• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Bettering Fitness Standards while Waiting for BMQ

TheWatchDog

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
60
Hello there!

I'm looking to drop about 30-40 pounds before BMQ so it will be an easier time for me. Currently weighing at 6' 230lbs. If anyone has any fantastic exercises to prepare for BMQ you would be a life savior.

Cheers!
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
671
Points
1,260
TheWatchDog said:
I'm looking to drop about 30-40 pounds before BMQ so it will be an easier time for me.

How to lose weight in a healthy way (merged)
http://army.ca/forums/threads/28218.75
6 pages.

BMQ fitness for recruit 
http://army.ca/forums/threads/122349.0

Physical Fitness (Jogging, Diet, Cardiovascular, and Strength )
http://army.ca/forums/threads/23364.375
21 pages.

Running: Training, Problems, Techniques, Questions, etc 
http://army.ca/forums/threads/22788.0/nowap.html
19 pages.

I'm over-weight how much does it affect my recruitment
http://army.ca/forums/threads/110389.0

Lap-Band surgery prior to enrolment
http://army.ca/forums/threads/119874.0

Fat troops on the street.... 
http://army.ca/forums/threads/1406.300.html
13 pages.

Pushups- Try Reading Here First- Merged Thread 
http://army.ca/forums/threads/13145.425
18 pages.

Recruiting > Physical Training and Standards,
http://milnet.ca/forums/index.php/board,75.0.html

Is my prep for BMQ enough?
http://army.ca/forums/threads/93302.0

etc...

Forces.ca

Get prepared
http://www.forces.ca/en/page/training-90

Before starting basic training, you should be able to:
•run 5 kilometres.;
•run 2.4 kilometres within an appropriate time (see chart below);
•complete push-ups  with a full range of motion and sit-ups;
•complete a hand-grip test; and
•tread water for at least 2 minutes and swim 20 metres without a life jacket.

Acceptable time ranges for completing a 2.4-km run
http://www.forces.ca/en/page/training-90

Talk with your doctor before starting a fitness routine or appraisal, particularly if you have a heart condition, feel chest pain, lose your balance or consciousness, have a bone or joint problem, or take drugs for a blood pressure or heart condition.

Tell your doctor about the kinds of activities you want to do and follow his or her advice. 

If you are not feeling well because of a cold or fever, wait until you feel better before starting a fitness program. If you are or may be pregnant, talk to your doctor before becoming more active.


•Begin with a 5- to 10-minute warm-up. Light walking, biking or a slow jog will increase blood flow to the muscles and lightly increase your heart rate. Follow up with some light stretching of the muscles you will be using in your workout.
•Improving your overall fitness is most effectively done through a combination of 20-60 minutes of aerobic and strength exercises. The two sample fitness sessions below are based on Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology guidelines.
•A 5- to 10-minute cool-down helps return your body to its normal, pre-exercise condition. Suddenly stopping an intense workout can make you dizzy, nauseous or even faint.  Walking, biking or a slow jog will gradually bring down your heart rate and relieve muscle soreness.


Sample Fitness Sessions
Aerobic Fitness Session

Frequency: 3 to 5 times a week. Initially, exercising 3 times a week on non-consecutive days is best, gradually increasing your frequency to 4 to 5 times a week.

Intensity: 65%-90% of your maximum heart rate. To determine the intensity of your aerobic exercise, first calculate your maximum heart rate by subtracting your age from 220. Next, count the number of times your heart beats in 15 seconds and multiply by 4 to determine the average beats per minute. Divide the beats per minute by the maximum rate and multiply by 100. The resulting number is the percentage of intensity.

Time: 20-60 minutes. Your workout sessions should last about 20 minutes for the first few weeks.  Gradually increase your time 2 to 3 minutes each week.  The frequency and duration should not be increased in the same week; increase them one at a time.

Type: Any activity that raises your heart rate is a good activity.  However, work towards running which is a major part of basic training.

Muscular Strength Session

Frequency: 2-3 times per week. Use all major muscle groups.

Intensity: The appropriate weight is what you can lift the required number of times and not more.  The first set of exercises in a weight program is a warm-up set even though you have done a structured warm-up.

Time: 15-60 minutes.  Your workout sessions should last about 15 minutes for the first few weeks.  Gradually increase your time 2 to 3 minutes each week.  The frequency and duration should not be increased in the same week; increase them one at a time.

Type: Resistance training can include both free weights and resistance machines.

