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Cpl Jordan Anderson, 3PPCLI: 04 July 2007 (GO!!!)

geo

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Awright GO!!!

Well done U of M for doing the right thing for the right reasons.

Often, it's the little things in life that matter & for his family, friends & comrades this is HUGE!

Thanks Tony for sharing this

CHIMO!
 

HItorMiss

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Jordan worked hard for that. Well done to U of M for granting him this degree.

Now We all know he is up there telling God how he is running the place wrong and how to make it better....Primary Reserve Angels my Ass!!!!  ;)
 

3rd Herd

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Congratulations to the University of Manitoba for doing the right thing. As Geo indicated this is Huge, first since World War Two and an excellent response to GO's dedication to his studies.

Maybe ArmyVern or one of the other mod's can post something on the scholarships details in the next day or so. Who knows it might be a great place to spend a little coin. ;)


Further News Articles:

U of M to award posthumous degree to fallen soldier
Cpl. Jordan Anderson, raised in N.W.T. and was based in Edmonton, was taking BA
http://www.cbc.ca/canada/edmonton/story/2007/10/16/anderson-degree.html

The University of Manitoba plans to award a posthumous degree to a soldier for the first time at convocation ceremonies this week, to an Edmonton-based corporal who was killed in Afghanistan in July.

Cpl. Jordan Anderson — a member of the 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry — had been taking his bachelor of arts degree through the university's military support office before he died.
George MacLean, the acting head of the university's political studies department, said Anderson's friends and family members contacted the university and made the case for Anderson.

"He was very close to completing his degree: in fact, he had completed all of his major degree requirements. There were a couple of courses left over that were electives that he hadn't completed," MacLean told CBC News on Monday..............................."

Edit to add from the U of M website: http://myuminfo.umanitoba.ca/index.asp?sec=209&too=100&eve=1000&id=13959

POSTHUMOUS DEGREE TO BE CONFERRED ON FALLEN CANADIAN SOLDIER
Tuesday, October 16, 2007 2:54 PM 
Widow and other family members to attend ceremony. 

On Thursday, October 18, 2007, the University of Manitoba will award a posthumous degree to a Canadian soldier killed in Afghanistan earlier this year.

Cpl. Jordan Anderson, of the Edmonton-based 3rd Battalion of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, was killed on July 4, 2007 along with five other Canadian soldiers and an Afghan interpreter when their armoured vehicle struck a hidden roadside bomb as they were traveling near Kandahar. 

Anderson was a political studies major completing his arts degree through the Canadian Forces Program at the University of Manitoba.

Cpl. Anderson’s wife, Amanda Anderson, will attend the ceremony and will be accepting her late husband’s parchment. Other family members are also expected to be in attendance.

This will be the first posthumous degree conferred posthumously upon a serving member of the military killed in wartime, although there were precedents at other Canadian institutions during the Second World War.

Members of Anderson’s military unit are working to set up at least one scholarship in his name at the University of Manitoba, likely an entrance scholarship in political studies and another for students later in the program.

Media note: Amanda Anderson will give a limited number of interviews to media previous to the ceremony at approximately 2:30 pm, in advance of the procession of graduands. This will occur near the robing area outside the convocation hall. The family will then be afforded private time and media access will be discouraged. 

For more information, contact: Dr. George Maclean, political studies, at 204-474-6621
 

armyvern

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3rd PM inbound.

I'll post the re-written draft tomorrow -- if I receive the go-aheads on the suggested amendments.  ;)

Vern
 

3rd Herd

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Further MSM:
The Usual Disclaimer:
http://www.canada.com/edmontonjournal/news/cityplus/story.html?id=38e2305e-670b-4ea1-8bab-ef95a87da0d8&k=18972

Posthumous degree for soldier
Cpl. Jordan Anderson close to graduating from University of Manitoba when he was killed in Kandahar 
Jamie Hall
The Edmonton Journal
Wednesday, October 17, 2007


EDMONTON - Cpl. Jordan Anderson's home office in Edmonton has remained largely untouched since he was killed in July by a roadside bomb near Kandahar.

