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So You Want to be an officer, eh!

DAA

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Talk about "hijacked" threads .....  go back to the very "first" post on this thread.....so I will start over again....

What ever happened to...

"You are supposed to receive a letter from Pension Services"
 
M

MikeL

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Willing To Learn said:
I'm 16 right now and aspire to be an infantry officer possibly close-quarters protection, or JTF2. I'm getting ahead of myself and apologize.

For right now,  ditch the fantasy of being a JTF2 Assaulter and Close Protection.  Focus on getting through high school with good marks,  extra curricular activities, etc.  Also,  read up on the threads about RMC and applying;  there is a lot of good info and advice in this forum.

Also,  unless things have changed,  Close Protection is only open to NCMs.
1. THE CP QUALIFICATION IS OPEN TO ALL CF MEMBERS WHO MEET THE FOLLOWING PRE-REQUISITES FOR CP TRG AND EMPLOYMENT: 
      A. REG OR RES F MBR OF THE RANK OF CPL TO SGT 
      B. MOS ID QUALIFIED

Willing To Learn said:
I do not have any delusions that an officer is a dashing or anything Hollywood makes them out to be. I grew up listening to my father tell me stories about his time in the army and what they can be like. From these stories and from what history has told me good leaders never give orders that they themselves would be unwilling to follow. (Reason why I'm not joining bomb squad. No offence I have great respect for the soldiers who do that.)

If you do become a Infantry Officer,  you could be leading troops into harms way and possibly have some troops wounded/killed. 

Willing To Learn said:
I've just looked at the RMC page It sounds like people who go there are very full of themselves. I still want to go because its a university and I'd like to get a degree and I know it add a political edge. I do realize that politics plays a role in all parts of life that being said would it affect my chances of getting in if three genrations of my family have served as NCOs?


You believe RMC students/grads are full of themselves?  Yet,  you still want to attend,  and believe it will give you a political edge?  You also believe having some family before you who served as NCMs could hinder you?  Perhaps you are thinking too much about this.




 

JetMax

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(The question that I have is probably very common on the website, and I apologize if this thread is very similar to others. If that is the case, would you please send me to the right location?)

I am currently attending high school, and I am grade 11. I have been thinking about a career in the military as an officer. I have heard so many mixed things about life in the military, and I am not sure of the best route to take to pursue this goal. The RMC sounds like a really good option for me, but again, I have heard both good and bad opinions. I want the real truth about being an officer in the military, and what it takes to get there. I don't want to make a mistake and end up regretting my actions by doing the wrong thing...but right now, the CF just seems like a perfect opportunity.

Joining the military is a really big decision and I want to know if it is the right one. ANY suggestions would be appreciated, and just ask if I haven't been specific enough.
 

Cbbmtt

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I'm not in the forces, but have had many careers.

No one on here or in your life can tell you if you are going to like the job/career in the forces. I've talked to many women and men on these forums who love the forces and I have talked to a lot of friends who have gotten out as soon as their contract was up saying it wasn't right for them.

Look at the job descriptions of what is entailed and ask yourself if you like doing those things. If you don't like the sight of blood would you become a doctor? If you don't want to destroy the enemy would you want to be infantry? If you don't want to be the Officer who possibly could be responsible for the loss of life, do you want to be an Officer?

I don't want to destroy the enemy as much as I want to support the men and women who get the job done, that's why I'm applying. You just have to ask yourself if it's something you want to do. Read all the forum and you will get a clear understanding of peoples opinions on here.

 

TangoTwoBravo

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JetMax said:
(The question that I have is probably very common on the website, and I apologize if this thread is very similar to others. If that is the case, would you please send me to the right location?)

I am currently attending high school, and I am grade 11. I have been thinking about a career in the military as an officer. I have heard so many mixed things about life in the military, and I am not sure of the best route to take to pursue this goal. The RMC sounds like a really good option for me, but again, I have heard both good and bad opinions. I want the real truth about being an officer in the military, and what it takes to get there. I don't want to make a mistake and end up regretting my actions by doing the wrong thing...but right now, the CF just seems like a perfect opportunity.

Joining the military is a really big decision and I want to know if it is the right one. ANY suggestions would be appreciated, and just ask if I haven't been specific enough.

If your gut is telling you to apply as an officer through RMC then you should go for it. Your gut is a pretty good compass for what you want.
 

Navy_Pete

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There is no one general description for what an officer 'does' in the military.  It's all very trade/rank based, and even then there is a lot of variety.  The only true general statement you can make is that you will probably be doing a lot of paperwork.
 

JetMax

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Thanks for the replies.

How about the Royal Military College? Is it better to do the ROTP through RMC or a Canadian University like Queen's? Also, even though it's late for me (I am 16), is it still beneficial to join up with the cadets?
 

PPCLI Guy

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Navy_Pete said:
The only true general statement you can make is that you will probably be doing a lot of paperwork.

The only true general statement is that, other than pilot trades, you will always be a leader.
 

ballz

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JetMax said:
How about the Royal Military College? Is it better to do the ROTP through RMC or a Canadian University like Queen's? Also, even though it's late for me (I am 16), is it still beneficial to join up with the cadets?

There's a few debates on here about RMC vs Civie U that already if you do a search. You'll probably find a few of my posts arguing that civilian university is better and no I haven't changed my mind since then.

