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Who makes the C6??

KevinB

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Hmm - shows for me.. ???

Its two pics of the prototype Minigun/Hummer platform from USNSWC Crane.

Anyone else see or not see?



 

Infanteer

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I can't see your pictures Kevin.  Maybe try attaching them instead of hotlinking.

Anyone ever played around with the MG3?  How is it in compared to our GPMG?

I remember playing around with some captured MG-42s overseas.  I kind of like the barrel change system better (quick and easy) but found the gun a little more awkward to handle compared to the C6.  The guts of the thing look pretty close to the C6.  Looking at the characteristics for the MG-42 are some amazing figures with a cyclic rate of 1200-1400 rounds per minute.  That may almost be too much ammo consumption for light infantry.

Here is a picture of a bunch that we seized overseas, along with some other junk the locals had hiding in their barns....
 

Infanteer

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Neato.  Works good now.  Where is Arnold Schwarzenegger in the pictures?
 

KevinB

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;D
Actually a SF Col posted this - seems to be in responce to the OIF AAR's - they need that high ROF

I hear it does great at Afghani weddings too  :eek:
 

AlphaCharlie

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Infanteer said:
I remember playing around with some captured MG-42s overseas.  I kind of like the barrel change system better (quick and easy) but found the gun a little more awkward to handle compared to the C6.  The guts of the thing look pretty close to the C6.  Looking at the characteristics for the MG-42 are some amazing figures with a cyclic rate of 1200-1400 rounds per minute.  That may almost be too much ammo consumption for light infantry.

Infanteer, were you playing with MG3s or with MG42s (like, acctual ww2 era MGs?) if it's the latter that's awesome, it was one of the finest MGs ever made IMO...
 

Infanteer

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Actually, I think they were all of the local Zastava manufacture, which was an MG-42 design retooled for 7.62x39mm.   A few of them may have been actual MG-42's that some partisan pryed from the dead hands of some German sixty odd years ago.   I think we had an MP-40 with German stamping on it, but I can't find a picture of it.

Here is some more stuff we siezed off the locals.   I think most of this was from a Cordon and Search on a town we did with the Americans.

 

AlphaCharlie

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Thats a lot of guns.

The middle collumn, the gun right below the pistols looks like a russian PPsH.... wierd.
 

KevinB

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I got to burn through a belt from a MG42 during a foreign weapons demo in Pet circa '89  - way previous to any really professional understanding of weapons (I was then a militia Cpl  ;D).
 I got to see (but not fire  :-[) a German MG3 a few years back - It does not seem to have any real changes (that I could) other than being in 7.62x51 and using metal links...



Before we go all gushy on the C6 - the new gas regulator has to be the stupidest idea ever -   Yes getting rid of the split collars was nice - but now we have to change barrels in the event of gas stoppages - every try to chnage the gas settnig on the new ones in the field - when its HOT  :mad:
 We (the 031's) have discussed this matter with DLR and the LCMM and are attempting a solution.
 

Infanteer

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Before we go all gushy on the C6 - the new gas regulator has to be the stupidest idea ever -  Yes getting rid of the split collars was nice - but now we have to change barrels in the event of gas stoppages - every try to chnage the gas settnig on the new ones in the field - when its HOT 
We (the 031's) have discussed this matter with DLR and the LCMM and are attempting a solution.

I still can't figure out that decision.  The new regulators, although less prone to gas stoppages, are nigh on impossible to adjust in the heat of the fight.  Whoever thought of that one should be sent to Afghanistan as a C6 gunner.  I got lucky on my MG course in that our unit still had the old style ones, making life on the ranges much easier.
 

AlphaCharlie

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Agreed, and although i've never seen the old system, needing 1 minute on a hot barrel in combat trying to switch the regulator is dumb. A switch like the C9 seems much more effective.


And you keep saying you fired an MG42... do you mean like replicas? or vintage weapons? It's to my best knowledge that the MG42 stopped production in '45 with the defeat of Germany...
 

KevinB

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There are some old 42's in this country...


and Balkans being Balkans there is NO DOUBT many many more real deal 42s floating about
 

KevinB

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Most are. 

I saw a civilian FA shoot at Connaught with two MG42's (owned by Grandfathered individuals) - they took out a sandbag bunker built up on the mantlet in about 15 sec... :eek:
 

loyalcana

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Yugoslavia manufactured MG-42 chambered with the original Mauser round for some time after World War II so not everyone of the guns is a true WWII relic.
 

Michael Dorosh

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Next to the PPSh, it looks like a Bergmann MP28.  Lots of old stuff floating around the Balkans still, so they tell me.  Not that unusual, if it works, go with it.  If a foreign army ever occupied Canada, you would find lots of Lee Enfields turning up in cordon and search operations.  Some Stens and Brens out there in private hands, too.
 

stukirkpatrick

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Speaking of weapons in Canada, the .50 cal at my local mil museum (in armoury) was donated by the OPP, because it was seized from some criminals (probably hell's angels) who only needed a small part to make it operational...Good thing the cops got there first.  But it makes you stop and think...  :eek:
 

KevinB

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Kirkpatrick said:
, because it was seized from some criminals  who only needed a small part to make it operational

Okay so they seized a gun that did not work  ::)
Deactivated guns are legal (not saying this was in fact a dewat)

I fail to see what sort of use any criminal would have for a HMG - kinda hard to use discretely....
 

Infanteer

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I fail to see what sort of use any criminal would have for a HMG - kinda hard to use discretely....

"Argh, they've surrounded the Clubhouse, break out the .50!!!"

;D
 

Sheerin

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I'm pretty sure knowledge of a .50HMG would make any ETF team rethink an assualt on a clubhouse.  I'm assuming that .50HMG fire would go right through standard body armour used by the police and their ETF teams, right?

 
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