• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Russian military build up.

Sythen

Full Member
Subscriber
Reaction score
0
Points
210
I couldn't find a Russian Megathread, so decided to start one.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/russia/7919113/Russia-approves-65-per-cent-defence-budget-increase.html

Russia approves 65 per cent defence budget increase

The Russian government has approved a 65 per cent increase in the country's defence budget over the next three years as it rushes to upgrade its ageing Soviet-era military machine.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/feedarticle/10386480

Associated Press= MOSCOW (AP) — President Vladimir Putin promised Saturday to re-equip the Russian air force with hundreds of new aircraft as part of an ambitious military modernization program.

Speaking at an airshow at Zhukovsky just outside Moscow marking the air force's 100th anniversary, Putin said the military will receive more than 600 new combat planes and 1,000 helicopters by 2020.

He said boosting the air force is a key priority for the government. "I'm sure, each of us will feel pride for the country, for the people who build such aircraft and pilot them," he said.

More on both links.

I know there was an article not long ago about Russia devoting over 100b to its Navy, but I can't find it.

In a post ERC posted in the NATO thread, he said he believes Eastern Russia will become Asian. It got me thinking of whether or not it will be a peaceful transition.
 

Sythen

Full Member
Subscriber
Reaction score
0
Points
210
Sythen said:
I know there was an article not long ago about Russia devoting over 100b to its Navy, but I can't find it.

Found it:

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/07/30/us-russia-putin-navy-idUSBRE86T1D320120730

(Reuters) - President Vladimir Putin oversaw the start of construction of one of Russia's newest generation submarines on Monday and vowed to boost nuclear naval forces to safeguard the country's position as a leading sea power.

Warning that its navy would protect top energy producer Russia's interests in the oil-rich Arctic, Putin led the ceremony to begin building the submarine Prince Vladimir, named after the ruler who founded a precursor state to modern Russia.

The vessel is the fourth Borei class submarine, designed to carry one of the country's newest and most powerful intercontinental nuclear missiles, the Bulava, or Mace.

"We believe that our country should maintain its status of one of the leading naval powers," Putin told a meeting of naval commanders and government officials at the sprawling Sevmash shipbuilding yard in northern Russia.

More on link.
 
F

fraserdw

Guest
No biggy, Russia has zero population increase, no immigration and a birth rate that rivals our own.  Each year as individual Russian wealth increases less folks are going to be available for conscription and Putin's rattlin' saber is going to get as short as a butter knife.
 

tomahawk6

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
62
Points
530
They dont have the money for a build up.What they really need is a sustainment program. But there isnt the money for that either.
 

Sadukar09

Member
Reaction score
0
Points
210
tomahawk6 said:
They dont have the money for a build up.What they really need is a sustainment program. But there isnt the money for that either.

I have a feeling all those new aircraft will end up rusting like this T-90A.

51f136ad21f1.jpg


 
F

fraserdw

Guest
Does anyone know if he was wearing a shirt while overseeing the start of production?  :moose:
 

Journeyman

Army.ca Legend
Subscriber
Reaction score
1,100
Points
940
According to today's RIA-Novosti Press report Russia's continuing to replace their older SSBNs with the new Borei-class. The second of eight boats, the Yury Dolgoruky, is expected to join the Alexander Nevsky by September. The Nevsky is further scheduled to test-fire the another "Bulava" SLBM in November as part of the modernization programme. After multiple failures, the Russians halted test firing until 2010; unfortunately they've all been successful since.

In the same article, Admiral Chirkov (Commander, Russian Navy) said that the first Yasen-class submarine, Severodvinsk, may also enter service by the end of this year. From what I understand, it's supposed to replace the Akula SSNs and the Oscar SSGNs.
 

Retired AF Guy

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
211
Points
710
Journeyman said:
In the same article, Admiral Chirkov (Commander, Russian Navy) said that the first Yasen-class submarine, Severodvinsk, may also enter service by the end of this year. From what I understand, it's supposed to replace the Akula SSNs and the Oscar SSGNs.

According to Wiki you are correct. However, the Russians are having difficulties in getting the first boat operation. The Wiki article on the Yasen states that the design of the sub first started in 1977 and the construction of the first boat has been going in spurts and stops ever since.The first sub was supposed to have been operational years ago and the latest estimate is sometime next year. 