The papers he wrote for his university degree are still piled neatly on the desk.

"I go in that room a lot," says Anderson's widow, Amanda. "It gives me comfort."

Education, she says, was paramount to her husband, whose goal was to eventually earn a master's degree in strategic studies and become an intelligence officer in the military.

When he was killed, he was working toward that goal and was close to completing his bachelor of arts degree through the university's military support program at the University of Manitoba.

So close, in fact, the university will award the degree posthumously during Thursday's fall convocation in Winnipeg.

It's the first time since the Korean War a Canadian university has given a posthumous degree to a member of the forces killed in action.

"It's just wonderful," said Amanda, who will accept the degree on her husband's behalf.

"Jordan worked so hard for this degree. So many times he would come home after being in the field for weeks and sit down and write a paper late into the night on some obscure topic.

"He was determined to get it, no matter what else was going on in his life," she said.

George MacLean, the acting head of the university's political studies department, never met Anderson. But he happened to be reviewing Anderson's academic file the day he and five of his fellow soldiers were killed when their armoured vehicle struck a massive roadside bomb near Kandahar.

MacLean noticed that Anderson, 25, was an exceptional student and was close to completing his degree.

"He had completed all of his major degree requirements," said MacLean. "So when we were approached about awarding the degree posthumously, there was certainly a good case to be made for it."

Anderson's military family was keenly aware of his devotion to education and, through an online military forum called army.ca, raised enough money to start two scholarships in his name at the university.

One will be for students entering the political studies program and the second for a student in the middle of the program.

Amanda said news of the degree, and the scholarships, has helped with her struggle to find something positive in the aftermath of the tragedy.

"That's what Jordan was about," she said.

"He always said to me, 'We have to focus on the positive; you can't focus on the casualties, you have to focus on the good we're doing over there (in Afghanistan.)'

"He's getting his degree, and there are going to be two scholarships in his name. That's positive."

jhall@thejournal.canwest.com

http://canadianpress.google.com/article/ALeqM5goPpCPspLGI0jB8bA-F_lqsjrVlw

Canadian soldier killed in Afghanistan to receive posthumous degree
17 hours ago

WINNIPEG - The University of Manitoba will award a posthumous bachelor of arts degree to an Edmonton-based soldier who was killed in Afghanistan earlier this year.

Cpl. Jordan Anderson, 25, a member of the 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, had been pursuing his degree through the university's military support office.

He had completed nearly all program requirements when he and five other soldiers, along with an Afghan interpreter, were killed by a roadside bomb west of Kandahar city July 4.

"He did very well in his courses," said George MacLean, the acting head of the U of M's political studies department, who noted that Anderson had intended to pursue an advanced degree in political science and international relations.

He said the decision to award the degree was made after Anderson's friends and family members contacted the university.

He said Anderson died the same day he spoke to the university about expanding his education program.

"I know in many cases it was very emotional for people because you couldn't help but think about the overwhelming nature of this individual, who, like the 70 other soldiers who have been killed over there were killed in the prime of life," he said.

MacLean also said the granting of the degree is a first for the institution.

"We have granted degrees posthumously in the past, but never one of this nature to a member of the Canadian Forces."

Anderson's widow, Amanda Anderson, will receive the degree of behalf of her husband at a convocation ceremony in Winnipeg on Thursday. It's expected that members of the military will also be in attendance.

Maj. Erik Liebert of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry in Edmonton says events like this are significant.

"Canadians pay attention to what's going on overseas and watch as soldiers return home in better or worse circumstances. What doesn't get a lot of acknowledgment is the work done by individuals to better themselves and better others. This is certainly a case where Cpl. Anderson put a lot of time and effort into improving himself."

Liebert said he hopes the ceremony will make more soldiers aware of university support programs available under the Canadian Forces.

"A long-serving soldier can receive up to $20,000 of subsidized education," he said.

Anderson, who was born in Iqaluit, the capital of Nunavut, spent most of his childhood in Inuvik, N.W.T.

He is believed to be the first northerner to die in Afghanistan.

Two scholarships have also been established in his name.


