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Managing a Top Performer Who Alienates Their Colleagues

daftandbarmy

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I know you've never seen this happen, but :)


Managing a Top Performer Who Alienates Their Colleagues


Summary.

Managing a dominant personality is a challenge, especially if they’re alienating their colleagues. For starters, you need to provide some tough feedback. Tell this person how they’re perceived, and explain the consequences of their behavior. Say, “In order to live up to your talents, you must learn to behave differently. Otherwise, you won’t accomplish your goals.” Next, you need to coach and help your aggressive star develop empathy. Engage your employee in active inquiry by asking them to step into the shoes of their peers. Ask them to consider their colleagues’ perspectives and viewpoints. Say: “What matters to this person on your team? What is that person’s biggest concern? Is there any common ground?” Your objective is to foster social and self-awareness.


Managing a Top Performer Who Alienates Their Colleagues
 

Good2Golf

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That presumes the assessment of ‘top performer’ is aligned to the company’s business goals and (first-order) associated values....and....if it is, then does the company genuinely care about the other employees, or are they more focused on the numbers that ‘doesn’t like to play top performer’ brings in. If ‘top performer’s’ assessment is not aligned with the company business goals and values, then why are they still around?

My ‘pragmatic realistic’ viewpoint (ie. cynical), is that by far, most companies demonstrably care most about the numbers, and accept as a ‘cost of doing business’ that some ‘top performers’ may have an ‘acceptable divergence’ from the stated corporate values...
 

mariomike

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Try riding 2080 hours a year cooped up with a Top Performer. :)
 

daftandbarmy

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That presumes the assessment of ‘top performer’ is aligned to the company’s business goals and (first-order) associated values....and....if it is, then does the company genuinely care about the other employees, or are they more focused on the numbers that ‘doesn’t like to play top performer’ brings in. If ‘top performer’s’ assessment is not aligned with the company business goals and values, then why are they still around?

My ‘pragmatic realistic’ viewpoint (ie. cynical), is that by far, most companies demonstrably care most about the numbers, and accept as a ‘cost of doing business’ that some ‘top performers’ may have an ‘acceptable divergence’ from the stated corporate values...

We've recently seen some of our clients get rid of a couple of people like this as the collateral damage was too much to handle.

They were relieved to discover that the world did not end after they cleaned house. Also, some good leaders stepped up knowing that the climate had changed, and that their bosses finally showed some gumption.
 
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