FITT

Frequency is a balance between exercising often enough to challenge your body and resting enough to allow your body to recover from the workout.
•Intensity is measured using your heart rate during aerobic activity and workload during muscular strength training.  Gradually increase the intensity of your workouts to increase your overall endurance.
•Time of your workout generally increases as you become more fit. However, if you exercise more than 60 minutes you may risk overtraining and injury.
•Type refers to the kind of exercise you choose to achieve particular fitness goals: aerobic exercise for cardio fitness and resistance training for muscular strength.


 

runormal

Sr. Member
Reaction score
0
Points
210
Hey I've found my younger clone!

Prior to joining the reserves I was sitting around 235 lbs and now I'm around 190 lbs.

I wouldn't bother with "going to the gym", as you likely haven't​ the  faintest idea what you are doing. You also could hurt yourself, if you try to do too much off the start.

What i'd recommend:
Couch potato to 5k
http://i.imgur.com/gi4Mi.gif
And

100 push-ups
http://hundredpushups.com

Most importantly, look at your diet. I found that when I moved to university, I couldn't afford all of the unhealthy foods that I ate as a child. Remove all chips, pops, cookies, chocolate and candies from your diet.

That's what I did and I have no complaints.
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
671
Points
1,260
runormal said:
What i'd recommend:
Couch potato to 5k
http://i.imgur.com/gi4Mi.gif
And

100 push-ups
http://hundredpushups.com

See also,

Couch to 5K
https://www.google.ca/search?q=site%3Aarmy.ca+couch+to&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-CA:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&gfe_rd=cr&ei=6YYAWf7cOcGC8Qfu_IDgBw&gws_rd=ssl#q=site:army.ca+%22couch+to%22&start=10&spf=375

Pushups- Try Reading Here First- Merged Thread 
https://army.ca/forums/threads/13145.375
18 pages.

runormal said:
Remove all chips, pops, cookies, chocolate and candies from your diet.

"You ain't gonna eat no bread, no corn, no pie, cake, desserts of any kind. No whole milk, no beans, no butter, no sugar, no potatoes, candy, ice cream, salad dressing or peanut butter... You came here with nothing but fat. You're gonna leave here with nothing but muscle."

The D.I.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSCp8txMl-4
1:30

Forces.ca
"Talk with your doctor before starting a fitness routine or appraisal, particularly if you have a heart condition, feel chest pain, lose your balance or consciousness, have a bone or joint problem, or take drugs for a blood pressure or heart condition.

Tell your doctor about the kinds of activities you want to do and follow his or her advice. 

If you are not feeling well because of a cold or fever, wait until you feel better before starting a fitness program. If you are or may be pregnant, talk to your doctor before becoming more active."

Edit to add:

BMI
https://www.google.ca/search?q=site%3Aarm.ca+spec&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-CA:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fnf3Vb-pA82psASy05ZQ&gws_rd=ssl#q=site:army.ca+BMI&spf=1

Weight
https://www.google.ca/search?q=site%3Aarm.ca+spec&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-CA:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&gfe_rd=cr&ei=fnf3Vb-pA82psASy05ZQ&gws_rd=ssl#q=site:army.ca+weight&spf=1

Chin ups
https://www.google.ca/search?q=site%3Aarmy.ca+chinups&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-CA:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&gfe_rd=cr&ei=bg8BWYPLBKuC8QfxoJ3QDw&gws_rd=ssl#q=site:army.ca+chin+ups&spf=186

Sit ups
https://www.google.ca/search?q=site%3Aarmy.ca+chinups&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-CA:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&gfe_rd=cr&ei=bg8BWYPLBKuC8QfxoJ3QDw&gws_rd=ssl#q=site:army.ca+sit+ups&spf=381
 

Pusser

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1
Points
430
You don't say how much time you have before you start BMQ, but to lose 30 lbs in a healthy way will generally take 20-30 weeks and you can't do with exercise alone.  You will perhaps need to change some of your eating habits  Having said that, fitness is more important than weight.  Concentrate on cardio-vascular exercises to increase your running ability as that is what will stand out the most.  Being able to bench 500 lbs won't do you a lot of good if you can't keep up on the runs.  Finally, what makes you so sure you're overweight?  BMI is a terrible gauge for large muscular people.  I'm 6'2" and weigh 275 and have no difficulty keeping up.
 

charliebravo135

Guest
Donor
Reaction score
0
Points
60
TheWatchDog said:
Hello there!