However, unconfirmed sources indicate that there are still serious problems plaguing the Severodvinsk and these have yet to be rectified. For example, last Monday, The Moscow News quoting an unnamed military source, reported the sub was having the following problems:

“During trials, the Severodvinsk revealed that its nuclear power plant does not produce the planned power levels. And the boat does not meet the required noise levels. With such serious shortcomings the ship can not be accepted into the military fleet,” Interfax quoted the military source as saying.

“The new torpedoes with the required characteristics are still not ready. The product that has been created is highly volatile and therefore can not be used to arm submarines,” said the source. He added that if the delays continued for too long, torpedoes of the type that exploded on the ill-fated Kursk submarine might have to be used.
 

Journeyman

Army.ca Legend
Subscriber
Reaction score
1,100
Points
940
Retired AF Guy said:
According to Wiki .....
Friends don't let friends quote Wiki~!  :nod:

Amongst several glaring military-related errors in Wiki, the Bulava SLBM was "launched for the first time from its standard carrier, Borei-class submarine Yury Dolgorukiy," which as noted above, isn't even in the water yet.  :facepalm:

Although from credible sources, yes, the new SSN programme has had its moments of rocks & shoals.
 

Cloud Cover

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
30
Points
530
Sadukar09 said:
I have a feeling all those new aircraft will end up rusting like this T-90A.

What kind of assault gun is that in the upper left quadrant?
 
F

fraserdw

Guest
Thucydides said:
Not 100% sure, but it appears to be an ASU-85.

The casement deck and engine deck line are too high from one another.

http://www.inetres.com/gp/military/cv/at/ASU-85.html

I am thinking an even older SU

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SU-122

Not the difference in casement and engine deck heights.  Also note the hatch. 

The gun length suggests a 100mm or larger gun:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SU-100.  Could be a SU85, same general outline but less armour and less pronounced hatch.
 

Retired AF Guy

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
211
Points
710
Journeyman said:
Friends don't let friends quote Wiki~!  :nod:

Amongst several glaring military-related errors in Wiki, the Bulava SLBM was "launched for the first time from its standard carrier, Borei-class submarine Yury Dolgorukiy," which as noted above, isn't even in the water yet.  :facepalm:

Although from credible sources, yes, the new SSN programme has had its moments of rocks & shoals.

PM inbound.
 

Retired AF Guy

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
211
Points
710
whiskey601 said:
What kind of assault gun is that in the upper left quadrant?

I don't think its a SU-100. The SU-100 had a prominent cupola on the right-side of the vehicle. The SU-100 also had a fairly long barrel. I'm going with a SU-85.
 

vonGarvin

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
20
Points
430
Here is a line drawing of an Su-85:

su_85-03168.jpg


I suspect that's what it is, sans extra stuff on it.  The lines, barrel length, etc, all look fairly consistent.


 

Fishbone Jones

Army.ca Myth
Subscriber
Donor
Reaction score
941
Points
1,060
whiskey601 said:
What kind of assault gun is that in the upper left quadrant?

You'll likely get better discussion if you took this to the AFV recognition thread http://forums.army.ca/forums/threads/48893/post-427868.html#msg427868

.............and ended the derail ;)

Milnet.ca Staff
 

Edward Campbell

Army.ca Myth
Subscriber
Donor
Mentor
Reaction score
1,265
Points
1,160
This is reproduced under the Fair Dealing provisions of the Copyright Act from the Globe and Mail:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/putin-reshuffles-russias-top-military-brass-after-defence-ministers-ouster/article5151477/
Putin reshuffles Russia’s top military brass after defence minister’s ouster

VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV
MOSCOW — The Associated Press

Published Friday, Nov. 09 2012

President Vladimir Putin on Friday reshuffled the nation’s top military brass following the defence minister’s ouster, and instructed the new top military officer to be friendlier to Russia’s defence industries.

Mr. Putin’s advice to General Valery Gerasimov, appointed chief of the armed forces’ General Staff, appeared to shed more light on the reasons for the ouster of Russia’s powerful defence minister Anatoly Serdyukov earlier this week.

