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Soldier Operational Clothing and Equipment Modernization

OceanBonfire

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Uniform, camouflage and equipment modernization process marches on

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Starting at the end of September 2019, 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment will begin wearing coats and trousers, shell fragmentation protective body armor, bush caps, helmet covers and rank patches in the “Prototype J” mid-spectrum pattern.

Article / September 4, 2019 / Project number: 19-0220

By Eric De Lafontaine, Manager – Soldier Operational Clothing and Equipment Modernization, Directorate of Soldier Systems Program Management

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Lieutenant-Colonel Raymond Corby speaks to 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, about the Soldier Clothing and Equipment Modernization Trial at Garrison Petawawa on September 4, 2019. Photo: Private Robert Kingerski PA01-2019-0286

Ottawa, Ontario — Some 600 soldiers at 4th Canadian Division Support Base (4 CDSB) Petawawa will soon be standing out as they help the Canadian Armed Forces test a new Canadian Disruption Pattern (CADPAT) to help select a replacement camouflage for the current iconic woodland and arid CADPAT patterns.
The original distinctive CADPAT, revolutionary for its time, was initially developed in 1997. It is most closely associated with the Canadian Army but it is also worn by Navy and Air Force personnel when they work within Army lines.

Canadian Special Operations Forces personnel wear another pattern, MultiCam, which is not being replaced.
Since CADPAT was issued, there have been a number of advances made in camouflage research, specifically protection from detection by infra-red and other night vision systems.

Starting at the end of September 2019, 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment will begin wearing coats and trousers, shell fragmentation protective body armor, bush caps, helmet covers and rank patches in the “Prototype J” mid-spectrum pattern.

This new four-colour pattern falls in the middle of the camouflage spectrum, not overly emphasizing brown or green tones.

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A member of 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, asks a question to Lieutenant-Colonel Raymond Corby about the Soldier Clothing and Equipment Modernization Trial at Garrison Petawawa on September 4, 2019. Photo By: Able Seaman Elizabeth Ross PA02-2019-0286-007

While there have been over a dozen patterns tested, this is the first pattern to be taken out of a lab and tested using real soldiers, who are undergoing rigorous training for overseas operations. There will likely be adjustments made to the pattern resulting from this trial.

The trial will last until July 2020. During this time, the Human Factors Support Cell from the Soldier Systems Directorate within Director General Land Equipment Program Management will seek user feedback about the “Prototype J” pattern by conducting large-scale questionnaires.

The team will also conduct data collection, focus groups, and 3D body scanning to define how the current operational uniform and personal equipment can be improved.

This study will also include seeking out soldiers of smaller stature, including but not exclusively women, to ensure that the next generation of clothing and equipment fit the widest variety of soldiers possible.

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A member of 3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, inspects the prototype uniform from the Soldier Clothing and Equipment Modernization Trial at Garrison Petawawa on September 4, 2019. Photo By: Able Seaman Elizabeth Ross PA02-2019-0286-012

The Soldier Operational Clothing and Equipment Modernization (SOCEM) project, led by the Canadian Army Director of Land Requirements, in cooperation with Assistant Deputy Minister (Materiel) and Defence Research and Development Canada, has been working for over two years on harnessing technological advances to improve the functionality of Canadian Armed Forces operational uniforms and equipment.

The goal is operational clothing and equipment that protect and fit better while lightening the load carried by soldiers.

Transitioning to a single pattern from the current temperate woodland (green), and arid (tan) will also create efficiencies in terms of logistics.

With the final decision expected no later than 2022 and a full roll out 2027, the interim years will see mixed uniforms and equipment as items in the new pattern are gradually acquired and put into service.

http://www.army-armee.forces.gc.ca/en/news-publications/national-news-details-no-menu.page?doc=uniform-camouflage-and-equipment-modernization-process-marches-on/k01wx3ot
 

Zoomie

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It is most closely associated with the Canadian Army but it is also worn by Navy and Air Force personnel when they work within Army lines.
Apparently the author is blissfully unaware that LWCC is the dress of the day for all RCAF personnel (exception being aircrew).  None of us work within "army lines".
 

OldSolduer

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From the time I joined in 1975 until I retired from the Regular Force in 1999 the only camouflage we received was the garrison jacket.

 

Jarnhamar

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So 10 years from the time the project started until the full roll out will begin. The same amount of time it took us to fight and win WW1 and WW2 combined.
 

Ostrozac

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Hamish Seggie said:
From the time I joined in 1975 until I retired from the Regular Force in 1999 the only camouflage we received was the garrison jacket.