I'm looking to drop about 30-40 pounds before BMQ so it will be an easier time for me. Currently weighing at 6' 230lbs. If anyone has any fantastic exercises to prepare for BMQ you would be a life savior.

Cheers!
Start in the kitchen.  Portion size from current and keep cutting it down each week by about 1/8.  Also, start meal by drinking a full glass of water.  Cut out processed foods and go more whole foods. 

On top of that, follow the caf site on basic exercise.  Chart what you goal is and benchmark where you are at.  Depending on time until bmq, you will need to ramp up you exercise each week incrementally to match what bmq requires.  Eg.  if you can only do 5 chinups but bmq require 19, and you have 8 weeks, then start increasing your reos by 2 each additional week.  Could be tough but cutting down your weight in the kitchen is a start and is a hell lot easier than trying to run off that cheeseburger.

Keep this in mind: processed foods stays in your system about 5-7 days longer than whole foods because the fibre has been stripped.  This allows for more time for food to get absorbed and naturally turns into fat. 
Not to turn this into a science course but the kitchen is your friend in adopting a better lifestyle.

Good luck!







Sent from my SM-N910W8 using Tapatalk

 
Reaction score
0
Points
10
Hello all,

I'm currently waiting (or am on, haven't checked in a while) to be on the merit list and in the meantime I'm trying to get my cardio in shape for basic.

I keep hearing mixed things about basic, but I was wondering for those who have been through it, what sort of exercises or goals in terms of running, swimming, should I be able to do to EXCEED and not feel like absolute crap during basic.

I've currently been working my cardio up well, trying to run far but more slow. Today after about 4 days of training I did 3.5k in about 20 minutes, which I know sucks, but I wasn't really tired at the end of it and felt "good" for once. I'm trying to approach it as running distance slower, instead of working on speed like I tried to do before.

What distance should I be able to comfortable do, and what times should I be hitting? Should I be mixing interval training along with my distance running? Should I start doing laps in the pool?

Any advice is appreciated.

 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
671
Points
1,260
Before starting basic training, you should be able to:
•run 5 kilometres.;
•run 2.4 kilometres within an appropriate time (see chart below);
•complete push-ups  with a full range of motion and sit-ups;
•complete a hand-grip test; and
•tread water for at least 2 minutes and swim 20 metres without a life jacket.

Acceptable time ranges for completing a 2.4-km run
Age range
Acceptable Range
Men
Women
Under 30 years
10:13 - 11:56
12:36 - 14:26
30 – 34
10:35 - 12:26
12:57 - 14:55
35 – 39
10:58 - 12:56
13:27 - 15:25
40 – 44
11:12 - 13:25
13:57 - 15:55
45 – 49
11:27 - 13:56
14:26 - 16:25
50 – 54
11:57 - 14:25
14:56 - 16:54
55 & over
12:27 - 14:56
15:27 - 17:24

By the time you complete basic training, you will be able to:
•complete a 13-kilometre march in full combat gear;
•complete push-up and sit-up tests;
•run up to 6 kilometres;
•complete swimming tests; and
•scale walls and cross ditches as part of obstacle courses.

The following suggestions will help you get to basic training and achieve your goals. Passing the basic training fitness test is up to you and your training program.

Getting Ready to Train
Regular physical activity is fun, healthy and very safe for most people.  An excellent way to determine your fitness level is to undergo a fitness appraisal.

Talk with your doctor before starting a fitness routine or appraisal, particularly if you have a heart condition, feel chest pain, lose your balance or consciousness, have a bone or joint problem, or take drugs for a blood pressure or heart condition.

Tell your doctor about the kinds of activities you want to do and follow his or her advice. 



If you are not feeling well because of a cold or fever, wait until you feel better before starting a fitness program. If you are or may be pregnant, talk to your doctor before becoming more active.

Physical Fitness Training
Your fitness program should start at a level that’s right for you now and progress gradually as your strength and endurance improve.

Consult a fitness professional or personal trainer if you are just starting out and to get expert advice on improving your physical fitness.

When starting a workout session, take into consideration the frequency, intensity, time and type of activity and your goals – in other words, follow the FITT principle.  Here is a breakdown of FITT:
•Frequency is a balance between exercising often enough to challenge your body and resting enough to allow your body to recover from the workout.
•Intensity is measured using your heart rate during aerobic activity and workload during muscular strength training.  Gradually increase the intensity of your workouts to increase your overall endurance.
•Time of your workout generally increases as you become more fit. However, if you exercise more than 60 minutes you may risk overtraining and injury.
•Type refers to the kind of exercise you choose to achieve particular fitness goals: aerobic exercise for cardio fitness and resistance training for muscular strength.