Fallen soldier from Edmonton honoured with B.A degree
Oct, 17 2007 - 6:50 AM
http://www.630ched.com/news/news_local.cfm?cat=7428109912&rem=77177&red=80110923aPBIny&wids=410&gi=1&gm=news_local.cfm

EDMONTON - The University of Manitoba is awarding a posthumous bachelor of arts degree to an Edmonton-based soldier who was killed in Afghanistan.
   
Corporal Jordan Anderson was a member of the 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. The 25 year old man had completed nearly all the requirements of his B-A through the university's military support office when he was killed in a roadside blast July 4th.
   
The degree will be presented to his widow, Amanda Anderson, at a convocation ceremony tomorrow.
   
George MacLean, the acting head of the U of M's political studies department, says the full-time soldier did very well in his courses and was highly thought of by the university. He says the decision to award the degree was made after Anderson's friends and family members contacted the U of M.
MacLean also says it will mark the first time the institution has granted a posthumous degree to a member of the Canadian Forces.

Major Erik Liebert of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry says the degree will help shed more light on the lives of Canadian soldiers.

Two scholarships have also been established in Anderson's name

(Details of which will be posted on site tomorrow, Thurdays October 18th, 2007)
 

observor 69

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Lines that demonstrate more of the positive that can come out of this sadness.

"Maj. Erik Liebert of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry in Edmonton says events like this are significant.

"Canadians pay attention to what's going on overseas and watch as soldiers return home in better or worse circumstances. What doesn't get a lot of acknowledgment is the work done by individuals to better themselves and better others. This is certainly a case where Cpl. Anderson put a lot of time and effort into improving himself."

Liebert said he hopes the ceremony will make more soldiers aware of university support programs available under the Canadian Forces."



 

Sig_Des

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This is a great thing that's been done for a good friend.

Jordan worked hard for his degree, and I know he was eager to finish his studies.

Kudo's to all involved in getting the degree awarded, and the work put into the scholarship. I KNOW he would have been extremely proud.

 

GAP

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University honours slain soldier-scholar
By SHANNON VANRAES, SUN MEDIA
Article Link

It wasn't easy to do, but Amanda Anderson felt it was an honour to accept a degree from the University of Manitoba on behalf of her late husband -- a Canadian soldier killer in Afghanistan this summer.

The university posthumously conferred a bachelor of arts degree in political science to Cpl. Jordan Anderson, of the Edmonton-based Third Battalion of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, at its convocation ceremony yesterday.

"He loved learning ... he always wanted to learn something," Amanda said before the convocation, adding her husband had lofty goals, including becoming an intelligence officer in the Canadian military, which he fully expected to reach.

"It is with great sorrow we will never see him reach his goals," Amanda said while fighting back tears.

Although she said closure is a difficult thing to find, the 31-year-old widow was buoyed by the amount of support she has received from the public, the university and her late husband's friends and colleagues, many of whom attended yesterday's ceremony.

This is the first time the school has posthumously awarded a degree to a serving member of the military killed in wartime.

"It's pretty rare when this happens," said George MacLean, acting head of the political studies department.

MacLean added the soldier spoke with university officials about continuing his education the day he was killed by a roadside bomb, along with five other Canadian soldiers and an Afghan interpreter.

"He was very close to reaching his degree ... basically all of the major components were complete," he said, adding Jordan was an extremely dedicated student who planned on doing post-graduate work.

A bursary has been set up at the university to honour Jordan's memory.
More on link
 

3rd Herd

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The usual disclaimer:
Thu, October 18, 2007
Soldier given degree after killed in Afghanistan
By The Canadian Press
http://www.edmontonsun.com/News/Canada/2007/10/18/4587107.html

WINNIPEG — When Cpl. Jordan Anderson wasn’t working in the dangerous terrain of Afghanistan, he had his nose in a book, working on his university courses.
On Thursday, three months after he was killed by a roadside bomb in the war-torn country, Anderson became the first Canadian soldier since the Korean War to get a posthumous degree.

The 25-year-old was remembered by friends as a dedicated soldier, and by his widow as a man with an intense hunger for knowledge.

