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British Military Current Events

So does that Sam Browne belt and khaki uniform.

Ah shit! I turned this into a uniform thread! 不

Bb24 GIF by Big Brother
 
Its not truly derailed until torques, gloves and raincoats are mentioned.
 
The truth will out ;)

Hello mate, considering the channel 4 documentary following the RAF at Lossiemouth and how great it all is, I just thought Id give an honest insight to what its like at Marham, if you do share this then please keep anonymous.
There hasnt been any hot water across most the junior rank blocks, gym and messing facilities for over a month, this was due to annual boiler maintenance. The deadline has been and gone and now Vivo are claiming there is no time frame for a fix, but the rumours are it could be as far away as November which would mean nearly 3 months without hot water. Temporary showers have been placed in a couple of carparks, but these are of shocking standard, covered in mould, not draining properly and running out of hot water themselves. On top of this, occupants were told they would not have to pay for accommodation, but this promptly turned out to be complete bollocks and any mention of unpleasant living conditions or knocking off the accommodation charge are swiftly ignored.

 
My guess is 'not much has changed'...

Call for fresh evidence on experience of women in the Armed Forces​



The Commons Defence Committee is calling for new written evidence on the experiences of women in the Armed Forces to find out whether there has been sufficient transformation since its last report was published.

A damning report released in 2021 revealed that the Ministry of Defence (MOD) is failing to protect female personnel.

The report, Protecting Those Who Protect Us: Women in the Armed Forces from Recruitment to Civilian Life, suggested several recommendations which would improve the experiences of servicewomen and female veterans.

 
Wow...

Dead soldier suffered relentless sexual harassment - Army report​


A female teenage soldier is believed to have taken her own life after relentless sexual harassment by one of her bosses, an Army investigation has found.

Royal Artillery Gunner Jaysley Beck, 19, was found dead at Larkhill Camp in Wiltshire in December 2021.

A service inquiry report, seen by the BBC, describes "an intense period of unwelcome behaviour".

"It is almost certain this was a causal factor in her death," the report found.

The behaviour from her immediate boss, continued over a period of two months preceding her death, says the report, published on Wednesday.

"Whilst this behaviour ended the week before her death, it appears that it continued to affect her and had taken a significant toll on her mental resilience and well-being," the report continues.

 
Unfortunately another case of sexual harassment.
Dead soldier suffered relentless sexual harassment - Army report

A female teenage soldier is believed to have taken her own life after relentless sexual harassment by one of her bosses, an Army investigation has found.

Royal Artillery Gunner Jaysley Beck, 19, was found dead at Larkhill Camp in Wiltshire in December 2021.
A service inquiry report, seen by the BBC, describes "an intense period of unwelcome behaviour".
"It is almost certain this was a causal factor in her death," the report found.
The behaviour from her immediate boss, continued over a period of two months preceding her death, says the report, published on Wednesday.
"Whilst this behaviour ended the week before her death, it appears that it continued to affect her and had taken a significant toll on her mental resilience and well-being," the report continues.

More in article
 
If I were god for a day I would cheerfully boil in oil just about everybody in her COC .

50 quid says some General will quote this study as a 'it's not all that bad' offering ;)

Suicide rates in the UK Armed Forces, compared with the general workforce and merchant shipping during peacetime years since 1900

Abstract​

Introduction The main objective was to compare suicide rates and their trends across the three UK Armed forces (Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force) from 1900 to 2020. Further objectives were to compare suicide rates with those in the corresponding general population and in UK merchant shipping and to discuss preventative measures.

Methods Examination of annual mortality reports and returns, death inquiry files and official statistics. The main outcome measure was the suicide rate per 100 000 population employed.

Results Since 1990, there have been significant reductions in suicide rates in each of the Armed Forces, although a non-significant increase in the Army since 2010. Compared with the corresponding general population, during the most recent decade from 2010 up to 2020, suicide rates were 73% lower in the Royal Air Force, 56% lower in the Royal Navy and 43% lower in the Army. Suicide rates have been significantly decreased in the Royal Air Force since the 1950s, in the Royal Navy since the 1970s and in the Army since the 1980s (comparisons for the Royal Navy and the Army were not available from the late 1940s to the 1960s).

During the earliest decades from 1900 to the 1930s, suicide rates in the Armed Forces were mostly quite similar or moderately increased compared with the general population, but far lower than in merchant shipping. Following legislative changes in the last 30 years, suicide rates through poisoning by gases and through firearms or explosives have fallen sharply.

