• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Why everybody is suddenly allergic to everything

FormerHorseGuard

Sr. Member
Reaction score
76
Points
280
I have more allergies than I can count, food, drugs and environmental ones.
I do not force people around me to stop enjoying their food or their drugs. I just do not handle any
drugs I am allergic to unless my kids need them, rubber gloves and handwashing after handling.

I think if you do not have something to be allergic to , you are not trendy or fashionable,  so you create
an allergy. Some people think having an allergy will get them special service at restaurants and other
places, fresher foods a different menu etc.

I have broken  my allergy diet many times,  I can live with the side effects, runny nose, itchy eyes, stuffed nose, but the drug ones could be deadly.

so many people out there are faking allergies just to have something to complain about or to brag about.
just my thoughts
Opie out
 

Jarnhamar

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
2,991
Points
1,060
[quote author=FormerHorseGuard]

so many people out there are faking allergies just to have something to complain about or to brag about.

[/quote]

Just like kids and young adults with mental Ilness.
 

FormerHorseGuard

Sr. Member
Reaction score
76
Points
280
https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/food-allergies-resaurants-1.4127854

not just me thinking there are people faking allergies
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
9,181
Points
1,160
FormerHorseGuard said:
https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/food-allergies-resaurants-1.4127854

not just me thinking there are people faking allergies

Seems there's a book about this subject:

The Snowflake Effect: How the Self-Esteem Movement Ruined a Generation

Just about everyone under the age of thirty is an entitled, unhappy, lazy, shallow, egomaniacal monster. At least that’s what they say. They, of course, are pretty much anyone over the age of thirty. They are also pretty accurate in their description of us. This has become something of a problem for our society. The Self-Esteem Movement was the catalyst for the shift in cultural norms and values that has allegedly ruined an entire generation. Everyone was suddenly a special and unique little snowflake. Trophies were mandatory. Success became an expectation. We have been corrupted by self-esteem. This warrants discussion, but no ordinary discussion will do. Bear witness as one of these snowflakes attempts to examine the detrimental and lingering impact of the Self-Esteem Movement through topics including television, education, Sigmund Freud, stand-up comedy, region, mental illness, baseball, pornography, and a number of other things that are at least somewhat relevant.

You are not special. Neither am I.

https://www.amazon.com/Snowflake-Effect-Self-Esteem-Movement-Generation/dp/1499795424
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
586
Points
1,260
daftandbarmy said:
How the Self-Esteem Movement Ruined a Generation

It may have something to do with generations. Many men returning from WW2 joined the emergency services. I served my probation and early years under the watchful eyes of the '46ers. My father was one of them. 

They were hard men who lived hard. They all smoked, drank too much, and were mentally tough.

Even as the outside world progressed, and they retired, their attitudes were adopted and continued to be dominant within the organization for years to come.

They were my role models. I was pretty "moldable" at that age. I admired them.

The young people coming out of the colleges are better educated than we were. No better or worse. Just a different point of view, I suppose.
 

garb811

Army.ca Veteran
Staff member
Directing Staff
Reaction score
8
Points
530
Sometimes, allergies appear out of the blue...

Case in point, one of my kids had a severe anaphylactic reaction at school earlier this year. He texted me right after lunch saying he wasn't feeling well and was in the bathroom as it had started with sudden onset diarrhea.  As I texted back and forth with him I got more and more concerned and got him to head down to the office just in case things were going as side wise as I thought they were. By the time he got there, his lips were blue, everything above his hips was covered in hives and his throat was starting to constrict. I got a call from the counselor, who happens to be a part-time paramedic, asking if she could administer an epi-pen that was on hand due to another student while they waited on an ambulance.

The blood test at the ER showed he was reacting to milk, eggs and...timothy grass?  He had always eaten milk and eggs and has certainly spent enough of his life outdoors that he has been constantly exposed to grass pollen. He ate the exact same lunch he had eaten dozens of times before, a tuna salad sandwich, carton of chocolate milk and a chocolate chip cookie.  The only major thing that was different was he had his wisdom teeth pulled 5 days prior and what he had for lunch was his first exposure to milk and eggs after that.
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
9,181
Points
1,160
garb811 said:
Sometimes, allergies appear out of the blue...

Case in point, one of my kids had a severe anaphylactic reaction at school earlier this year. He texted me right after lunch saying he wasn't feeling well and was in the bathroom as it had started with sudden onset diarrhea.  As I texted back and forth with him I got more and more concerned and got him to head down to the office just in case things were going as side wise as I thought they were. By the time he got there, his lips were blue, everything above his hips was covered in hives and his throat was starting to constrict. I got a call from the counselor, who happens to be a part-time paramedic, asking if she could administer an epi-pen that was on hand due to another student while they waited on an ambulance.

The blood test at the ER showed he was reacting to milk, eggs and...timothy grass?  He had always eaten milk and eggs and has certainly spent enough of his life outdoors that he has been constantly exposed to grass pollen. He ate the exact same lunch he had eaten dozens of times before, a tuna salad sandwich, carton of chocolate milk and a chocolate chip cookie.  The only major thing that was different was he had his wisdom teeth pulled 5 days prior and what he had for lunch was his first exposure to milk and eggs after that.