Getting Fit With FITT
As a rule of thumb, ease into your activities, gradually increase each element of FITT, and end each session with a cool-down. For example:
•Begin with a 5- to 10-minute warm-up. Light walking, biking or a slow jog will increase blood flow to the muscles and lightly increase your heart rate. Follow up with some light stretching of the muscles you will be using in your workout.
•Improving your overall fitness is most effectively done through a combination of 20-60 minutes of aerobic and strength exercises. The two sample fitness sessions below are based on Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology guidelines.
•A 5- to 10-minute cool-down helps return your body to its normal, pre-exercise condition. Suddenly stopping an intense workout can make you dizzy, nauseous or even faint.  Walking, biking or a slow jog will gradually bring down your heart rate and relieve muscle soreness.

Sample Fitness Sessions
Aerobic Fitness Session

Frequency: 3 to 5 times a week. Initially, exercising 3 times a week on non-consecutive days is best, gradually increasing your frequency to 4 to 5 times a week.

Intensity: 65%-90% of your maximum heart rate. To determine the intensity of your aerobic exercise, first calculate your maximum heart rate by subtracting your age from 220. Next, count the number of times your heart beats in 15 seconds and multiply by 4 to determine the average beats per minute. Divide the beats per minute by the maximum rate and multiply by 100. The resulting number is the percentage of intensity.

Time: 20-60 minutes. Your workout sessions should last about 20 minutes for the first few weeks.  Gradually increase your time 2 to 3 minutes each week.  The frequency and duration should not be increased in the same week; increase them one at a time.

Type: Any activity that raises your heart rate is a good activity.  However, work towards running which is a major part of basic training.

Muscular Strength Session

Frequency: 2-3 times per week. Use all major muscle groups.

Intensity: The appropriate weight is what you can lift the required number of times and not more.  The first set of exercises in a weight program is a warm-up set even though you have done a structured warm-up.

Time: 15-60 minutes.  Your workout sessions should last about 15 minutes for the first few weeks.  Gradually increase your time 2 to 3 minutes each week.  The frequency and duration should not be increased in the same week; increase them one at a time.

Type: Resistance training can include both free weights and resistance machines.
http://www.forces.ca/en/page/training-90

FITT

Frequency is a balance between exercising often enough to challenge your body and resting enough to allow your body to recover from the workout.
•Intensity is measured using your heart rate during aerobic activity and workload during muscular strength training.  Gradually increase the intensity of your workouts to increase your overall endurance.
•Time of your workout generally increases as you become more fit. However, if you exercise more than 60 minutes you may risk overtraining and injury.
•Type refers to the kind of exercise you choose to achieve particular fitness goals: aerobic exercise for cardio fitness and resistance training for muscular strength.

See also,

BMQ fitness tips,
https://www.google.ca/search?q=site%3Aarmy.ca+fitness+bmq&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-CA:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&gfe_rd=cr&ei=xRtRWdHQA--fXt72kTg&gws_rd=ssl







 

Infant_Tree

New Member
Reaction score
0
Points
60
mariomike said:
tread water for at least 2 minutes and swim 20 metres without a life jacket.

Is there a preferred method of swimming and does it matter if it's done with proper form or not?
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
671
Points
1,260
Infant_Tree said:
Is there a preferred method of swimming and does it matter if it's done with proper form or not?

Military Swim Test - When, Where, and How- Merged 
https://army.ca/forums/threads/17795.0
13 pages.
 

Infant_Tree

New Member
Reaction score
0
Points
60
mariomike said:
Military Swim Test - When, Where, and How- Merged 
https://army.ca/forums/threads/17795.0
13 pages.

Oh yeah, I forgot I already asked this question there, sorry about that.

Another question though. Is there a lot of classroom work in BMQ/DP1, and if so, is there a lot of note-taking required? Is it worth it to practice my handwriting skills before I leave for BMQ?
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
671
Points
1,260
Infant_Tree said:
Is there a lot of classroom work in BMQ/DP1,

Basic Training Description
The course is composed of 62% classroom training with study and theoretical exams; 25% of field training with practical exams; and 13% is devoted to physical training.
http://www.forces.gc.ca/en/training-establishments/recruit-school-joining-instructions.page

Infant_Tree said:
Is it worth it to practice my handwriting skills before I leave for BMQ?