While Mr. Putin linked the ouster to a probe into the alleged military corruption, most experts believe that Mr. Serdyukov was sacked because of an intensifying behind-the-scenes battle for the distribution of 20 trillion rubles ($635-billion) that the Kremlin plans to spend on buying new weapons through 2020.

Mr. Serdyukov demanded higher quality and cheaper prices from the military industry, often refusing to sign new contracts for months. He criticized arms makers for continuing to produce Soviet-era designs instead of developing new weapons, angering industry leaders with strong Kremlin connections.

Under Mr. Serdyukov, the military purchased amphibious assault vessels from France, bought Israeli drones, Italian armoured vehicles and other foreign weapons.

“We have had a problem with the Defence Ministry changing its demands to the industries,” Mr. Putin said on Friday. “Of course, we must seek cutting-edge items, but we need a certain stability too. I strongly hope that you will be able to develop a stable and good partnership with our leading defence plants.”

Alexander Golts, an independent military analyst, said that Mr. Putin’s statement sent a message to the military to “forget your demands for the industry to produce modern weapons and be happy with those the defence industries are capable of producing.”

“The top military brass is expected to carefully pretend that it’s getting state-of-the-art hardware, not the obsolete weapons designed 30 or 40 years ago,” he wrote in a comment in the online newspaper ej.ru.

Mr. Golts added that along with angering Mr. Putin’s lieutenants with links to defence industries, Mr. Serdyukov’s intransigence created a political problem for the president himself by threatening to erode his core support base of blue-collar workers.

Gen. Gerasimov replaces Serdyukov loyalist General Nikolai Makarov. The 57-year old Gerasimov is a career military officer who graduated from a Soviet tank academy and previously served as the commander of the Central Military District, a job that made him responsible for Red Square military parades.

As part of Friday’s shakeup, Mr. Putin also sacked a deputy defence minister and promoted two other generals.

Mr. Serdyukov has been succeeded by Sergei Shoigu, who spent only half a year as the governor of the Moscow region after serving as Russia’s emergency situations minister for two decades.

Mr. Serdyukov ouster came as a surprise because he had previously enjoyed Mr. Putin’s support for Russia’s most radical defence reforms in decades. The effort led to the dismissal of 200,000 officers and the disbanding of 90 per cent of Russia’s military units in a bid to turn Russia’s Soviet-style military into a leaner and a more mobile force similar to Western armies.

When Mr. Putin fired Mr. Serdyukov on Tuesday, he linked the move to a probe launched last month by the country’s top investigative agency into the sale of military assets, including real estate. The agency says the state suffered damages of 3 billion rubles ($95-million) in just a few cases reviewed.

Adding to the intrigue is the fact that Mr. Serdyukov is married to the daughter of one of Putin’s closest allies, Viktor Zubkov, who served as prime minister in 2007-8 and continues to wield strong clout as chairman of the state-run natural gas giant, Gazprom.


My opinion, which I admit may be poorly informed, is that President Putin is rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. Russia is, potentially, a rich and important country but its weak and unsophisticated culture is holding it back. That culture made Lenin/Stalin not only possible but popular; despite a rich heritage in art, music, literature and so on, Russia was and remains socially and politically backwards and until the government addresses that problem it will remain poor and weak.

Reform of the Russian defence superstructure is an answer to a problem Russia doesn't have.

Who is Russia preparing to fight? China? It is to laugh ... or cry.
 

GAP

Army.ca Legend
Donor
Mentor
Reaction score
20
Points
380
The Arms Manufacturers got rich producing functional crap, why would they want to change?
 

Retired AF Guy

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
211
Points
710
E.R. Campbell said:
My opinion, which I admit may be poorly informed, is that President Putin is rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic. Russia is, potentially, a rich and important country but its weak and unsophisticated culture is holding it back. That culture made Lenin/Stalin not only possible but popular; despite a rich heritage in art, music, literature and so on, Russia was and remains socially and politically backwards and until the government addresses that problem it will remain poor and weak.

The Russians were screwed the day they were conquered by the Mongols; its been up and down since then, but mostly downhill.
 

Robert0288

Full Member
Reaction score
0
Points
210
I listened to an interview with an ex-KGB guy earlier this week who described the Russian political culture as an amalgamation of the Military(Security), Industry, and Criminal.  I guess buying French, Israeli and Italian hardware was pissing in too many cereal bowls at once.
 
Top