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C3 Howitzer Replacement

daftandbarmy

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Be interesting to see what field telephones and wire would look like

In another time and place I recall taking over a location where a previous unit was using the phone to communicate with an urban OP, and used a fax machine to transmit patrol programs to Bn HQ.

Oddly enough, they'd had a few contacts.

We replaced the phone with field phones, and had hard copies of the weekly patrol program delivered on regular chopper flights.

Never had an issue after that ;)
 

Colin Parkinson

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If field telephones and wire do not produce a strong enough EM/EW signature, then they have a role to play in modern conflict. If an energized wire shows up clearly, then it's bad news. but i am guessing they be hard to pick up thanks to the lower voltages, but it should be tested.
 

quadrapiper

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If field telephones and wire do not produce a strong enough EM/EW signature, then they have a role to play in modern conflict. If an energized wire shows up clearly, then it's bad news. but i am guessing they be hard to pick up thanks to the lower voltages, but it should be tested.
Are the wires energized only when the phone's being used, or is there a carrier signal/charge?
 

KevinB

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i never heard that.

If anything it was the Argies (who were equipped with first class night vision scopes, unlike the British forces) who got alot of head shots on our troops.
In Iraq that claim was made by Iraqi's on the USMC in Fallujah - who had optics on their M16A2's and M4's.
However the USMC's own data proved that a lot of rounds didn't go where intended either...
 

KevinB

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Are the wires energized only when the phone's being used, or is there a carrier signal/charge?
Depends on the system - you can dig them in - and get shielded cables - but that's a little beyond the standard field phone.
At the end of the day - you can find nearly anything given the time.
 

Kirkhill

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If you are going to lay cable then lay fiber.


Security​

Unlike copper cable, fiber optic cable does not transmit any signals that can be intercepted. Security breaches are also easy to detect and remedy.




What Is Fiber?​

When we talk about fiber or fiber internet, we’re talking about transmitting data by sending pulses of light through tiny glass fibers. The basic concept is the same as cable internet. The difference is that fiber cables provide more information at faster speeds over longer distances.

To put it another way: today’s websites and web-based services demand more from your home and business internet than ever before. Fiber internet is the best way to stay connected with the modern world.

Reliability​

Fiber cable is typically not affected by electrical outages, severe weather like thunderstorms or any other electrical disruptions.

Speed​

Cable networks usually offer speeds of 10-500 megabits per second, which slows down during peak hours. Fiber internet offers 1000 megabits per second (one gigabit) all the time, even during peak hours.

Bandwidth​

Traffic increases during evenings and weekends often cause cable internet to slow down significantly. Fiber networks never slow down, offering up to 1,000 times the bandwidth of cable internet.

Scalable​

With a higher demand on fast and reliable internet due to more devices, higher speeds, and heavier reliance on digital data, fiber internet will become less of an option and more of a necessity as time moves on.


And it links easily to Free Space Optics


Free-space optical technology (FSO) uses light, propagating in free space to transmit data between two points. This is useful where physical connections by means of fiber optic cable are impractical due to high costs, lengthy installations or destructive installations.

Similar to Fiber Optics, Free Space Optics uses a light emitting diode or laser as a point source for data transmission. The difference is Free Space Optics uses an energy beam through free space, whereas Fiber Optics uses an energy beam guided through an optical cable.

Free Space Optic communications may provide flexible, easy to install, and license-free line-of-sight wireless communications links. The high speed and large bandwidth offered by light wave communication technology makes FSO (Free Space Optics) very attractive as a means to meet future demand for broadband internet access and high definition television broadcasting services.

 
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Kirkhill

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Spike ER2


Features

Enhanced Engagement Range :
Surface Launch – up to 10 km
(Fiber optic data link)

Rotary Launch – up to 16 km
(RF data link)

5thGeneration Advanced Seeker:
High-resolution IR and day
sensors
Multi-spectral target tracker
(Enables sensor data fusion)
including a maritime target
tracker
Real-time sensor “hotswap”
capabilities

Increased Lethality:
Anti-tank
Anti-structure
Anti-ship
Anti-personnel


Provisioned for NCW with NLOS Engagement Capabilities:
Based on an embedded IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) for missions of third party target allocation, the system allows the firing of the missile to a grid target coordinate with no line of sight (NLOS).

Looks to me to be an un-jammable solution. 34 kg/round

A nice addition to every LAV turret. Pair or two each?
 