“He would read something in the newspaper ... and he’d go home and he’d look it up on the Internet,” Amanda Anderson told reporters as she fought back tears before accepting the arts degree on her husband’s behalf from the University of Manitoba.

“I wish it wasn’t me doing it, I wish it was him. But I’ll do it. It’s an honour.”

The young widow accepted the degree alongside hundreds of graduates during a convocation ceremony that looked like any other, save for a cluster of military uniforms near the front row.

Some of her husband’s colleagues from the Edmonton-based 3rd Battalion of the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry came to the event in a show of support for the young man who was often seen with his nose in the books.

“Every time we’d see him, he’d be working on a paper,” said Cpl. Adam Bowness, who served alongside Anderson on a previous mission to Afghanistan in 2002.

“Most of the guys, we’d get out of the field and we’d go party, have a good time. But he’d be right in the books right away.”

Anderson pursued his studies online through the university’s distance education program while serving overseas. He had completed nearly all the program requirements for his political science major when he and five other soldiers, along with an Afghan interpreter, were killed by a roadside bomb west of Kandahar city July 4.

His colleagues got the ball rolling to ensure his degree would be granted.

“It was clear this was a dedicated student who clearly would have gone on to do graduate work and do it well,” said Prof. George Maclean, acting head of the political science department.

The university has set up a bursary in Anderson’s name, which will fund two students each year — one in the military and one cadet.

Anderson was born in Iqaluit and spent most of his childhood in Inuvik, N.W.T. He is believed to be the first northerner to die in Afghanistan.

He also had clear career goals in mind.

“Jordan had lofty goals and every expectation of meeting them,” said his widow.

“His intentions were to ... climb through the officers’ ranks and ultimately become an intelligence officer. It is with great sorrow that we will never see him achieve this goal.”

When he wasn’t poring over university books and papers, Anderson had a wry sense of humour and a laugh that made him stand out. His colleagues say Anderson would have been all smiles had he lived to attend his convocation ceremony.

“He’d probably have his trademark cackling laugh and he’d be grinning ear to ear,” said Cpl. Jeff Black.

“That’s the kind of guy he was.”
 

Danjanou

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More coverage here including photos of the convocation ceremony

http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/life/story/4060696p-4664471c.html

Reproduced with the usual caveats et cetera:

AMANDA Anderson barely held back her tears as she prepared to receive her husband Jordan's posthumous degree Thursday.

"It'll be an honour," she said in a brief interview moments before the University of Manitoba fall convocation began.

"I wish it wasn't me doing it, I wish it was him. I'll do it for him," Anderson said.

Cpl. Jordan Anderson died in a roadside bombing in Afghanistan in early July.

He'd been completing a distance education degree in political studies through U of M's military support office, and was very close to finishing when he died. "It was elective credits that were left," Anderson said

U of M awarded Jordan Anderson a posthumous degree, the first time the university has ever given a degree to an active soldier killed in wartime.

Several family members accompanied his widow from Alberta Thursday, and the audience at the convocation at the Church of the Rock was speckled with uniforms, from enlisted soldiers who'd served and buddied with Jordan Anderson, to senior officers.

"The regiment made sure some of his closest friends could be here," Anderson said. "The interest has been amazing from the general public.
"It was his friends -- they were the ones who contacted the university."

Prof. George MacLean, acting head of political studies, persuaded the university's senate to take the unprecedented step. Anderson had completed all his political science courses, and had hoped to go on to graduate school and become an intelligence officer.

"He loved learning," said Anderson. Her husband would read something in the newspaper, then go to other sources to learn as much about a subject as he could, she recalled.

"Everyone in the military support office has been terrific over the past five years," she said. "It's something he wanted to do -- I'll finish it for him." Jordan Anderson's friends have raised $10,000 to establish two bursaries in his memory.

"He was always doing some kind of homework," said Cpl. Jeff Black with a smile. "Once he got his mind on something, you couldn't shake him.
"He was an easygoing guy, but he was the most dedicated soldier I've ever seen," said Black, who served with Anderson in Edmonton as a member of the Third Battalion of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry.

