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What's your gas price? 2.0

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mudrecceman

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95.6 for diesel (self serve) at the Robie-Young Street Esso. ( I drive a Jetta GLS TDI...gotta love a diesel!)
 

R933ex

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I just finished paying $1.26 a litre for diesel in Nahanni Butte NWT. Down the street it is $1.08 a litre.

 

IN HOC SIGNO

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RUMINT

Gas is rumoured to be going up between 5 and 10 cents a litre tomorrow morning here in Halifax. Tomorrow is the two week gateway where the oil companies are allowed to raise of lower the price in accordance with the Government Regulation of Gas prices.
I filled up last night but I guess they'll shaft us in the end anyway.... :rage:
 

c.jacob

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They said on the news yesterday that Imperial Oil is back to 75% normal production and all of the gas stations in town are open and have gas again.  Yet today the price went from 102.9 to 105.9.  I may not know completely how the gas prices work (aside from gouging).  But isn't more supply grounds for the price going down?
 

proudnurse

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It was 102.00 in Cambridge ON when I filled up yesterday, then again the stations that were out last time I got gas are back up and running, may be a bit expensive right now but I'm just glad they have gas again.

Rebecca
 

IN HOC SIGNO

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(on rant) Halifax woke up to 112.9 this morning. It has since scaled back to 110.9 at most stations. Reasons given?? "Increased demand in the US market." What the heck does that have to do with the price of tea in China??? ???
This and a barrel of oil actually went down by a dollar yesterday.
The thing is that if we were still on the Imperial system would we actually sit still for a .45 a gallon increase?? That's what we just had folks!!
I guess we are just all hooked so bad that they know we'll pay whatever they decide to charge us. Do we really have a choice?? I know I don't. My whole life revolves around getting places by POMV. :rage:(off rant)
 

CrazyCanuk4536056919

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99.9 at Tyendinaga Mohawk Territory, as of 1500hrs Friday March 9th, just east of Belleville on Hwy #2.

Was a 104.9 in Belleville.

Check out Ontariogasprices.com for a station near you, in Ontario that is.
 

sober_ruski

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This morning same station as yesterday had 108.8.
Lets see if it goes to 109.9 tomorrow morning. :mad:

Someone please explain to me this:

Stations refill once every couple weeks. So how come if price of oil goes up TODAY, price of gas at the station goes up TODAY? What they have in the tanks is at least a couple months old oil price wise. BUT when price of oil goes down  TODAY, price of gas at the station goes down NEXT WEEK.

Stations dont even make that much profit of gas anyways, it is mostly stuff sold at their little stores, lottery and cigs.
 

c.jacob

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The gas station that we fill up our work vehicles at is an independant.  So he pays whatever the gas companies charge him when they fill up.  His wife will call him on her way into work and tell him what the other stations in town are selling for and he sets his price accordingly.
 

hoist-monkey

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106.9 in Greater Victoria.  :'(
Once again I went to work in the morning and gas was at a lower rate but I didn't feel like stopping to fill up, so I waited until
after work and bam!!! 4 cents more a liter in one day.

In my Mazda 5 to fill it up that works out to an extra $1.60, it doesn't seem like much but it does add up.

I am so glad that I don't drive a truck/SUV gas guzzler.
 

IN HOC SIGNO

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In the Halifax paper this am

Price regulation: what’s it good for?

By ROGER TAYLOR Business Columnist
ADVERTISEMENT



THE AVERAGE price for gasoline in Canada has now climbed above $1 per litre, and it appears that most of the country achieved that lofty price without provincial regulation.

If the price is going up everywhere, it makes one wonder whether the Nova Scotia regulation regime is really serving any purpose — aside from keeping some government bureaucrats busy monitoring gasoline prices.

I know officially the gasoline price regulations were never designed to keep pump prices lower in Nova Scotia. Rather, the idea behind the government’s plan was to keep the price increases and reductions regular by mandating that the price be set once every fortnight. It was also a goal of the regulations to assist mostly rural, low-volume gas retailers, who had been having difficulty competing with higher-volume competitors, from going out of business.