Colin Parkinson

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If you are going to lay cable then lay fiber.










And it links easily to Free Space Optics




and price difference, repairabilty when a tank rips up your line? For temporary hides and gun positions, likley wire and field phones are way cheaper and easier. For prepared camouflaged positions as part of a permanent defensive line, then the fiberoptic with wire backup makes sense.
 

Kirkhill

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and price difference, repairabilty when a tank rips up your line? For temporary hides and gun positions, likley wire and field phones are way cheaper and easier. For prepared camouflaged positions as part of a permanent defensive line, then the fiberoptic with wire backup makes sense.


Or for short tethers?

As to expense how expensive can it be if it used for 10 km tethers on missiles? And have you seen the price of copper these days?

Repairability?

 

Kirkhill

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The mechanical splice looks no worse than a wire butt connector.

The bigger problem for both is running the wire/fiber to find the break and hope it is in covered ground.
 

KevinB

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It is legitimately a non issue if done right.
Cable and Power Companies have those side drill's to bore across a road way several feet below - and then the cable laying machines -- using an underwater armored duct sheath for the cable/fibre.

Short of a direct hit from a bomb or shell, your not going to have issues.
 

Kirkhill

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It is legitimately a non issue if done right.
Cable and Power Companies have those side drill's to bore across a road way several feet below - and then the cable laying machines -- using an underwater armored duct sheath for the cable/fibre.

Short of a direct hit from a bomb or shell, your not going to have issues.

FOG-MPM (Fiber Optics Guided Multiple Purpose Missile) is a missile built by the Brazilian company Avibrás. Its range is about 60 km. The weight is about 34 kg. Its main use is as an anti-tank, anti-fortification and anti-helicopter missile. FOG-MPM is guided by optical fiber technology. The FOG-MPM is very flexible, can be launched from ground vehicles (Astros II MLRS),[1] ships and helicopters, and is immune to electronic measures.[2]

Could you net in a OPs using FOG UAVs? Use the UAV as a carrier for the cable to take it to the friendly "target" and plug it in at both ends? Or is that already being done?

 

KevinB

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Could you net in a OPs using FOG UAVs? Use the UAV as a carrier for the cable to take it to the friendly "target" and plug it in at both ends? Or is that already being done?

You could - but its going to be a ground overlay - and subject to any surface issues (vehicles, fragments etc).
Probably works if your in a super big hurry - but ideally you'd have them under 1M or more of earth in a protected shroud.

Defensive position stuff I am way stale on - I'm really only current on door kicking or sniping, and related matters.
 

Kirkhill

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You could - but its going to be a ground overlay - and subject to any surface issues (vehicles, fragments etc).
Probably works if your in a super big hurry - but ideally you'd have them under 1M or more of earth in a protected shroud.

Defensive position stuff I am way stale on - I'm really only current on door kicking or sniping, and related matters.

I was thinking more along the lines of an expedient comms system when laagering in for the night.

Wouldn't it be particularly useful in the Echelons (B and A rear) when they are going stationary? You might even get away with putting a spring loaded spool of fiber on each Log Vehicle and a mating receptacle. Yes, it will be vulnerable and a trip hazard but it might get rid of that big red blob in the rear.

1643308157162.png

Don't know what to make of all the TOC/TAC/Alt traffic along the axis of advance. Does kind of stick out like a sore thumb.

In fact, if I look at that image, I see a really nicely drawn arrowhead pointing directly along a road that terminates in a village.

Red blob of log area in the rear, nicely lined up with square borders.
Red line of command elements along the road.
Blue tactical dots between the command elements and the log elements.
More blue tactical dots in a screen around the command elements with flankers creating the barbs of the arrowhead.

Do you want to launch an air raid? An artillery raid? Block the advance? Or set up an ambush with a kill zone?
 

FJAG

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Seeing as how everyone else seems to be buying them...
I'm holding out for M1299. Holding out but not holding breath.

But its not a bad deal for the K9 - we could use around 60 which would put the price at $1/2 billion. Even better if we can build/assemble them in Canada like Egypt is.

🍻
 

KevinB

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I'm holding out for M1299. Holding out but not holding breath.

But its not a bad deal for the K9 - we could use around 60 which would put the price at $1/2 billion. Even better if we can build/assemble them in Canada like Egypt is.

🍻
Yeah, I saw they have let Egypt do it, so it would be a Domestic Canadian SPA, which would help support a Heavium Bde+ ;)
 
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