Conclusions The study shows that suicide rates in the Armed Forces have been lower than in the general population over many decades. The sharp reductions in suicide rates over the last 30 years suggest the effectiveness of recent preventative measures, including reductions in access to a method of suicide and well-being initiatives.

 
50 quid says some General will quote this study as a 'it's not all that bad' offering ;)

Suicide rates in the UK Armed Forces, compared with the general workforce and merchant shipping during peacetime years since 1900

Abstract​

Introduction The main objective was to compare suicide rates and their trends across the three UK Armed forces (Royal Navy, Army and Royal Air Force) from 1900 to 2020. Further objectives were to compare suicide rates with those in the corresponding general population and in UK merchant shipping and to discuss preventative measures.

Methods Examination of annual mortality reports and returns, death inquiry files and official statistics. The main outcome measure was the suicide rate per 100 000 population employed.

Results Since 1990, there have been significant reductions in suicide rates in each of the Armed Forces, although a non-significant increase in the Army since 2010. Compared with the corresponding general population, during the most recent decade from 2010 up to 2020, suicide rates were 73% lower in the Royal Air Force, 56% lower in the Royal Navy and 43% lower in the Army. Suicide rates have been significantly decreased in the Royal Air Force since the 1950s, in the Royal Navy since the 1970s and in the Army since the 1980s (comparisons for the Royal Navy and the Army were not available from the late 1940s to the 1960s).

During the earliest decades from 1900 to the 1930s, suicide rates in the Armed Forces were mostly quite similar or moderately increased compared with the general population, but far lower than in merchant shipping. Following legislative changes in the last 30 years, suicide rates through poisoning by gases and through firearms or explosives have fallen sharply.

Conclusions The study shows that suicide rates in the Armed Forces have been lower than in the general population over many decades. The sharp reductions in suicide rates over the last 30 years suggest the effectiveness of recent preventative measures, including reductions in access to a method of suicide and well-being initiatives.

Statistics are only relevant if they measure apples to apples and not apples and oranges.

The Armed Forces are not comparable to the general population with regards to suicide rates. The general population have not had to face or experience the pressures typical of a deployed sailor, soldier or airman/woman. The general public doesn't:
  • have to make life or death decisions - shoot or not shoot;
  • face a hostile environment or enemy (uniform or no uniform) that wants to hurt or kill you once you leave the FOB during an operation
  • shoulder a heavy burden being the public face of a nation when deployed
  • having to balance work/life/family pressures with deployments, exercises, courses
  • deploy on months on end with limited contact home
  • having to move your family every few years
  • face economic hardship where the cost of living more be higher in the new posting
  • encounter moral dilemmas while deployed - remember the rape case in the Balkans? Taking testimony from rape victims in the Congo and Sudan while not being able to protect the innocents
  • unable to protect innocents from being killed - Rwanda, Balkans
  • having to negotiate with local warlords who are guilty of war crimes
  • and many more examples
The closest civilian example would be the first responders (police, fire fighters, paramedics, health care workers in hospitals).
I wonder what the suicide rates between the military and the first responders would be be? Are they comparable?
 
Archer procured in record time... 14 in total to be delivered by Sweden:

Archer: First of Army's next-gen wheeled artillery system arrives in Britain​



The first example of the British Army's next generation of wheeled artillery systems, the Archer Mobile Howitzer 6x6 gun, has arrived in the UK.
A gap had been created in the Army's 155mm Close Support capability after the UK gifted 32 AS90 self-propelled guns to the armed forces of Ukraine.

The UK then struck an artillery deal with Sweden, which will see it employed as an interim solution following the donation of the AS90s to Ukraine.

According to the Army, this gap needed to be bridged "in order to meet the UK's commitment to the Nato New Force Model, resulting in the MOD procurement of an interim solution via a rapid in-year government-to-government acquisition with Sweden".

Colonel Stuart Nasse, the assistant head of Military Capability Delivery, said: "It is one of the fastest procurements of a complex system thats ever been conducted through necessity.

"We had an intolerable gap which needed to be closed, and we were fortunate our Swedish allies had an opportunity for us to purchase some of the Archer artillery system. That meant we could move quickly, to seize the opportunity and buy the new capability."


 
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