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Wearing an Ancestor's Medals Mega-thread

chrisf

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Its not a negative comment on reservists, it's just a statement of fact.

The average reservist is around for maybe four years. In that time, most will never see a memorial cross, and will not likely be able to identify one. I'd go so far as to say most would be hard pressed to identify most honours/awards outside the current "common" ones. Nothing to do with ignorance, just reality that most reservists had probably not seen most medals.
 

dapaterson

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a Sig Op said:
Its not a negative comment on reservists, it's just a statement of fact.

The average reservist is around for maybe four years. In that time, most will never see a memorial cross, and will not likely be able to identify one. I'd go so far as to say most would be hard pressed to identify most honours/awards outside the current "common" ones. Nothing to do with ignorance, just reality that most reservists had probably not seen most medals.

Hardly a problem unique to members of the Reserve force.  It's not uncommon to see improperly arranged ribbons on Reg F members wearing their 3s, and sometimes the more unusual ribbons & medals get a quick "What's that" as well.
 

chrisf

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Folks are always afraid to admit and ask questions when they don't somthing. Ill happily admit I've said "hi, do you mind if I ask, what's that?" In reference to someone's honours and awards many times. Often comes with an interesting story. I think I've probably asked folks of every rank, retired folk, and folks from foreign countries.
 

x_para76

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In my time as a reservist I don't ever recall being given a form to fill out to nominate someone to receive this award in the event of my death including when I was deployed overseas. For how long has this award been in existance? Is the award retroactive?
 

mariomike

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x_para76 said:
For how long has this award been in existance? Is the award retroactive?

Some information you may find of interest.

Memorial Cross
http://forums.army.ca/forums/threads/71771.0;nowap

Memorial Ribbon
http://forums.army.ca/forums/threads/103245.0
 

ModlrMike

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x_para76 said:
In my time as a reservist I don't ever recall being given a form to fill out to nominate someone to receive this award in the event of my death including when I was deployed overseas. For how long has this award been in existance? Is the award retroactive?

The Memorial Cross (more often referred to as the Silver Cross) was first instituted by Order-in-Council 2374, dated December 1, 1919. It was awarded to mothers and widows (next of kin) of Canadian soldiers who died on active duty or whose death was consequently attributed to such duty.

More information is available here: Memorial Crosses
 

PPCLI Guy

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George Wallace said:
This is a form that the OR has members fill in annually..... If the Clerks aren't doing it, then there is something wrong.  It doesn't matter if they are PRes or Reg, it is an administrative problem.  At the same time, those who don't ask questions as to what they are filling out/signing, really are looking for problems later in other contracts, etc. that they may sign outside of the military.

It still boils down to people not doing their jobs.

Sorry to butt in - it is not a clerk's fault.  The fault lies with commanders: section, platoon, company and unit.  They (and their trusty right hands at all levels) bear full responsibility for the administration of their soldiers, not the clerks.  Clerks just prepare the necessary paperwork - the responsibility lies, as always, with commanders.  I see way too many Officers and Senior NCOs who honestly think that administration os the sole purview of clerks.  Responsibilities. unlike authorities, cannot be delegated.
 

Michael OLeary

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ModlrMike said:
The Memorial Cross (more often referred to as the Silver Cross) was first instituted by Order-in-Council 2374, dated December 1, 1919. It was awarded to mothers and widows (next of kin) of Canadian soldiers who died on active duty or whose death was consequently attributed to such duty.

More information is available here: Memorial Crosses

But it was only in 2006 that the change was made to any three recipients as selected by the service member.

Fathers and husbands to get Memorial Crosses

Other discussion threads on the memorial Cross


 

George Wallace

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PPCLI Guy said:
Sorry to butt in - it is not a clerk's fault.  The fault lies with commanders: section, platoon, company and unit.  They (and their trusty right hands at all levels) bear full responsibility for the administration of their soldiers, not the clerks.  Clerks just prepare the necessary paperwork - the responsibility lies, as always, with commanders.  I see way too many Officers and Senior NCOs who honestly think that administration os the sole purview of clerks.  Responsibilities. unlike authorities, cannot be delegated.

Indeed, administration lies on the shoulders of all supervisors; but when it comes to organizing an annual event to ensure everyone's Pers files are in order and up to date, the clerks are most familiar with what documentation should be in those files.  A Troop/Platoon WO/Officer's file/book will not hold all the necessary info, nor should it.
 