Ok, so now you have just scared the cr@p out of me ...
 

Navy_Pete

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
1,221
Points
1,040
garb, glad he's okay.  My dad had something similar happen with crab when he was around 60. Pretty random but can happen.
 

CountDC

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
20
Points
480
FormerHorseGuard said:
so many people out there are faking allergies just to have something to complain about or to brag about.

With this.  Remember years ago attending a parent session at school.  One woman got up and went on about how her daughter was so allergic to peanuts that even being in the same room with one could be deadly, held up an EpiPen and explained how they were used.  Few hours later same woman at store in produce area standing next to the peanuts talking while her daughter cracked open and ate peanuts.
 

BeyondTheNow

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Mentor
Reaction score
6
Points
530
mariomike said:
It may have something to do with generations. Many men returning from WW2 joined the emergency services. I served my probation and early years under the watchful eyes of the '46ers. My father was one of them. 

They were hard men who lived hard. They all smoked, drank too much, and were mentally tough.

Even as the outside world progressed, and they retired, their attitudes were adopted and continued to be dominant within the organization for years to come.

They were my role models. I was pretty "moldable" at that age. I admired them.

The young people coming out of the colleges are better educated than we were. No better or worse. Just a different point of view, I suppose.

'Couldn't help but think of this... :whistle:
(taken from FB Public Service group)

 

Attachments

  • IMG_2806.jpg
    IMG_2806.jpg
    213.9 KB · Views: 125

BDTyre

Sr. Member
Reaction score
0
Points
210
About five years ago I randomly developed a...sensitivity...to eggs. But not fully cooked eggs; only undercooked or raw eggs, likely the whites. My lips, cheeks, tongue and throat would swell slightly. Even if my hand came in contact with raw egg white, it would get itchy. I avoided eggs for a few months and it suddenly went away. I've had no problems since.
 

BeyondTheNow

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Mentor
Reaction score
6
Points
530
People faking and/or exaggerating allergies for sympathy, to feel special/part of a club or something, etc. is an entirely separate conversation and I haven't patience for that kind of ridiculousness...good on you, CountDC, for not calling that person out. I would've found it very difficult to remain silent--I'm sure I would have, but I certainly would've been seething.

Garb811: Wow, scary stuff. 'Glad suitable assistance was available at the onset.

I've heard of people essentially growing into allergies--especially environmental. I live in an area where the air-quality is consistently poor at times due to pollution, pollen levels etc. It's not uncommon for people here to begin exhibiting typical seasonal allergies, sore/itchy throats, watery eyes, sneezing, coughing etc. as adults, when they had nothing while growing up. Luckily it's very rare for people to suddenly have a serious reaction to something if they've never had any type of allergic reaction to anything at any point during their lives.

That being said, thankfully, it's possible for people to go the other way too--to out-grow an allergy. My cousin suffered from peanut allergies when he was a child and has now officially developed tolerance. (It was serious enough to require an epi-pen, used on at least 2 occasions that I'm aware of, between the ages of 15 and 19.) As an adult, he went to get tested since he hadn't had any sort of negative reaction in a number of years. The final component required him to eat a spoonful of natural peanut butter in the doctor's office. They were prepared if anything adverse occurred, but nothing did. He was officially cleared of suffering from a peanut allergy, but still has to go back every 5yrs or something to make sure the status remains. He's 46 now.

The main issue is why North American society is riddled with some of the highest percentages of allergies, especially serious ones, among developed nations. 

...Research from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that food allergies in children have increased approximately 50 percent between 1997 and 2011, now affecting 1 in 13 children in the United States. This translates to roughly two students in every classroom...

https://www.cnbc.com/2016/09/09/allergies-are-on-the-rise-and-here-are-three-reasons-why.html

Other informative links:

https://foodallergycanada.ca/

https://www.foodallergy.org/life-with-food-allergies/food-allergy-101/facts-and-statistics

https://www.climate.gov/news-features/climate-and/climate-allergies

https://www.aaaai.org/about-aaaai/newsroom/allergy-statistics

https://bigthink.com/robby-berman/why-do-food-allergies-including-peanuts-so-plague-the-us
 

mariomike

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
586
Points
1,260
BeyondTheNow said:
'Couldn't help but think of this... :whistle:
(taken from FB Public Service group)

With respect to facebook, memes don't always tell the whole story.  :)
 

BeyondTheNow

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Mentor
Reaction score
6
Points
530
mariomike said:
With respect to facebook, memes don't always tell the whole story.  :)

Cop's tweet...Oh yes, I know. But I'd be lying if I said I didn't chuckle. ;)
 

Cloud Cover

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
30
Points
530
It must be getting harder to find suitable recruits who aren't allergic to anything. 
 

Bruce Monkhouse

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Reaction score
1,922
Points
1,260
CloudCover said:
It must be getting harder to find suitable recruits who aren't allergic to anything. 
You mean like discipline? :whistle:
 
Top