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School education paid for children of slain soldiers

Should children who have a parent killed over seas have the CF pay for their college or university?


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Jarnhamar

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Do you think that children of CF members who have had a parent killed while over seas should have their college or university paid for?

I was thinking, the CF will put someone through school (where they are also paid right?) and in return they need to serve atleast 4 years. That's not that long considering someone gets their education paid for and gets paid (while probably not a whole lot) to goto school. Afterwards they have, in a way, guarenteed 4 years of work.

Would it be that hard on the system to offer an education to these kids who have lost  parent?  Lets say half of our fallen members from overseas had one kid,thats 40 positions in university.  Is that a lot compared to what gos through RMC or put through other schools?

What about if only certain courses were available?
 

BernDawg

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We have enough trouble caring for our sick and injured members let alone shelling out for higher education.  However I think that we (the CF) should set up a trust fund with an initial whooping contribution of public funds for this purpose.  This fund should be self supporting and in time could offer scholarships to other members kids (eventually we will not be in combat).
    I also think that it should come with caveats such as 4 yr max or partial disbursement for longer programs i.e. pre med etc.
My 2 cents
Bern

 

George Wallace

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I could be wrong, but it was recently brought up to me that this is really the job of DVA.  They have the mandate/policy/direction (whatever) to provide tuition and funds for books to the children of fallen Service Personnel.  All of these other charities and funds being set up by individuals, Unit Associations, etc., would only be providing other monies to these children, not covered by DVA, such as money for Transportation, Rent, Utilities, Food, and other sundries.  In essence all their expenses would eventually be covered.  Also don't forget that SISIP would be involved. 
 

armyvern

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George Wallace said:
I could be wrong, but it was recently brought up to me that this is really the job of DVA.  They have the mandate/policy/direction (whatever) to provide tuition and funds for books to the children of fallen Service Personnel.  All of these other charities and funds being set up by individuals, Unit Associations, etc., would only be providing other monies to these children, not covered by DVA, such as money for Transportation, Rent, Utilities, Food, and other sundries.  In essence all their expenses would eventually be covered.  Also don't forget that SISIP would be involved. 

Correct. There are some benefits available under DVA and CPP Orphan Benefits:

The Centre Link
 

Armynewsguy

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Canada Company is already helping out with this.They recently awarded three scholarships funds in Toronto. For more information check out the following links.

print story   http://www.armee.forces.gc.ca/lf/English/6_1_1.asp?id=2444

print story   http://www.armee.forces.gc.ca/lf/English/6_1_1.asp?id=2296

web site    http://canadacompany.ca/index.asp


Armynewsguy
 

armyvern

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CSA 105 said:
Yes, this is and should continue to be a VAC responsibility, publicly funded, of course.

Remember, folks, DVA is the American Department of Veteran's Affairs, commonly known as VA.

Australia also uses DVA, while Britain uses Veterans-UK.

We have Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC-ACC).

Hmmmm, last I checked either was acceptable (and a google of DVA hits from Canada will take you to VAC/DVA (which exists as per the Department of Veterans Affairs Act):

http://www.psagency-agencefp.gc.ca/survey-sondage/2005/results-resultats/18/index-e.htm

http://www.pmprb-cepmb.gc.ca/english/View.asp?x=161&mp=133

http://www.fsco.gov.on.ca/english/pensions/penbulletinonline/supfinserv/nop/refapprove/Public_Service_Alliance_Sept.26.2007.asp

Perhaps the devil is in the details as they are most properly termed the DVAC.

 
K

KJL

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BernDawg said:
We have enough trouble caring for our sick and injured members let alone shelling out for higher education.  However I think that we (the CF) should set up a trust fund with an initial whooping contribution of public funds for this purpose.  This fund should be self supporting and in time could offer scholarships to other members kids (eventually we will not be in combat).
    I also think that it should come with caveats such as 4 yr max or partial disbursement for longer programs i.e. pre med etc.
My 2 cents
Bern

Think your on the money here BernDawg, think there's something to this idea. Kind of brings the idea of looking after each other full circle.
 

