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Stories my recruiter told me.......

a78jumper

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Just curious, how many people here got coerced into a trade or classification they felt no affinity for, but accepted due to the pressure of a recuiter or the potential for a career.

Second question, how many people got put through hell on earth trying to remuster or reclassify into something more in keeping with their interests, let alone long term ambition? Especially after being told you could easily reclassify/remuster once you were in?
 

TheHead

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I was lucky I didn't get lied to at all.  The problem I'm seeing right now is instructors in BMQ telling recruits they are going to Afghanistan in August 2008. 

  A kid I know in basic was told he's going over with 2PPCLI in Feb O8.
 

a78jumper

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A year plus from now, that seems reasonable. What did they expect in the Army?

My problem I was recruited into the Navy, something I felt nothing for, and spent too much time training there for naught before donning a green uniform.

 

Remius

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Yes because that's what recruiter's do. They lie.  It's part of the training actually.   ::)

Recruiters are very dedicated.  It's actually a posting you have to be interviewed for.

Now, granted mistakes can be made (what large organisation doesn't).

I can easily ask "How many of you didn't listen to your recruiters properly and ended up in jobs they hate?"

People sometimes hear what they want to and fail to do proper research even though the info is available.

It's much better to tell an applicant the truth than to tell him "stories".  We don't have individual quotas to fill, there's no bounty to claim per head, no bonus.  The hours are long, they are away from home a lot, put up with a lot of crap, are on the front line daily against protesters and dissatisfied Canadians.  They work weekends and evenings.   But it can be a great job.

They believe for the most part in what they are doing.  It's mission oriented.  It's actually an eye opener for people who get posted in.  What benefit do they have in coercing or lying to applicants?

 

Keebler

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I dont understand why someone would just only ask a recruiter what trade to go into, i did my own research. I think i may have READ every single position on the recruiting website and continued to read them even after applying. Just in case i changed my mind before my offer etc.  Even after getting my offer, i have still been back to read more about the positions in the different fields of the military.

Honestly, i dont think the recruiters are out to get us, they do suggest things based on what they feel you may be better suited for if needed, but it is your FINAL decision, this is a voluntary military system. Noone forces you to jump into something such as the military.

Although, i do know my partner was steered into a navy career she did not want at the time, but it was not the recruiter that did it. Unfortunately it was due to a recourse during basic, and they couldnt get her trades training as they were full up, so they offered her another position and she accepted not knowing much about the position. So they offered her something else. But she made the best of it and is now in a Civi job she loves.  So i guess its what you make of it also.
 

Osotogari

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Recruiting has come a long way.  There was a time when they were somewhat economical with the truth, especially during the dark years (Mulroney's second mandate and the regime that followed).

Around that time a few people I talked to signed up for whatever trades they were told were available, having been told they could change trades later.  What wasn't passed on was the concept of closed trades, the difficulties invovled in remustering, and how much later (usually after their basic engagement) this could happen.

In my own case I was promised accordion lessons and loads of free water skiing.  After over a decade and a half, I haven't even seen an accordion and the closest I came to water skiing was falling through swamp ice while on the bangy boards.



 

mainerjohnthomas

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Hold back the howls of derisive laughter ladies and gentlemen,
In the mid nineties, when I was completing me degree, and looking seriously at getting out of the Reserves and into the RegForce, I was being recruited at CFRC Sinclair.  I went through the usual hoops and checks and interviews, academic transcripts, references personal, professional (Sr NCO's and OIC etc), while discussing my carreer choices:  Infantry, Communication, Artillery, Armour.  When the time came, it turns out that at the time, all that the CF wanted me (and my degree) for was medical school; I had a bright future in front of me doing short arm inspections on recruits and MIR Commandos.
I gave that a pass.  I had been a real soldier (albeit part time) too long to want to be a full time garrison pansy and REMF.  I'd rather be a real civilian who had once been a real soldier than a civilian in uniform.
If you know what you want in your life, and that is in the CF, don't take the offer if you cannot embrace living it.  Either wait for the opening you want, or seek another dream, because life is too short to hate what your doing, and the Army is too important to get less than your best.
OK you can laugh now.
 

KwaiLo

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My experience will be as anecdotal as most in this thread I think, but here goes.

I spoke with Capt. T______r a month or so ago, and had all of my questions answered.  I even had the opportunity to speak with a ROTP OCdt. who was there as a PAT.  There were quite a few things that I would not have thought of that they made sure I was aware of. 

It makes sense to me that the recruiters would be told to attempt to fill open slots.  I doubt that they would try to do that with people who were unsuited for the position.  And doing it with people who are both unsuited, and unwilling seems even more odd.

(The above post is personal experience, mixed with conjecture and smoke, YMMV)


(Recruiter's name amended by Moderator as PERSEC consideration.)
 

medicineman

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My recruiter and I ARGUED for the better part of an hour and a half at my interview - of the MOC's I applied for, my eyesight only quallified me for one, so he came in and said there'd been a hiccup - how'd I like to be an Admin Clerk?  I bluntly told him no and we proceeded to discuss that.  Then he said ok, that I had done well on the maths, electronics and electricity part, how'd I like to be a maritime electrician - I countered with Nav Weapons or Nav Comms and the fight was on...Anyways, we ended up (eventually) back at Med A.  I was even offered my commission if I promised to go back to university and finnish my degree at some point - of course I was offered 2 paper pushing classifications, so I was back telling him why I hated paperwork again.  I was told an untruth - when we settled on medic, I was told it would be an 18 month wait - I was sworn in 4 months later.

