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Sexual Misconduct Allegations in The CAF

daftandbarmy

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I do think there is also an element of ‘wanting to be like other execs in Ottawa’ (ie. PS) and there is (was, anyway in my experience) similar use of ‘fashionable lexicon’ in communicating in cross-Departmental senior meetings. I think that affects (erodes?) the otherwise pure (moral, professional, such as it is today) state of military senior leaders.

Regards
G2G

'He's BLUF-ing', remains one of my favourite expressions :)
 

QV

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Had he given due consideration to the victim or her husband, he might have realized earlier that writing such a letter was betraying a good person who was still under his command.

One of the reasons the CAF is in its current steaming pile of trouble is because we suffer from moral disengagement. We too easily minimize the harm caused by the behaviours of the people we see as our team. We too quickly minimize the injury inflicted on those who are not from out team. We are ready to make excuses or justifications for abhorrent conduct after a few cases of good performance. I've seen it with drugs, with many cases of drunk driving, and I've seen it with NCOs on a leadership course spending several drunken hours attempting to bash through the door of a female recruit while shouting demands for sex (she submitted her release fairly quickly there after by the way). Too many COs want to offer "oh, but he's an outstanding field soldier" and "this is so out of character, he would never do this again" all working toward the "this doesn't need a remedial measure; we can manage this informally." This is not malice on the part of some leaders; it's a recognized social psychological phenomena. Until we wake-up and hold people to the standard of conduct required of the CAF, there will continue to be incidents where the institution fails both victims and offenders. There will continue to be incidents where junior ranks question the moral compass of senior leaders, and there will continue to be incidents where the public questions the ability of the military to govern itself.

We can eject people and turn our back to them without remorse for performance. Same needs to be true for conduct.
Was there any thought to the damage to cohesion and morale that could arise with the support offered Hamilton?

Ultimately this was a bad judgement call, one that should have been very obvious. I’m not sure there is an easy recovery from this kind of moral disengagement. Such a poor poor move by an otherwise exemplary example of a soldier.
 

TCM621

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I find that (some? Most? Many?) GOFOs lose the plot and (their subordinates) because they are not true to themselves and come across as inauthentic. I see lots of bluster and buzzwords and misplaced attention to tiny details.

The very best ones I have been around are not loud; are humble; are not afraid to have a normal conversation with someone below their rank and actually devote time and energy to thinking about defence and are not afraid to admit a mistake.

Really, these are qualities that we want in any leader at any level, so this should not be a difficult problem to fix.
I don't find loud or quiet really has much to do with it but if you can't chat with a subordinate because of some misguided hang up about rank, that is definite red flag. Over the years, I have known a number of officers who ended up in senior leadership positions, and Senior Chiefs, well enough to get a decent sense of their character. The best of them could have a conversation with a corporal in civvies without the corporal ever suspecting they were a GOFO. In fact, I know a couple of cases where that happened.

Hillier was a good example, although he isn't one of the ones I knew well. The first time I met him was in the smoke pit where he was hiding his smoking from his wife. He asked us about our jobs and they we continued to have a smoke pit chat about the event we were at. Two days later we had another chat in a different smoke pit and again it was a very cordial chat you might have with anyone despite the enormous difference in rank.

In short, a lot of the character of an officer can be seen if they look through the jnr ranks as they walk by them. The best CO I have ever had stopped new people in the halls if he didn't recognize them and learned their name, section, when they got tthere etc. He probably knew everyone who had worked there more than 6 months by face if not name. He was also a hard taskmaster who demanded results but no one wanted him to leave when he got promoted.
 

Kilted

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Has anyone assessed the impact on operational readiness of these non-stop accusations, and investigations, especially when they now involve people in the Intelligence branch? Not diminishing the severity of accusations, but questioning whether there is a plan for the surviving CoC to pick up the slack. Who is in charge? Is it clear to everyone beyond the regimental level?
Or influence by foreign actors?
 

TCM621

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Was there any thought to the damage to cohesion and morale that could arise with the support offered Hamilton?

Ultimately this was a bad judgement call, one that should have been very obvious. I’m not sure there is an easy recovery from this kind of moral disengagement. Such a poor poor move by an otherwise exemplary example of a soldier.

This is the problem. With proper communication, there doesn't have to be damage to cohesion or morale. I think the most likely response would have been "I don't like it but I understand why it is being done" and that is a pretty good outcome in a situation like this where we have competing (if unequal) levels of responsibility.
 

daftandbarmy

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I don't find loud or quiet really has much to do with it but if you can't chat with a subordinate because of some misguided hang up about rank, that is definite red flag. Over the years, I have known a number of officers who ended up in senior leadership positions, and Senior Chiefs, well enough to get a decent sense of their character. The best of them could have a conversation with a corporal in civvies without the corporal ever suspecting they were a GOFO. In fact, I know a couple of cases where that happened.