Michael OLeary

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The Royal Canadian Regiment has established The RCR Education Fund for Children of Fallen Soldiers which will provide bursaries to the children of soldiers who have died serving in or with The RCR. 

education_fund_graphics_200px.jpg
 

Jarnhamar

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Thanks for the posts and info guys, I'm going to donate to the RCR fund.
Cheers
 

ProPatria031

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We already have kick arse life insurance plans which would be quiet capable of funding education, so we don't need the military giving out more money then it already has. I think its the parents responsibility to have the correct life insurance plan set up to insure there child is taken care of.
 

George Wallace

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ProPatria031 said:
We already have kick arse life insurance plans which would be quiet capable of funding education, so we don't need the military giving out more money then it already has. I think its the parents responsibility to have the correct life insurance plan set up to insure there child is taken care of.

Question:  Do you hold an Insurance Policy, other than SISIP?

If you do, have you read the "War Clause", a very broad and encompassing clause that covers all acts of violence caused by any form of insurgency?

You could save thousands of dollars by cancelling an Insurance Policy that you as a member of the Canadian Forces are exempted from collecting from.
 

AirCanuck

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BernDawg said:
We have enough trouble caring for our sick and injured members let alone shelling out for higher education.  However I think that we (the CF) should set up a trust fund with an initial whooping contribution of public funds for this purpose.  This fund should be self supporting and in time could offer scholarships to other members kids (eventually we will not be in combat).
    I also think that it should come with caveats such as 4 yr max or partial disbursement for longer programs i.e. pre med etc.
My 2 cents
Bern

I think this was the best answer... said pretty much what I wanted to say.  The idea of a self-sufficient fund maintained through fundraising and donations isn't all that far-fetched - for example, the Air Cadet OPC League maintains a fund yearly on the same basis to put people through 'flying scholarships' where they get their pilot's license - worth about 12k per scholarship, and about 50 or 60 are given out each year (if not more) - that would more than cover the original numbers mentioned by Flawed in the original post.
 

The Bread Guy

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Shared in accordance with Copyright Act for fair use/research/discussion purposes only.

Reed wants children of fallen soldiers to get free university education
Luke Hendry, Belleville Intelligencer, 23 Jun09
Article link

If Kevin Reed has his way, the children of fallen Canadian soldiers will soon be able to attend their choice of university -- for free.

Reed, 42, is the new honorary lieutenant-colonel of 31 Service Brigade, an army reserve unit in southwestern Ontario.

He's now trying to get all Canadian universities to follow Newfoundland and Labrador's Memorial University in offering free education to children of soldiers killed in the line of duty.

He told The Intelligencer he was inspired by the work of retired general Rick Hillier, until recently the Canada's chief of defence staff. Hillier is now Memorial University's chancellor.

"My goal is by the fall to have all Canadian universities signed on for this," Reed said.

To date, he said, he's managed to recruit the University of Ottawa -- of which he's a graduate -- plus the Universities of Windsor and Calgary.

He said Allan Rock, the Ottawa school's president, vice-chancellor and a former federal cabinet minister and ambassador to the United Nations, was quick to support it.

Though details may vary by school, Reed said the basic premise is the same: education for any child of Canadian Forces staff who are killed as a result of an operational mission or training for such a mission dating back to the start of Canada's war in Afghanistan.

"It's (for) both theatre of combat and peacekeeping.

"There's some 30 children in Canada today in that category," Reed said.

"Their child would be eligible for four years of tuition paid for and two years of room and board provided they live on campus and eat at the school."

Like his new honorary role with the service brigade, Reed downplayed his efforts.

"They make the ultimate sacrifice. My contribution is so small in comparison to theirs.

"I've just been going to one university at a time, and we'll continue to do so until we get 'em all."

 

dapaterson

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31 Service Brigade?  WTF?  There ain't no such animal.

There's 31 Canadian Brigade Group, based out of London ON; there's 31 Combat Engineer Regiment, based out of St Thomas ON; and there's 31 Service Battalion, based out of Saint John NB.

Methinks a little fact checkign might be in order before going to print...
 

