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U.S. bomb kills 3 British soldiers in Afghanistan

Good2Golf

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U.S. bomb kills 3 British soldiers in Afghanistan
CBC News (AP)
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Three British soldiers were killed by a bomb dropped by a U.S. warplane in southern Afghanistan, Britain's Ministry of Defence said Friday.

The soldiers, all members of 1st Battalion, the Royal Anglian Regiment, were killed around 6:30 p.m. local time Thursday after being attacked by insurgents while on patrol in Helmand province, the ministry said in a release.

"During the intense engagement that ensued, close air support was called in from two US F-15 aircraft to repel the enemy," the statement said.

"One bomb was dropped and it is believed the explosion killed the three soldiers."

The three soldiers were declared dead at the scene, the ministry said. Two other soldiers who were injured were evacuated by helicopter to a medical facility for treatment.

The ministry said the incident will be investigated.
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Earlier this year, British Defence Secretary Des Browne said that since 1990, 12 British personnel had died in so-called "friendly fire" incidents involving U.S. forces in Iraq, but that no such incidents had taken place in Afghanistan.

NATO's mission in Afghanistan has featured several friendly fire incidents since it began in 2001.

After an inquest into the death of a British soldier killed in friendly fire by two American pilots in Iraq in 2003, opposition legislators in Britain called for improvements in joint identification systems.

A U.S. army report made public in July found that friendly fire killed a Canadian soldier and an American soldier in Afghanistan in March 2006.

In another incident on Sept. 4, 2006, a Canadian soldier was killed and 36 others were wounded when a U.S. pilot mistakenly strafed their position with machine-gun fire.

On April 18, 2002, an American F-16 fighter jet dropped a laser-guided 225-kilogram bomb near Kandahar, accidentally killing four Canadian soldiers and injuring eight others.

With files from the Associated Press
 

geo

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Sigh!
My condolences to the Family, Friends & Comrades of the fallen

At ease soldiers, rest - your mission is done, we'll take it from here,
At the going down of the sun
and in the morn,
we will remember them!

CHIMO!   :salute:  :salute:  :salute:
 

Bobby Rico

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:salute: RIP troops

Friendly fire fatalities are always the hardest to accept.  Such a waste.  Thoughts go out to the families and to the pilots who have to live with the costly mistake.
 
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mudrecceman

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RIP for 3 more fallen soldiers, condolences to their Regimental Family and loved ones.

:salute:
 

vonGarvin

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Freeze said:
This is a reality of war, but this happens far too often.

RIP Soldiers :salute:
Actually, it  happens so seldom now that when it does happen, it's noteworthy.  Still, it's a tragedy and you're right, even once is far too often.
 

tomahawk6

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Prayers for the fallen and injured soldiers.
Unfortunately in combat mistakes are made that get people killed. When you are using live ammunition and bombs its a question of when not if that an accident will happen. In a CAS situation where the bad guys may be at danger close the odds go way up. Who knows if you are calling for an airstrike the situation is probably dicey to begin with.
 

Colin Parkinson

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Sigh this is not going to help keep Public support for the mission. My condolences to the families, friends and comrades.  :salute: :salute: :salute:
 

Good2Golf

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Folks, on topic please.  Info pertaining to the incident or condolences.  Another thread can be started and the incident referred to if someone so chooses.  I posted this item for what it was, a news report of an incident in theater, not as some basis for a statement.

Regards,
The Milnet.ca Staff
 

Loachman

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Johnnyfive said:
The U.S. seems to have a bad track record for friendly fire incidents.

With the bulk of the troops and aircraft in both Iraq and Afghanistan, they're bound to have the majority of incidents. Even with technological improvements since I last did any FACing, it's too easy for something to go wrong.

I got bombed by a CF5 on my FAC course in 1984. We were not in danger-close proximity to the target that we were engaging, it was not engaging us, it was in a known range (Gagetown, with Scotty Dog Woods as backdrop), and there was no urgent or highly stressful situation. Fortunately, the bomb was a thirty-three pound smoke-puff-emitting dummy. It went almost directly overhead, probably no more than ten metres to my left. It hit no more than 200 metres in front of me, and only went that far because it was going downslope. Also fortunately, the aircraft was a dual. Had it been a single-seater, it would have had two 20 mm cannon (the duals did not, due to the space taken up by the extra seat), and we usually engaged targets as close as that one with guns. Were it not for that simple twist of fate, more than a few of of my course mates and staff, a Kiowa, and assorted vehicles would have been well strafed.

It's a wonder that there are not more such incidents, and the low number is testament to the care given, effort made, and training undertaken to prevent them.
 

Scott-Payne

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My condolences and prayers to all involved.  Such sacrifices are hard to deal with.  I hope the survivors can focus on the good work those soldiers have done and remember that their sacrifices made lives better.
 
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