Handwriting skills will be checked in your Autobiography.

Autobiography Thread (merged)
https://army.ca/forums/threads/21042.50
10 pages

 

Loachman

Former Army Pilot in Drag
Staff member
Directing Staff
Reaction score
452
Points
980
For part of the final exam, you are given ten questions and allowed three minutes each to find answers by searching on Army.ca and write out complete quotes therefrom.
 

gryphonv

Full Member
Reaction score
12
Points
230
Loachman said:
For part of the final exam, you are given ten questions and allowed three minutes each to find answers by searching on Army.ca and write out complete quotes therefrom.

And you get bonus points for being salty or bashing whichever political party is currently in power.
 

RocketRichard

Sr. Member
Donor
Reaction score
0
Points
210
gryphonv said:
And you get bonus points for being salty or bashing whichever political party is currently in power.
Touché



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

KyleJ

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
60
Hey,

I'm leaving for BMQ and BMQ-L on Sunday in Aldershot, N.S. I am really looking forward to going, however seeing as it is coming up in a mere 4 days I am beginning to get slightly nervous (still excited).  As for my mentality I am by no means a quitter. Physically I am in what I believe to be good shape as I exercise regularly. I can run 2.4 km in about 10:05 ( 10:00 on a good day) and I can run 6km in 27:24, as well as 5 km in just under 23:00. As for pushups I can generally do around 50 consecutively and situps and pull ups are no problem at all. My question is in your opinion do you feel I am fit enough to excel at BMQ and BMQ-L? I have looked through the entire BMQ board and found similar posts but no really the same considering this is my personal fitness. If anyone could give me their honest opinion I would really appreciate it and it would certainly calm my nerves a bit. Thanks for reading this!  :warstory:
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
671
Points
1,260
KyleJ said:
My question is in your opinion do you feel I am fit enough to excel at BMQ and BMQ-L?

Before starting basic training, you should be able to:
•run 5 kilometres.;
•run 2.4 kilometres within an appropriate time (see chart below);
•complete push-ups  with a full range of motion and sit-ups;
•complete a hand-grip test; and
•tread water for at least 2 minutes and swim 20 metres without a life jacket.

Acceptable time ranges for completing a 2.4-km run
Age range
Acceptable Range
Men
Women
Under 30 years
10:13 - 11:56
12:36 - 14:26
30 – 34
10:35 - 12:26
12:57 - 14:55
35 – 39
10:58 - 12:56
13:27 - 15:25
40 – 44
11:12 - 13:25
13:57 - 15:55
45 – 49
11:27 - 13:56
14:26 - 16:25
50 – 54
11:57 - 14:25
14:56 - 16:54
55 & over
12:27 - 14:56
15:27 - 17:24

By the time you complete basic training, you will be able to:
•complete a 13-kilometre march in full combat gear;
•complete push-up and sit-up tests;
•run up to 6 kilometres;
•complete swimming tests; and
•scale walls and cross ditches as part of obstacle courses.

The following suggestions will help you get to basic training and achieve your goals. Passing the basic training fitness test is up to you and your training program.

Getting Ready to Train
Regular physical activity is fun, healthy and very safe for most people.  An excellent way to determine your fitness level is to undergo a fitness appraisal.

Talk with your doctor before starting a fitness routine or appraisal, particularly if you have a heart condition, feel chest pain, lose your balance or consciousness, have a bone or joint problem, or take drugs for a blood pressure or heart condition.

Tell your doctor about the kinds of activities you want to do and follow his or her advice. 



If you are not feeling well because of a cold or fever, wait until you feel better before starting a fitness program. If you are or may be pregnant, talk to your doctor before becoming more active.

Physical Fitness Training
Your fitness program should start at a level that’s right for you now and progress gradually as your strength and endurance improve.

Consult a fitness professional or personal trainer if you are just starting out and to get expert advice on improving your physical fitness.

When starting a workout session, take into consideration the frequency, intensity, time and type of activity and your goals – in other words, follow the FITT principle.  Here is a breakdown of FITT:
•Frequency is a balance between exercising often enough to challenge your body and resting enough to allow your body to recover from the workout.
•Intensity is measured using your heart rate during aerobic activity and workload during muscular strength training.  Gradually increase the intensity of your workouts to increase your overall endurance.
•Time of your workout generally increases as you become more fit. However, if you exercise more than 60 minutes you may risk overtraining and injury.
•Type refers to the kind of exercise you choose to achieve particular fitness goals: aerobic exercise for cardio fitness and resistance training for muscular strength.