The Bread Guy

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Good point - another article on his appointment describes it thus:
.... Reed, 42, a Belleville native, successful businessman, and one of if not the youngest honorary officer in the Canadian Forces, has just begun a minimum three-year term as honorary lieutenantcolonel of 31 Service Brigade, an army reserve unit of about 350 troops in London, Windsor and Hamilton ....
Making any more sense at all?
 

dapaterson

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Sigh.  It sounds like people are "engaging in carnal relations with a canine" to put it in polite terms.


1.  The Svc Bns in the Reserve force are being re-organized so there is a single one within each CBG area of responsibilities.

2.  In 31 CBG, that means the Svc Bns in Windsor, London and Hamilton (21, 22 and 23) are under a single CO, with a single RSM.  Legally, all three remain seperate units.  LFCA (the HQ above 31 CBG) has decided to place the Svc Bns under the Area Support Group (ASG).

3.  There has been no renaming or amalgamation of the Svc Bns yet; that will happen over time.  The reallocation to 2 ASG from 31 CBG is a local arrangement that is temporary; only the Minister of national Defence can permanently re-allocate units from one formation to another.

4.  As previously stated, 31 Svc Bn already exists in New Brunswick; before any re-naming of Svc Bns occurs a comprehensive national plan has to be completed to avoid confusion (assuming the new Svc Bns take on the numbers of their local CBGs).

5.  There is no 31 Svc Bde.  The Minister has never created such a formation.  Anyone who states otherwise is delusional / lying / stupid (or some combination of the three).


In this case, though, it sounds like there may be some internal CF politics at play, so the information provided to the press could be incorrect.  Suffice it to say that te planned changes to the Svc Bns are not fully embraced in all corners; some people may think they are going to establish truth on the ground ("We're a Brigade!") to then argue from a position of strength.
 

The Bread Guy

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This from CBC.ca:
Four universities in Calgary, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Ontario are offering scholarships to children of parents killed in active Canadian military missions to help them attain undergraduate degrees.

The University of Calgary, Memorial University of Newfoundland, the University of Ottawa and the University of Windsor have created a Project Hero scholarship to honour fallen soldiers.

"It is an expression of support for Canadian Forces soldiers and their families, and a way of honouring those who pay the ultimate price for serving their country," said U of C vice-provost (students) Ann Tierney in a statement on Tuesday.

"We hope this scholarship will help the sons and daughters of these military personnel realize their dreams and plans by making a university education possible after suffering such a loss."

The program would begin Sept. 1, and would waive the cost of undergraduate tuition for four years, as well as on-campus residence fees for the first year. Students must be under the age of 26 and be Canadian citizens or permanent residents ....
 

Spanky

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Regardless of where LCol Reed is from...... kudos to him for his efforts.  :salute:
 

ENGINEERS WIFE

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Free tuition offered for fallen soldiers' kids
Updated Wed. Jul. 1 2009 8:13 AM ET

CTV.ca News Staff


Four Canadian universities will be covering the cost of tuition for the children of soldiers killed in the line of duty to help them complete undergraduate degrees starting this fall.

The Project Hero scholarships are available at Memorial University in Newfoundland, the University of Ottawa, the University of Windsor and the University of Calgary.

The scholarships, which become available on Sept. 1 this fall, will cover four academic years.

"It's the least we can do to express our respect and gratitude to members of our armed services who put their lives on the line for Canada everyday," Allan Rock, the president of the University of Ottawa, told CTV News Channel Tuesday.

"At the university we feel this is a very tangible way to say to the families of the people that are serving for Canada, that we value their contribution and we want to do something to demonstrate that gratitude."

He said that first-year residence fees would also be waived for those eligible.

"Hopefully it will take some pressure off families and reduce pressure," he said.

The scholarships were launched by retired general Rick Hiller, who is now serving as chancellor of Memorial University in his native Newfoundland.

Ottawa alum Kevin Reed, now a Toronto-area businessman, came up with the idea and was instrumental in getting the program together, Rock said.

"It is my goal to get broad-based, national support from all Canadian universities," Reed told The Canadian Press.

Many of the fallen Canadian soldiers' children are many years away from university age and Rock said the program is intended to be long-term.

"We want the families to know we are going to be there," he said. "This is a long-term commitment."

Rock added the program will be reviewed every five years to see if improvements can be made.
http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20090630/univ_tuition_090701/20090701?hub=Canada

 
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