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Sexual Misconduct Allegations in The CAF

Kilted

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dapaterson

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The wording in this is confusing. Is the article saying that Vance has two illegitimate children?

The claim is that Jon Vance fathered two of her children, and subsequent testimony indicates that he has not paid support.
 

Bruce Monkhouse

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Easy for him to disprove should he have the confidence to do that....
 

FJAG

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One partial solution would be to amend NDA 18.3 to style the position of Provost Marshall as a mandatory GiC appointment (as the CDS, JAG and military judges are), removing the potential for inappropriate CDS influence on the appointment or, indeed, CDS refusal to appoint a PM.
They'd better add a "how to charge and try a wayward CDS, JAG, mil judge and PM" provision to that amendment.

:giggle:
 

dapaterson

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They'd better add a "how to charge and try a wayward CDS, JAG, mil judge and PM" provision to that amendment.

:giggle:
Or, you know, the GiC could just remove them and replace them (other than a judge) by stipulating that they serve at pleasure.
 

Furniture

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Wouldn’t it be better for provincial forces (SQ, OPP, RCMP under contract) than Muni forces? Direct accountability to provincial SolGens, thence to.... 🤷🏻‍♂️ (Hesitant to say MND, sadly, given how that worked out recently)
I was thinking RCMP initially, but said local in the end as I believe Halifax, Victoria, Edmonton, Ottawa, etc. police are more than capable, and smaller forces would likely call in the larger forces if they lacked the requisite skills/experience.

Obviously it would have to be coordinated at the federal/provincial level, but the main point is that the experts should be doing it.
 

lenaitch

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I was thinking RCMP initially, but said local in the end as I believe Halifax, Victoria, Edmonton, Ottawa, etc. police are more than capable, and smaller forces would likely call in the larger forces if they lacked the requisite skills/experience.

Obviously it would have to be coordinated at the federal/provincial level, but the main point is that the experts should be doing it.

I suppose it would be do-able on a contract or cost-recovery agreement, depending on the scope (sexual offences only?). For larger locations, such as Ottawa, Gagetown, Borden, etc., you would be adding several thousand people to their 'population'. For areas policed by the RCMP, OPP, SQ, the forces might be large but the local detachment resources are geared to the local workload. I can't readily think of an instance in Ontario where a 'smaller police force' would be impacted. Crime units aren't like fire departments sitting around waiting for the bell to go off; in OPP-land, they are already run off their feet as it is.

And what about incidents on deployments, or where witnesses, etc. are currently on deployment? Even on a cost-recovery basis, out-of-country investigative travel can create logistical and investigative problems for civilian agencies.
 

daftandbarmy

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I suppose it would be do-able on a contract or cost-recovery agreement, depending on the scope (sexual offences only?). For larger locations, such as Ottawa, Gagetown, Borden, etc., you would be adding several thousand people to their 'population'. For areas policed by the RCMP, OPP, SQ, the forces might be large but the local detachment resources are geared to the local workload. I can't readily think of an instance in Ontario where a 'smaller police force' would be impacted. Crime units aren't like fire departments sitting around waiting for the bell to go off; in OPP-land, they are already run off their feet as it is.

And what about incidents on deployments, or where witnesses, etc. are currently on deployment? Even on a cost-recovery basis, out-of-country investigative travel can create logistical and investigative problems for civilian agencies.

Our SNCO Corps are the backbone of any disciplinary practises in the military. The more support we give them, the better things will get.

Sadly, it seems we've frittered away their powers to the point where, ironically, the most senior are the least powerful, like the 'Command Chief' type folks who seem little more than bag holders for their bosses when, in fact, they should be helping to keep their bosses in line along with the rest of us riff raff :)
 

Loachman

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I hate saying this but I feel like we're in a position in the CAF where in many cases the only way someone will see justice is to go to the media and essentially force the CAF to take something seriously and investigate.
A few decades ago, I was asked by a female Corporal to be her Assisting Officer in an extremely troubling (to me as well) non-sexual harassment case. Her unit had consistently and continually stonewalled her while supporting her harasser, who was mistreating other women in his section the same way. At least one of the supporters of the harasser was a female Captain, which rather shocked me. My "client" even received written death threats, which she handed to the local MP platoon - who quickly "lost" them.

She ultimately approached media, out of desperation, the day prior to contacting me, and appeared in an interview on television that night.

I was posted out a month or two later, before I was able to complete work on her grievance, but managed to find another Captain well-versed in grievance procedures, who was successful.

I had a hard time believing that crap like that happened in the Canadian Forces, but her story was consistent and well-documented (including three supporting statements from other victims) and gave me no choice.

I'd like to think that things have improved since then. Such a hope appears to be futile, but at least these cases are receiving more attention and perhaps some corrections are beginning to take effect.

I know Bernie Boland, mentioned in one of the earlier articles, as well, but have not seen him since 1989. He was a good guy then, and that has obviously not changed.
 
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