Not quite, there were also helmet covers for the steel pots!
 

Oldgateboatdriver

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I literally don't have a clue what a f**ck*** Army line is, but, assuming for instance that it includes any base under the direction of the Army (the old "camps"), I seem to recall a CANFORGEN that stated that  Naval personnel will wear the NCD when "combat" is the dress of the day, except when wearing the Cadpat is required for operational reasons.

And Hamish, you forgot also: in winter, we wore "whites" - that's a camouflage.  ;)
 

OldSolduer

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Oldgateboatdriver said:
I literally don't have a clue what a f**ck*** Army line is, but, assuming for instance that it includes any base under the direction of the Army (the old "camps"), I seem to recall a CANFORGEN that stated that  Naval personnel will wear the NCD when "combat" is the dress of the day, except when wearing the Cadpat is required for operational reasons.

And Hamish, you forgot also: in winter, we wore "whites" - that's a camouflage.  ;)

Once again you are correct.
 

Eye In The Sky

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Ditch said:
Apparently the author is blissfully unaware that LWCC is the dress of the day for all RCAF personnel (exception being aircrew).  None of us work within "army lines".

By Eric De Lafontaine, Manager – Soldier Operational Clothing and Equipment Modernization, Directorate of Soldier Systems Program Management

The only way the article could be worse was if they let the people who manage the CAF social media write-ups do it.  The crap that comes out on the various FB pages is pretty brutal...who is letting these people be the 'face/voice' of the CAF these days?  and why??
 

Eye In The Sky

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Jarnhamar said:
So 10 years from the time the project started until the full roll out will begin. The same amount of time it took us to fight and win WW1 and WW2 combined.

With the final decision expected no later than 2022 and a full roll out 2027, the interim years will see mixed uniforms and equipment as items in the new pattern are gradually acquired and put into service.

Jesus...the CAF just seemed to get thru the mix-match of OD combats and CADPAT...might as well start the visual gong-show up again so we can go back to looking like a wild turkey hunting club again. 

It's too bad the CAF has come to accept the underlined part above as 'ops normal'.
 

daftandbarmy

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Ummmm.... can't we just point at CANSOFCOM and say 'I'll have what they're having, please?'.
 

BDTyre

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daftandbarmy said:
Ummmm.... can't we just point at CANSOFCOM and say 'I'll have what they're having, please?'.

Too easy and it makes too much sense (and probably costs less). So...no.
 

FSTO

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Eye In The Sky said:
By Eric De Lafontaine, Manager – Soldier Operational Clothing and Equipment Modernization, Directorate of Soldier Systems Program Management

The only way the article could be worse was if they let the people who manage the CAF social media write-ups do it.  The crap that comes out on the various FB pages is pretty brutal...who is letting these people be the 'face/voice' of the CAF these days?  and why??

The worst one I recently saw was of the RCN Twitter page saying that NTOG was the same as US Navy SEALS. They got a severe bollocking over that faux pas!
 

ballz

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Ditch said:
Apparently the author is blissfully unaware that LWCC is the dress of the day for all RCAF personnel (exception being aircrew).  None of us work within "army lines".

I don't know what  LWCC stands for but we definitely have some air force FSAs working in Army units / HQs and they are wearing CADPAT.
 

mariomike

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ballz said:
I don't know what  LWCC stands for

Light Weight Combat Clothing ( LWCC )
https://www.google.com/search?sxsrf=ACYBGNTL6i1JoHUNbj23PIzOyUl8MH8BLQ%3A1567716666772&ei=OnVxXcnaLtCq_QaR7b7QDg&q=site%3Aarmy.ca+%22light+weight+combat+clothing%22+lwcc&oq=site%3Aarmy.ca+%22light+weight+combat+clothing%22+lwcc&gs_l=psy-ab.3...2795.4498..5237...0.0..0.197.741.0j5......0....1..gws-wiz.mv83DFaltnQ&ved=0ahUKEwjJ35_Yx7rkAhVQVd8KHZG2D-oQ4dUDCAs&uact=5#spf=1567716855571
 

Furniture

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The trial pattern looks pretty reasonable to me, as for the roll out timeline I imagine it will be staggered by base much like the CADPAT roll out was.

There is no need for most RCAF/RCN pers to be in a camouflage uniform at all, so using up the less than optimal camouflage uniforms in those environments makes good sense. If RCAF, RCN, and pers basic training stick to the CADPAT TW until stocks are used up, then switch to the new pattern it stands to reason that the rollout of new uniforms could take years to complete. 
 
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