As for cadets, I'll offer (personal bias, of course) that you'd be better off doing other things, especially since in 2 years time you wouldn't end up being in a leadership position in cadets.
 

myself.only

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JetMax said:
Also, even though it's late for me (I am 16), is it still beneficial to join up with the cadets?

While I cannot speak to what is done in every Cadet Corps / Squadron, it is my unit's practice to warn off potential recruits that are 16 or older, ideally steering them towards our Affiliated Reserve unit.  Simply, the cadet program is not designed to readily accommodate those who join late and - at least initially - most of your peers will be 13.
Ballz is most likely correct that you will not gain any leadership position within 2 years.

However, there are always cadet units out there that will drop you into whatever other 16 year olds are doing and everyone in the program has met a cadet who went on a senior / instructor level course their first summer. So you should probably ask the cadet questions to the CO / adult staff of your local cadet unit.

In the end, while a mature 16 year old that wants to apply himself in cadets may not earn a lot of shiny badges, he can still gain a lot of personal development from a properly delivered cadet program.  After all, you will end up doing something during the time you have remaining before heading off to uni / RMC, it's just a question of what you invest your time and effort into. Some things look sexy on a resume, other things will round you out as a person, but nothing is a sure-fire guarantee for every person looking at your application / resume. 

That's my :2c:
 

FJAG

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JetMax said:
Thanks for the replies.

How about the Royal Military College? Is it better to do the ROTP through RMC or a Canadian University like Queen's? Also, even though it's late for me (I am 16), is it still beneficial to join up with the cadets?

Let me qualify my response that I went to neither. When I went through I attended an officer training program that took people straight out of high school. I earned my degree much later in life. On the other hand I have seen both RMC and civilian university graduates and can say it doesn't depend on the program but the individual. That said though, an RMC experience provides a network of contacts and shared experiences that can be quite helpful throughout your career. If you do have an option and the university education you are looking for are available at both places, I would give the nudge to RMC.

I want to caution you. Some of the things which you say makes it sound like you expect that the opportunity to become an officer is simply up there for grabs. Its a competitive process and will depend highly on your academic standing and physical fitness for starters. You will also need to display leadership potential and to an extent, citizenship qualities such as awareness of current events and a history of community activities or team involvement. Cadets can be part of the later but preferable would be service in the reserves. The later would also give you a no-risk chance to experience the military lifestyle.

The truth about being an officer quite simply is that to be a good one you need to be prepared for hard work and long hours and mostly to accept the responsibility for the welfare of those subordinate to you.

:cheers:

 

ModlrMike

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PPCLI Guy said:
The only true general statement is that, other than pilot trades, you will always be a leader.

I think it's more true that you will always be seen as a leader. Whether you are in fact a leader is a separate issue.
 

TangoTwoBravo

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Jetmax,

If you enrol as an officer you will be a leader, with all the responsibilities that entail. If you feel you are up to it then you should apply. The training system will develop your leadership abilities, and you will find out soon enough whether you can make it. If you possess the basic characteristics and are open to learning new ways to motivate people you will get through and then grow as a leader. You won't know if you don't try.

As for RMC etc applying for ROTP is a good idea if you are in high school. Where you actually end up going to university (RMC vs civilian) tends to wash out. RMC and Queens (and the others) are all good schools. Other branches/environments may be different, but in the Army Combat Arms we don't really care what school you went to besides whichever of the Combat Training Centre schoolhouses you go through and then Foxhole U later on.

There are many threads out there on ROTP. Cadets can help, but at 16 you are getting a little old to start. If you are indeed serious about joining the CF as an officer through ROTP then you should focus on your grades and extra-curicular activities that will make you stand out. Things like sports, leadership positions in community groups or summer camps etc can all help.

Best of luck.
 

JetMax

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Again, I am grateful to all for your replies...I have decided by what I have heard and what you have told me that cadets is not the way to go. I will focus on developing my physical fitness and leadership abilities. I know that community involvement is also important, so I will start to volunteer for some local organizations.

I want to caution you. Some of the things which you say makes it sound like you expect that the opportunity to become an officer is simply up there for grabs.

Thank you for saying this. It helped me to realize that the goal is not easily achievable, and I have taken a new attitude towards being in the military. I am ready to push myself and hopefully increase my chances of being accepted.
 

jeffb

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I am not sure where you are but there used to be a Co-Op program available in some areas. It would be a great way to earn some credits and to give you a taste of the military. Check with your guidance counselor at school or local recruiting center if this program still exists and is available in your area.
 

HeyJhon

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Hi everyone,

first of all, sorry for my bad english, I am doing all my possible to be understandable.

So, I actually would like to join Forces as MARS or Pilot. As far as I know,anyone with a Bachelor's degree is eligible for these MOS by direct entry. ( The MARS officer I once spoke to at school told me there was other MARS graduate in letters, history, mathematic, french... )

I really would like to do one of these military job but, only for somes years in active duty, then, I would move to reserve while being medic, which is the civil job that I WANT to do too.

Alors (I am out of synonyme for "So" in english!), with this plan, would I be eligible  to go to CMR of Saint-Jean-Sur-Le-Richelieu, do my CEGEP (pre-university), then do my BACH in medecine in civil university and serve as MARS/Pilot or should I only study in civil before apply to direct entry?

Thank you for your time, have a nice day and again, sorry for my horrible english.
 
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