia
https://www.webcenter11.com/content/news/Alaska-Marine-Highway-System-no-longer-sailing-to-Prince-Rupert-British-Columbia-559534821.html

It's one of the best ferry trips I've ever taken, seriously. Great scenery and whale watching, pretty good amenities, and you can book your vehicle there and back in advance. Obviously, the gun thing will be an issue if you decide to drive to Alaska through BC then take the ferry back, or vice versa.

 

tomahawk6

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Good suggestion but isn't it quicker tripwise to cut through Canada ? I took the ferry when it ended at Prince Rupert. Then I took the railroad from there to Toronto and then hopped a flight to the States. Fun trip where I played bridge with some fellow travelers all the way to TO. Fun trip and lots of scenery until the boring vistas of fields.  ;D
 

daftandbarmy

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tomahawk6 said:
Good suggestion but isn't it quicker tripwise to cut through Canada ? I took the ferry when it ended at Prince Rupert. Then I took the railroad from there to Toronto and then hopped a flight to the States. Fun trip where I played bridge with some fellow travelers all the way to TO. Fun trip and lots of scenery until the boring vistas of fields.  ;D

It's about a 37 hour drive from Vancouver, BC to Juneau, Alaska, 2639kms. I'd prefer to let the sailors convey me in comfort.

https://www.google.ca/search?ei=YgZPXs-AKNja-gSbn5roBg&q=distance+from+vancouver+to+juneau+alaska&oq=distance+from+vancouver+to+juneau+alaska&gs_l=psy-ab.3..0j0i333.8211.9700..10398...0.3..0.94.688.9......0....1..gws-wiz.......0i71j0i7i30.pol7ZvBye2Q&ved=0ahUKEwjPubuZleHnAhVYrZ4KHZuPBm0Q4dUDCAo&uact=5#spf=1582237270252
 

tomahawk6

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Right now the plan is to tow a U haul, 2 dogs and the wife, so I am hoping for the best. :rofl:
 
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