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Whither "Artillery-based avalanche control"?

The Bread Guy

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Interesting piece in the New York Times on using the big guns to take care of potential avalanches, and how this may not be a viable option into the future. 

Loved seeing the 106 (not "105" as mentioned in the article) being put to an interesting - and at 500 rounds per a year, frequent - use.
 

geo

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The M40 recoilless rifle was a lightweight, portable, crew-served 105 mm weapon intended primarily as an anti-tank weapon made in the United States. The weapon is commonly described as being 106 mm, but it is in fact 105 mm; the 106 mm designation was designed to prevent confusion with the incompatible 105 mm ammunition from the failed M27

The US Army used 105 mm M27 recoilless rifle in the 1950s. This rifle, a 105mm weapon, proved to be lacking in accuracy as well as reliability and was soon put out of service. Soon, the M27 was redesigned as the M40 and, to avoid confusion and to also prevent use of the M27 ammunition still in stocks in the new weapon, the M40 was classified as a "106mm" weapon
 

GnyHwy

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Yes. I have done avanlanche control which is done in Rogers Pass B.C..  Basic angles and elevations are applied to a C1 105mm howitzer and standard HE round is fired at the potential avalanche area.  Studies are done by civilians in order to determine if an avalanche is imminent.  Once that is determined, the highway is closed, we deploy and initiate the avalanche in a safe an controlled manner.  There are approx 20 locations in the vicinity of Rogers Pass that this is done. Oh yeah, it's kinda fun too.
 
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