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CSOR and JTF2 Physical Fitness tests - what they are, minimum standard, etc

Jarnhamar

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For the pre-CSOR selection fitness test run by PSP is the (40+) sit ups done from an unsupported position or is someone stepping on your feet?
 

punkd

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From the supported. Either feet under a bar or someone holding your feet. Depends where you do the test.
 

armyguy1

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I have seen the PDF files for the Pre-Selection Training Programs for both CSOR and JTF2.

I am just wondering if anybody has followed these programs, if so I would like to know which one people have found to be a better program to follow. If somebody wanted to become a member of one of the special operations teams/units but didn't know which one to go for yet which program would be the best to follow?
 

Sythen

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If you're in the military, the PSP apparently have a program to get you ready for selection. If you're not in the military yet, do not worry about it.
 

PuckChaser

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armyguy1 said:
I have seen the PDF files for the Pre-Selection Training Programs for both CSOR and JTF2.

I am just wondering if anybody has followed these programs, if so I would like to know which one people have found to be a better program to follow. If somebody wanted to become a member of one of the special operations teams/units but didn't know which one to go for yet which program would be the best to follow?

You've got 5 years to go before you even think about applying, maybe be patient?

Whats the best program to use? The program that gets you fit and through selection. Everyone's body is different.
 

armyguy1

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I am aware of how long I have before I can even consider applying, but I want a challenge and I have always lived my life with the attitude that if you reach for the stars you might just land on the moon. If the special operations units are the most elite and have the toughest training, then I would rather train to their standards so I am better prepared for regular military standards. If I train like them then it might just make me a better candidate or better at my job in the regular forces. If I have to pick between the most elite or the bare minimum I will pick the most elite every time.

I am just trying to set the standard high for myself.
 

Sythen

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armyguy1 said:
I am just trying to set the standard high for myself.

You and everyone else. There is a difference between gym fit and being tough, which you won't learn until you start doing actual military training. Trust me, just keep yourself in shape and once you actually experience what training is, then make your decision.
 

LieutenantPrivate

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What Sythen says is true, however, theres nothing wrong with training hard and setting your standards high.  Just keep your short-term goals realistic and take care of those first.

As for the PSP manuals.  Im sure the CSOR one was designed to help you succeed at CSOR selection and the same for the jtf2 one.  So do which ever one you feel like going for....mind you, you will be doing it all over again (probably) once you meet the minimum time requirements to even try for selection.

Have at er and good luck dude.
 

AmmoTech90

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It's all in the position of the hand while doing pushups.

For CSOR turn them slightly in, for JTF-2 turn them slightly out.
 

The_Falcon

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The selection manuals are specifically tailored to passing the selection phase the each organization IE the CSOR one is specifically tailored to help you pass CSOR selection not JTF2.  They aren't really meant as general fitness programs.  The correct way (as relayed to me through PSP and recruiters of those units) to use them is, make sure you have a well developed fitness level in multiple facets (cardio endurance, power, speed, muscular endurance, strenght etc) and then start the program so that you finish just prior to going on selection. 
 

Old Sweat

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Hatchet Man said:
The selection manuals are specifically tailored to passing the selection phase the each organization IE the CSOR one is specifically tailored to help you pass CSOR selection not JTF2.  They aren't really meant as general fitness programs.  The correct way (as relayed to me through PSP and recruiters of those units) to use them is, make sure you have a well developed fitness level in multiple facets (cardio endurance, power, speed, muscular endurance, strenght etc) and then start the program so that you finish just prior to going on selection.

A little bird once whispered to me that the minimum standard won't get you through selection for either unit.
 

Haggis

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Hatchet Man said:
The selection manuals are specifically tailored to passing the selection phase the each organization IE the CSOR one is specifically tailored to help you pass CSOR selection not JTF2.  They aren't really meant as general fitness programs.  The correct way (as relayed to me through PSP and recruiters of those units) to use them is, make sure you have a well developed fitness level in multiple facets (cardio endurance, power, speed, muscular endurance, strenght etc) and then start the program so that you finish just prior to going on selection.

Having done the JTF2 pre selection programme (just for a challenge) I can say three things;

1.  It's time consuming so you should get your supervisors's buy-in before embarking on it.
2.  It's tiring.  It's hard on the body.  You will be dragging your butt and not on your "A" Game at work some days.  See point 1; and
3.  You need to be in much better than average (for the general CF population) physical shape before beginning or you risk injury.

It will get you into really good shape but, as per points 1 and 2, maintaining it could be a challenge if you don't work "out there".
 

The_Falcon

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Old Sweat said:
A little bird once whispered to me that the minimum standard won't get you through selection for either unit.

I wouldn't doubt that either.  Also the things these books don't help with is the mental aspect.  After 2-3 days of torture, it doesn't really matter how fit you are if mentally you can't handle it anymore.
 

xxmixkexx

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Hatchet Man said:
  After 2-3 days of torture, it doesn't really matter how fit you are if mentally you can't handle it anymore.

To me that sounds like something too lazy to train hard would say.  If you are extremely fit the suffering they put you through is not nearly as hard compared to if you are unfit.  That helps you recover much faster and have more energy.  Just my opinion tho.
 
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aesop081

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xxmixkexx said:
To me that sounds like something too lazy to train hard would say. 

You're obviously not grasping what was said.

You can be the most fit, physicaly checked-out guy in the world, but if your brain cannot handle being pushed, you still won't make it.
 

Jarnhamar

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xxmixkexx said:
To me that sounds like something too lazy to train hard would say. 

Or someone with an insight into how these selection process's go.
 

Sythen

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CDN Aviator said:
You can be the most fit, physicaly checked-out guy in the world, but if your brain cannot handle being pushed, you still won't make it.

Which comes back to what I said. Major difference between tough and fit. Everyone thinks they're tough until they actually meet some resistance.
 
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aesop081

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Sythen said:
Which comes back to what I said. Major difference between tough and fit. Everyone thinks they're tough until they actually meet some resistance.

Oh, i know. But mister "xxmixkexx" did not seem to understand that, it was "too lazy to train hard". I guess he stopped understanding between 2010 and today.

xxmixkexx said:
haha the course is a fair bit more intense then bmq :p  You can be in the best shape in the world and still struggle, it is really a mental course, everyone can walk all day. 
 

xxmixkexx

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Hey man people changed I have learned more.  Now I realize being the fittest person in the platoon makes it so much easier on you.  Generally you only go as hard as the weakest quarter of people.
 
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