"It's a great honour being asked to come here," said Black.

"He was a joy to talk to. He was (of) above-average intelligence," said Cpl. Adam Bowness, a friend from Anderson's first of two tours of duty in Afghanistan.

"We were working basically out of a trench for six months," Bowness said. "He wanted to be an intelligence officer, and he wanted to be a graduate student.

Black said that if Anderson could have been at convocation Thursday, "He'd probably have his trademark cackling laugh, and be grinning ear to ear."

The fall convocation was moved to the Church of the Rock because of an ongoing strike by support service workers at U of M.
Environmentalist Prof. Louis Fortier and educator Don Robertson received honorary degrees as 1,271 students graduated. Among them were the first six master of arts students to graduate in school psychology -- in such high demand that each student has already been recruited and hired, all in Manitoba. "We're not surprised; the school psychologist is a valuable team member contributing to a healthy, functioning community, and these are top-notch students," said Prof. Barry Mallin, co-ordinator of the U of M's school psychology program.

"School systems today are asked to respond to the needs of children with highly diverse and complex issues," Mallin said. "Children with learning and behavioural problems, issues of cognitive functioning, health, emotional and family concerns and the occasional crisis are all part of the job."
nick.martin@freepress.mb.ca

Widow's grateful words
JORDAN'S commitment and appreciation of lifelong learning was instilled in him at an early age. The fact that he was within a few credits of obtaining his bachelor's degree while working full-time in the Canadian Forces, with two deployments to Afghanistan, and numerous exercises away from his home base, is a testament to his perseverance and dedication.

Jordan could not have succeeded without the fantastic support from his partners in education. Appreciation needs to be extended to the University of Manitoba and the Canadian Forces for offering an educational program with so many supports for success. The flexibility of the program, coupled with the counsel from the Military Support Office, made the goal of a university degree attainable.

Jordan had lofty goals, and every expectation of meeting them. After he earned his degree, his intentions were to obtain his master's in strategic studies, climb through the officers' ranks, and ultimately become an intelligence officer.
It is with great sorrow that we'll never see him achieve his goal.

A bursary entitled On The Ramp has been established at the University of Manitoba in Jordan's name. This bursary will be awarded to two students, one a serving member of the Canadian Forces, and one a cadet. The bursary is open to full-time, part-time, or as Jordan did, distance education students. Often during downtime in the army, Jordan would share his knowledge of history and politics with his comrades. This bursary will be his legacy for years to come, sharing his passion for learning.

We are truly grateful for the honour of receiving this bachelor's degree. A sincere thank-you to the University of Manitoba, the political science department, and the Military Support Office. Thank you to his regiment, Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, for their work in making this happen. We also wish to extend our heartfelt appreciation to his friends at Army.ca for making representation to the university, in order for him to receive his degree posthumously, and for the work in establishing the bursary in Jordan's name.

We would also like to extend our best wishes to all the graduates. We are honoured to be part of today's convocation.
-- Amanda Anderson
 

momgo

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From Jordan’s Dad, Mom, Brothers Ben, Matt and Sam….thank you to all of you for your support and kind words.

To Army.ca; special appreciation is held up for you for all of your hard work planning, and making Jordan’s case to the U of M.  I can think of nothing more fitting than to honour Jordan and highlight his legacy with his degree and bursaries.  He would have been proud to earn his place on the podium. 

I truly hope that other members of the army become aware of the support available to them if they choose to further their studies.  Learning is always important, without it one becomes stale, stagnant.  Learning keeps us sharp, full of life and your experiences become your history when you have the tools to share it.

Thank you again from all of us, we will remember Jordan as our son and brother, and one worthy of the comrade ship offered by members of the military family and especially demonstrated here on this site.  We are comforted by your affection, acceptance and understanding of our son.  We know that he died among friends.

Sheila (Momgo) 
 

Yrys

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Thank you -Skeletor- !

I'm glad the university gave him his diploma posthumously.
 

*star

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Thank you Skeletor.

I appreciate you taking the time to photograph and post Jordan's plaque.

Its support like this that gives me comfort.

*star
Mrs.GO!!!
 
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