The big thing is knowing what you want to do (and meet the pre-requisites for), what you're back ups are and don't back down - he was trying to get me in as fast as possible into something that needed to be filled but that I would be miserable in.  If they want you that badly and you're willing to wait, they'll come back to you and with what you want.

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I was told to go Artillery, they never march anywhere or carry rucksacks.  So I did :warstory:, now I'm an airforce clerk  ;D
 

Keebler

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My experience with my recruiting military councillor was different, he actually told me that my first and second choice trades were not hiring and to wait for the new fiscal year before taking an offer. He said that there was a possibility my third choice may come up before and if it did, to decline and wait till the new numbers were out.  He said if they don't offer for the new fiscal year, i should re-weigh my options, i was not willing to settle, so i would have waited. As anxious as i was to join as quickly as i could, i would never settle.

Maybe some do try to push people through to get numbers filled up in positions that are needed, but obviously there are others out there that don't. I think this quote from a couple posts above is exactly how people should be looking at things. 

"If you know what you want in your life, and that is in the CF, don't take the offer if you cannot embrace living it.  Either wait for the opening you want, or seek another dream, because life is too short to hate what your doing, and the Army is too important to get less than your best."

If it takes 3 yrs to get the trade you want because they are not hiring, don't settle. Wait for it!!
 

Junior17

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I have nothing but good things to say about the Recruiting Staff at the Kitchener Detachment.  I first went in there in December 2006 and had all my questions answered and yes, they did put out certain job positions that they were in need of filling .. but I never felt pushed or coerced into anything.  I explained to them that I had a family and my wife's only request was that I would be around for my daughter's birthday in March.  They understood and helped me with my timing for putting in my application and scheduling my medical / interview / aptitude testing so that I could fulfill my family obligations yet still keep the application process rolling smoothly.  They didn't sugar coat any answers and were very blunt as far as what I was to expect and what life would be like for me while in the CF.  I have been in there many times since December and even now that I'm enrolled and leave in 2 weeks for BMQ I still go in and ask questions and they are more then happy to answer.
 

AverageJoe

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My experience at the recruiting centre was the exact opposite :)

They wanted me to have a good idea of what MOC I was interested in before they said they could help me with the recruitment process :)

I wanted them to guide me into a MOC that is physically and mentally suited for myself; lets face it, we can't all be super ninja sniper JTF2 pilot generals. HAHAHA ::)

However, the recruiters were very helpful once I picked my MOC choices. They had people working at the recruiting centre that were from the particular MOCs I had picked that were available for me to speak with about their experiences and such.

I even tried to talk the recruiters into giving me some direction into what MOC I should pick but they were pretty clear that I needed to have a good idea of what MOCs interested me before we can begin.

I guess having a good idea of what MOC you were interested in shows your seriousness in joining the Canadian forces. I'm sure they have plenty of people off the street coming into the recruiting centre on a whim without really knowing what they are really doing at the recruiting centre. ;D
 

mckee19

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my recruiter was unreal, he sat and talked about life with me for a bit then after getting an idea of what i was like suggested Infantry, even though i had not told him infantry was my goal. After telling him that's what i wanted He said he would do everything he could to get me into the trade i wanted (now i know that they needed infantry but at the time had no idea), He even called my house from time to time while it was being processed to just see how i was doing and to tell me things are moving along. Great guy and now anytime i need to talk to someone i go to him for advice because i know he isn't going to sugar coat things and will do what is best for you. really good guy, straight shooter and i appreciated that, having my very first experience with the army a good one made it that much more satisfying
 

kincanucks

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You never got coerced into anything.  You signed the papers and you made the decision.  What, you can't think for yourself?  The big mean recruiter twisted your arm and made you go Navy?  Grow up!  :crybaby:
 

medaid

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I never twist/coerce or lie to anyone that I recruit. I tell you to tell ME what YOU want to do. Once you've proved to me you've done some research into the things that interest you, I direct you to the gurus of those fields. If you can't do your own research and come blame me afterwards for Shanghai  you off to the wrong element and trade, I say 'tough luck, I TOLD you to do research'.

Again, you signed the dotted line. You committed. Now you deal with the consequences of your OWN actions.
 

Fry

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I have to agree here. The recruiters I dealt with OFFERED specific trades, usually the ones they were trained in, lol. They also said to RESEARCH every trade, as this is going to be your career for a long time, possibly life. Just because Sgt Recruiter was a mud gunner and said it was a wonderful career doesn't mean he told you that you should do that. If that's the case, I'd hate to see some of you sign for a loan at a bank.
 

Port Hope

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My experience was similar.  The folks at my CFRC refused to suggest a particular trade.  They made it clear to me that I better have an understanding of the different trades and be prepared to choose something that would suit my particular situation.  There was never an attempt to push me into a particular trade!  Every member of the CF that I met through the recruiting process was very helpful and they clearly had no agenda to make me do something that I did not want to do.
 

GUNS

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June 1967 put in for a transfer from Reserves to Canadian Army.

Went to see Recruiting Officer, asked many questions ie: education,religion, Do I like men, family life, Do I like men and what unit I prefer to join.

I asked for MP's, sorry no position open. How about Tanks,Guns or Rifles. No was my response, I'll wait for opening.

Tell you what says the Recruiting Officer, It will be alot quicker to transfer to the MP's if you are already in the Canadian Army.

Hook embedded in mouth, OK, says I. What outfit says the Recruiting Officer, Guns, says I. Welcome to the Canadian Army says the Recruiting Officer with evil grin on face.

Signed on the dotted line in 1967 and placed RCHA on my shoulders. In 1970 after numerous attempts to transfer to MP's and Unification had kicked in, I was offered Air Traffic Controller.

When I left the military for the last time I still had RCHA on my shoulders.

No life like it. :warstory:

 
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