But the government doesn’t control the price wholesalers pay for the gasoline they deliver to the retailers; thus it is sometimes difficult for the wholesalers, like Wilson Fuel Co., a Nova Scotia business, to deliver supply to remote gas dealers at the price established by the government.

One more thing. It was never the goal of the Nova Scotia government to make the price increases predictable; the government refuses to telegraph the price in advance to consumers before the new price appears on the pump so that people can fill their tank before the price goes up.

That hasn’t stopped Nova Scotia’s drivers from making an educated guess about what the price might be, and some are getting good at it. Even before the price rose by about 10 cents on Friday, it was not such a big secret. As usual, there were lineups at most gas stations in the province on Thursday, and some even ran out of fuel because demand was so great.

I know from personal experience the Irving Oil outlet on Robie Street in Halifax was offering its supreme grade for the same price as regular on Thursday evening because it ran out of regular gas earlier in the day.

The Nova Scotia regulator set the price at $1.108 to $1.125 per litre on Friday, which is the lowest price range in the province. Typically, retailers increase the price to the maximum end of the price range for the first few days after the price changes and then ease back as the two-week price period begins to wane.

Dave Collins, Wilson Fuel vice-president, says that even before the government started regulating the price of gasoline last year, the magical mark of $1 per litre has always been a sticking point with the consumer. While people tend to grumble about the price as it edges toward the $1 threshold, he says, after it goes past that point consumers tend to change their driving habits so they burn less gas.

While that might be good news in terms of air pollution, the high fuel price has an impact on the provincial economy. Collins argues the regulatory system prolongs the pain of higher prices, while the unregulated system allows the price to rise and fall with the changes in the market.

One reader called me on Friday to express concern that the price of gasoline in Nova Scotia is still higher than in New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. I’m told the main reason for the price difference is the fact that Nova Scotia charges higher taxes on gasoline.

The new Liberal government in New Brunswick cut the tax its collects from petroleum products after it won a provincial election last fall, but the resulting cut has had an impact on provincial finances.

And Collins isn’t sure the price the P.E.I. regulator sets, which was $1.098 on Friday, is enough to cover the cost of supplying many of the low-volume dealers on the Island.

He says he’s written to the P.E.I. regulator to complain his company wasn’t able to cover its costs for delivery in the Island in February and unless the pricing is more sensitive to the price Wilson Fuel pays for supply, Collins says he’s worried expenses will be greater than income in March.

If that happens, Collins says, he may be forced to stop delivery of gasoline to some dealers in P.E.I.

He says gasoline wholesalers like Wilson have a measure of protection in P.E.I., unlike Nova Scotia, because the legislation indicates the price established by the regulator should be fair to both wholesalers and retailers. If the price is not found to be fair to the wholesaler, Collins says, as a last resort he will be able seek some relief in the courts.

There are public opinion polls, he says, that show more people oppose price regulation as the cost of filling up increases, but that opposition drops off as the price falls below $1 per litre.

While I oppose the idea of government setting gasoline prices, I have to admit the majority of e-mails I receive on this topic tend to suggest people are starting to get used to the regulated system. It should be pointed out, however, that people were used to the unregulated pricing system in Nova Scotia before the government decided to intervene in the marketplace.

Ultimately consumers are adaptive creatures who can acclimatize to changing market conditions and that should not be taken as an indication that regulation is better than the free market in determining prices.

( rtaylor@herald.ca)

 

sober_ruski

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One more time. Gas stations make money from selling stuff inside their little stores, not actual gas. That's why if there's no more regular they start selling premium at lower prices.
 

TCBF

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$0.93 at the Lancaster Park CANEX this morning, and that's about the norm for Edmonton.

Some nice flaring-off over the refinery last night. 
 

eurowing

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Campbell River BC.....  in the space of 2 km 95.9 and 105.9  Comox Valley 102.5 
 
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