Hillier was a good example, although he isn't one of the ones I knew well. The first time I met him was in the smoke pit where he was hiding his smoking from his wife. He asked us about our jobs and they we continued to have a smoke pit chat about the event we were at. Two days later we had another chat in a different smoke pit and again it was a very cordial chat you might have with anyone despite the enormous difference in rank.

In short, a lot of the character of an officer can be seen if they look through the jnr ranks as they walk by them. The best CO I have ever had stopped new people in the halls if he didn't recognize them and learned their name, section, when they got tthere etc. He probably knew everyone who had worked there more than 6 months by face if not name. He was also a hard taskmaster who demanded results but no one wanted him to leave when he got promoted.


"It is, indeed, singular, how a man loses or gains caste with his comrades from his behaviour, and how closely he is observed in the field. The officers, too, are commented upon and closely observed. The men are very proud of those who are brave in the field, and kind and considerate to the soldiers under them. An act of kindness done by an officer has often during the battle been the cause of his life being saved. Nay, whatever folks may say upon the matter, I know from experience, that in our army the men like best to be officered by gentlemen, men whose education has rendered them more kind in manners than your coarse officer, sprung from obscure origin, and whose style is brutal and overbearing. My observation has often led me to remark amongst men, that those whose birth and station might reasonably have made them fastidious under hardship and toil, have generally borne their miseries without a murmur;—whilst those whose previous life, one would have thought, might have better prepared them for the toils of war, have been the first to cry out and complain of their hard fate."

- Recollections of Rifleman Harris, Old 95th, with Anecdotes of his Officers and his Comrades -
 

OldSolduer

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Has anyone assessed the impact on operational readiness of these non-stop accusations, and investigations, especially when they now involve people in the Intelligence branch?
This mirrors my thoughts as well. Was this individual in the pocket of foreign agents? If so, which nation?

Nations don't have friends per se - they share common interests but whose to say some of our allies aren't gathering information ?
 

Halifax Tar

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This mirrors my thoughts as well. Was this individual in the pocket of foreign agents? If so, which nation?

Nations don't have friends per se - they share common interests but whose to say some of our allies aren't gathering information ?
Who are you wondering if they were/are in the pocket of foreign agents ?
 

CBH99

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I'm not following the mention of foreign agents...

Is the suggestion that some of these complaints are false, and from foreign agents, to cause investigations into the top brass & reorganizations of the top brass -- and then exploit that situation somehow?

Or...??
 

Halifax Tar

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I'm not following the mention of foreign agents...

Is the suggestion that some of these complaints are false, and from foreign agents, to cause investigations into the top brass & reorganizations of the top brass -- and then exploit that situation somehow?

Or...??
I'm lost by the sudden insertion of espionage conspiracy theory too...
 

CBH99

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Don't get me wrong. Sounds like a fascinating discussion, even if it's right out of left field!!

But yeah, I'm with Halifax Tar on this one. Kinda lost.
 

Blackadder1916

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I'm not following the mention of foreign agents...

Is the suggestion that some of these complaints are false, and from foreign agents, to cause investigations into the top brass & reorganizations of the top brass -- and then exploit that situation somehow?

Or...??

I think that "foreign agents" came up as speculation related to this post from a couple of days ago.

Head of Canadian military intelligence school removed amid misconduct probe​


And not to stir the pot of conspiracy theories, but the poster joined this site, posted that one message and has not been heard from since.
 

NavyShooter

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Looking at the state of things sometimes I wonder if we'd even really need to be a target of foreign espionage services to disrupt our plans and activities, or if they'll just let us keep on our own path and watch us do their work ourselves...?

I'm sure that the oft told tales of the 'honey trap' do exist in the real world, however, the reality of most of the allegations we've seen seems to involve senior personnel abusing their power over junior personnel, and then having other, similarly powerful people protect them from the consequences.

For this to involve foreign intelligence services, they'd REALLY be playing the long game - getting someone in uniform, into a position where they are subjected to (or available to be?) sexual abuse/mistreatment/assault, then wait a few years to bring it to the light of the media...? That beggars belief that any foreign intelligence service would be able to do something like that.

I mean, I am not read in on details on any of these situations, but it does not seem to be a foreign power...it seems to be small heads thinking for big heads.
 

Bruce Monkhouse

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I think that "foreign agents" came up as speculation related to this post from a couple of days ago.



And not to stir the pot of conspiracy theories, but the poster joined this site, posted that one message and has not been heard from since.
Posted from a Govt of Canada computer though...
 
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