• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

The WTF News Files

OldSolduer

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
3,865
Points
1,110
Why?? Just....why?? To spite your face??

Meet the completely tattooed Brazilian who removed his nose, added horns and reshaped his ears to resemble an 'orc'

De Oliveira began by stretching out his ear lobes; then injecting ink into his eyes turning them black; adding horns to his head; replacing his teeth with vampire dentures; and even splitting his tongue in half.

He eventually covered his facial tattoos by dying his skin blue and had his ears re-shaped to resemble those of an orc – a race of monstrous humanoids who represent the corrupted versions of elves and men in J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings”.

“But I would have to say that the most life-impacting, impacting modification I've done was with my nose,” he said, explaining he had it surgically removed in March and it’s taken several months to heal.

“It's still very painful because when I take a shower a lot of water goes into my nose.”

o_O
Freakin idiot. Face palm emoji is needed :cautious:
 

CBH99

Army.ca Veteran
Donor
Reaction score
1,042
Points
1,090
Why?? Just....why?? To spite your face??

Meet the completely tattooed Brazilian who removed his nose, added horns and reshaped his ears to resemble an 'orc'

De Oliveira began by stretching out his ear lobes; then injecting ink into his eyes turning them black; adding horns to his head; replacing his teeth with vampire dentures; and even splitting his tongue in half.

He eventually covered his facial tattoos by dying his skin blue and had his ears re-shaped to resemble those of an orc – a race of monstrous humanoids who represent the corrupted versions of elves and men in J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Lord of the Rings”.

“But I would have to say that the most life-impacting, impacting modification I've done was with my nose,” he said, explaining he had it surgically removed in March and it’s taken several months to heal.

“It's still very painful because when I take a shower a lot of water goes into my nose.”
I’ve never wanted to see a Tinder profile so badly in my life!
 

ModlrMike

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Donor
Reaction score
838
Points
960

PMedMoe

Army.ca Legend
Donor
Reaction score
735
Points
940
"According to a source, the man was a collector of military memorabilia and somehow "slipped and fell" onto the round."

Suuuure he did...while naked. :ROFLMAO:
 

Blackadder1916

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1,080
Points
1,160
Humour of "where no man has gone before" . . . a staple of medics everywhere.

While I've not personally seen any foreign objects lodged in the rectum (I don't count the times I assisted at 'general officer brain scans'*), I have heard some good stories. The only one that I had a passing connection to was in the late 1970s in Eqypt. GI complaints were common and someone with a case of "the gut" was probably the most frequently presented at the Health Support Unit (HSU), so much so that a simple case without any complications or co-morbidity was usually handled by the Med As and didn't necessarily need to be seen by an MO. The rx was fairly standard - clear fluids and no solids for 24 to 48 hours (the most important), rest (that didn't mean excused duty), anti-emetics and anti-diarrheals prn - pretty simple. But there were always a few who did not follow the advice, especially that of "no solids". You'd invariably see them in the mess hall a couple of hours after being on sick parade, scoffing down a hearty lunch and then again on sick parade a day or two later complaining that it's not getting any better. The individual of the story was one such - it didn't matter how many times he was told "no solids - clear fluids only" - he'd be eating within hours of leaving the HSU. After repeated visits on sick parade, "in a joking manner", (so stated for legal reasons) it was suggested that he stick a cork up his ass because that would be the only way to stop his diarrhea. Well, that seemed to get the point across to him, or so we thought until several days later he showed up on sick parade and asked when should the cork come out. While there was a brief moment of jocularity, that quickly transformed into a WTF do we do now moment since it was well past the stage when it could be handled by one of us Med As and the SMO was not known for her sense of humour. As we were only established for primary care, we had to send him down to the POLLOG hospital for removal of the cork.



*general officer brain scans - what we called the rigid sigmoidoscopy that was part of the annual medical examination at NDMC required for every GOFO.
 
Top