George Wallace

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x_para76 said:
In my time as a reservist I don't ever recall being given a form to fill out to nominate someone to receive this award in the event of my death including when I was deployed overseas. For how long has this award been in existance? Is the award retroactive?

Reply #10 has the Msg dated DEC 06, that institutes the changes:  Memorial Cross

3.  BEGINNING 1 JAN 07, THE MEMORIAL CROSS WILL BE GRANTED UNDER THE NEW OIC AS A MEMENTO OF PERSONAL LOSS AND SACRIFICE IN RESPECT OF THE DEATH OF A MBR OR FORMER MBR RESULTING FROM AN INJURY OR DIESEASE RELATED TO MIL SVC, REGARDLESS OF LOCATION

All the other details are found in that msg at the above link.
 

x_para76

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Not that I have any intention of wearing them but we just got word that the MOD is going to issue us all of my Grandfather's WW 2 medals. Since he had never received any of them the process took a little while to complete and by the time we receive them it'll have been just over a year from flash to bang.
 

bick

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That's great news X Para. Better to be with you and your family where they can be appreciated. Who did he serve with during the war?
 

Loachman

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My father's older brother was KIA in Burma on 20 May 1944 while fighting with the Chindits (either West Kent Regiment or Buffs, British Army; sketchy accounts have more conflict than detail). My grandmother threw out his medals when they were delivered, and destroyed all other records of his military service. All that I have is a photograph, and his service number.

How does one go about researching records of deceased family members? I would like to purchase copies of the medals that he was awarded.
 

bick

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Search at:

Www.cwgc.org to start. This will give you his army number, rank, regiment etc.
 

George Wallace

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Rhodesian said:
Search at:

Www.cwgc.org to start. This will give you his army number, rank, regiment etc.

Please pay attention to detail:

Loachman said:
My father's older brother was KIA in Burma on 20 May 1944 while fighting with the Chindits (either West Kent Regiment or Buffs, British Army; sketchy accounts have more conflict than detail). My grandmother threw out his medals when they were delivered, and destroyed all other records of his military service. All that I have is a photograph, and his service number.

How does one go about researching records of deceased family members? I would like to purchase copies of the medals that he was awarded.

You will probably have to send off a request to the UK Government for this information; as the Canadian archives will not contain anything pertaining to him unless he served in the Canadian military.

A few links that may help (I have not checked them out fully.):

http://www.findmypast.com/articles/world-records/full-list-of-united-kingdom-records/armed-forces-and-conflict?gclid=CMf35eDt2L0CFeY-Mgodd3EAHQ

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/looking-for-person/britisharmysoldierafter1913.htm

http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/records/looking-for-person/

https://www.findmypast.co.uk/content/search-menu/military-armed-forces-and-conflict

http://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/

http://search.ancestry.co.uk/search/category.aspx?cat=39
 

Old Sweat

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The reference is to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission and therefore would have the record in question. (I just checked the site, but not any other detail.)
 

x_para76

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Rhodesian said:
That's great news X Para. Better to be with you and your family where they can be appreciated. Who did he serve with during the war?

My grandfather was seconded from the S. African Union defence forces to the Royal Navy. He served from December 1941 to 1946 with the special branch as either a radar or sonar officer.
 

x_para76

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Loachman said:
My father's older brother was KIA in Burma on 20 May 1944 while fighting with the Chindits (either West Kent Regiment or Buffs, British Army; sketchy accounts have more conflict than detail). My grandmother threw out his medals when they were delivered, and destroyed all other records of his military service. All that I have is a photograph, and his service number.

How does one go about researching records of deceased family members? I would like to purchase copies of the medals that he was awarded.

If you're the primary next of kin you can send in the paper work requesting his medals to the MoD medals office. They may not reissue the medals but they can certainly tell you what he is entitled to. 
 

bick

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So, the Internet bullies strike again!  Yeaterday, I gave a proper link to The Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Promptly, George Wallace jumped on it and told me to read the post etc. Obviously, he wasn't familiar with the CWGC. As I was correct and attacked on an open forum, I deducted 100 milpoints from him. This morning, I get an email from this site telling me that George Wallace has deducted 300 milpoints from me for being, "misleading" about subject post.

Nothing like "man'ing up" and admitting you are wrong George Wallace!  Petty. Must have gotten many low marks for accountability.

Enjoy your weekend all.
 
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