Getting Fit With FITT
As a rule of thumb, ease into your activities, gradually increase each element of FITT, and end each session with a cool-down. For example:
•Begin with a 5- to 10-minute warm-up. Light walking, biking or a slow jog will increase blood flow to the muscles and lightly increase your heart rate. Follow up with some light stretching of the muscles you will be using in your workout.
•Improving your overall fitness is most effectively done through a combination of 20-60 minutes of aerobic and strength exercises. The two sample fitness sessions below are based on Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology guidelines.
•A 5- to 10-minute cool-down helps return your body to its normal, pre-exercise condition. Suddenly stopping an intense workout can make you dizzy, nauseous or even faint.  Walking, biking or a slow jog will gradually bring down your heart rate and relieve muscle soreness.

Sample Fitness Sessions
Aerobic Fitness Session

Frequency: 3 to 5 times a week. Initially, exercising 3 times a week on non-consecutive days is best, gradually increasing your frequency to 4 to 5 times a week.

Intensity: 65%-90% of your maximum heart rate. To determine the intensity of your aerobic exercise, first calculate your maximum heart rate by subtracting your age from 220. Next, count the number of times your heart beats in 15 seconds and multiply by 4 to determine the average beats per minute. Divide the beats per minute by the maximum rate and multiply by 100. The resulting number is the percentage of intensity.

Time: 20-60 minutes. Your workout sessions should last about 20 minutes for the first few weeks.  Gradually increase your time 2 to 3 minutes each week.  The frequency and duration should not be increased in the same week; increase them one at a time.

Type: Any activity that raises your heart rate is a good activity.  However, work towards running which is a major part of basic training.

Muscular Strength Session

Frequency: 2-3 times per week. Use all major muscle groups.

Intensity: The appropriate weight is what you can lift the required number of times and not more.  The first set of exercises in a weight program is a warm-up set even though you have done a structured warm-up.

Time: 15-60 minutes.  Your workout sessions should last about 15 minutes for the first few weeks.  Gradually increase your time 2 to 3 minutes each week.  The frequency and duration should not be increased in the same week; increase them one at a time.

Type: Resistance training can include both free weights and resistance machines.
http://www.forces.ca/en/page/training-90

FITT

Frequency is a balance between exercising often enough to challenge your body and resting enough to allow your body to recover from the workout.
•Intensity is measured using your heart rate during aerobic activity and workload during muscular strength training.  Gradually increase the intensity of your workouts to increase your overall endurance.
•Time of your workout generally increases as you become more fit. However, if you exercise more than 60 minutes you may risk overtraining and injury.
•Type refers to the kind of exercise you choose to achieve particular fitness goals: aerobic exercise for cardio fitness and resistance training for muscular strength.

See also,

BMQ fitness tips,
https://www.google.ca/search?q=site%3Aarmy.ca+fitness+bmq&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-CA:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&gfe_rd=cr&ei=xRtRWdHQA--fXt72kTg&gws_rd=ssl




 

Swally

New Member
Reaction score
0
Points
10
TheWatchDog said:
Hello there!

I'm looking to drop about 30-40 pounds before BMQ so it will be an easier time for me. Currently weighing at 6' 230lbs. If anyone has any fantastic exercises to prepare for BMQ you would be a life savior.

Cheers!

I'm in similar shoes, 6 foot but mid250s, trying to get into the Reserves.

I've been powerlifting the past few years, which isn't the best for joining the military, fitness-wise anyways.

I've started walking and doing a bodyweight circuit almost daily, gym down to about 2 days a week only and as the weeks go by I add some running and longer walks with a backpack.
3 weeks in I'm down 7 lbs.

Canada has some decent workout routines, as do the Brits.

https://www.cfmws.com/en/AboutUs/PSP/DFIT/Fitness/Documents/Army%20fitness%20manual.pdf
http://www.royalnavy.mod.uk/-/media/files/cnr-pdfs/get-fit-to-apply-rm.pdf?la=en-gb

The 5 exercise circuit the Brits do is quite pleasant, quick to do and gets the heart and muscles working pretty good!

I'm also following a fitness app the Swedish military has released (I'm swedish, used to be in the Army in Sweden some 17 years ago, I'm 37 now), they have a few programs incl a 12 week one to get ready for basic training.

I have picked a little from all the programs I feel are relevant to:
a) make something I have time to do
b) do something I enjoy doing
c) yields good results

How's training so far OP?


 
Top