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RCAF Fighter Sqn ReOrg

SupersonicMax

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I am not making this my hill to die.  I could not care less for Cold Lake. I am just presenting facts as I know them and how, at the tactical/operational level, it would be have second and third order impacts that, from an uninformed person may not be obvious, but that cannot be ignored.  I don't believe it would be in the best interest of the RCAF, even if it solves some of the technician retention issues.  Moving it to Comox though (or anywhere in close proximity to suitable airspace) could work.  Edmonton?  Nope.

I only interacted in this thread because I feel I have relevant experience that could contribute to the discussion. I know there are bigger fish to fry at the Goverment level but for the CAF, I sincerely hope that fixing retention issues that have long-term impacts on our readiness is a priority.
 

SeaKingTacco

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SupersonicMax said:
I am not making this my hill to die.  I could not care less for Cold Lake. I am just presenting facts as I know them and how, at the tactical/operational level, it would be have second and third order impacts that, from an uninformed person may not be obvious, but that cannot be ignored.  I don't believe it would be in the best interest of the RCAF, even if it solves some of the technician retention issues.  Moving it to Comox though (or anywhere in close proximity to suitable airspace) could work.  Edmonton?  Nope.

I only interacted in this thread because I feel I have relevant experience that could contribute to the discussion. I know there are bigger fish to fry at the Goverment level but for the CAF, I sincerely hope that fixing retention issues that have long-term impacts on our readiness is a priority.

Comox could probably work again for a single Sqn. The airspace all still exists. The tough part would be dropping iron, unless you plan on specializing on throwing it into the Pacific Ocean. The closest land range is likely Ft Lewis.

The reality is that Cold Lake isn't going anywhere, soon.
 

Loachman

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Good2Golf said:
As opposed to the plethora of viable IFR alternates in the YWA-YOW corridor in a 146.  ;)

Farmer's fields must have become a lot more rare since I last flew around there...
 

Good2Golf

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Loachman said:
Farmer's fields must have become a lot more rare since I last flew around there...

You guys used hope on the 136, I used an AFCS to stay out of the fields, 146 decent (although crappy not having the 4th axis) and then the RNP/RNAV 0.3 dream IFR machine.  ;D
 

Loachman

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We just flew under the cloud, or stayed on the ground if ceiling or vis were too low. I never found the "lack" of IFR capability to be limiting in any way.

There was bad weather forecast along the northern edge of Lake Superior as we were preparing to depart from Wainwright after RV83 (when we exercised the CAST Composite Helicopter Squadron, which included three older Chinooks). The Chinook guys were bragging that they would beat us home as they were going IFR. They encountered icing, turned back out of it, and spent the night somewhere. We flew the shoreline and had no problem. I think that we dropped to 400 feet once or twice at one point, but vis was generally great.

Our min vis for VFR in Germany was 800 metres, and our min VFR altitude was 250 feet (any higher risked getting hit by a fighter, even though they were not supposed to be below 500 feet). Weather seldom limited us cross-country. Tactically was different, as any precip on the bubble destroyed depth perception as well as reducing vis. Even if it didn't, one would not have been able to see far enough for recce anyway.

We encountered icing conditions (murk and precip, 1C OAT, slush forming on windscreen lower edge) on my first CH146 ticket ride, over Lake Ontario on vectors to Hamilton, and then lost radio and intercom due to loud buzz caused by the early static problem, then watched our NDB needle rotate to the 090 position and lock. Not fun at all. I was not a fan of Helicopter IFR before that, and even less so afterwards. Fortunately, the buzz died out fairly soon, and we turned back. I had stated that I did not think that conditions were safe due to forecasts and actuals during the brief and we really should have stayed on the ground.
 
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