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PFT Syllabus

jdl902

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Can anyone share the general syllabus for PFT (meterology, instruments, etc)?  It seems the training system is moving along these days so I'd like to get the jump on some review while I've got some time on my hands.

Thank you!
 

Mab163

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jdl902 said:
Can anyone share the general syllabus for PFT (meterology, instruments, etc)?  It seems the training system is moving along these days so I'd like to get the jump on some review while I've got some time on my hands.

Thank you!

I would like to see the syllabus too if someone can share it. Thank you in advance!
 

jdl902

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More specifically the flight syllabus.  I have 24 hours a day to study the ground portion but it looks like we spend less than 30 hours total in the cockpit so these are the items I want to focus on!  The bit of info I've found indicates basic circuits (takeoff and landing obviously) and some aerobatics.
 

bradley247

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It's not wise to get ahead of yourself, you are given plenty of time to learn what you need to know. If you sit there with a pile of books in front of you, what you read will have no context. Memorizing things in advance, with no context or direction, is more likely to bite you in the ass than help.

Ground school is dead simple, it's straight forward and the review material for the tests is solid, nobody fails ground school (and if you do, you have no business in an airplane). The flying stuff is very procedural and specific, not something you can pick up just flipping through the book.

If you want some general review, flip through the "From the Ground Up" and the "RCAF Weather Manual", but I'd highly recommend against memorizing circuit procedures and power settings before the course.

Just my 2 cents...
 

Sf2

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PFT isn't about what you know already.

Its about how you assimilate things you don't know.
 

jdl902

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Interesting advice but I'm still looking for some info on what we're actually going to learn in the airplane; a quick bullet list of the top 5 topics/maneuvers would be fantastic!  I figure if I have a general familiarity going in that will help me assimilate things more quickly.  I'm not talking about memorizing gouges or trying to cover all the ground material in advance.  If you think that sharing some info on the flights would short circuit the evaluation process just say so and I'll not ask again but I'm not going to be convinced to not brush up in advance if I can :)  Even if it doesn't help in the end, how can learning more be bad if I don't have anything else to do right now than push-ups?
 

SupersonicMax

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Dude,

You'll learn in time. Stop asking.  You can safely assume that you'll learn take off and landings.
 

Strike

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SupersonicMax said:
Dude,

You'll learn in time. Stop asking.  You can safely assume that you'll learn take off and landings.

Stalls, turning, climbs, etc.  Literally, the basics.
 

rotrhed

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jdl902 said:
Interesting advice but I'm still looking for some info on what we're actually going to learn in the airplane; a quick bullet list of the top 5 topics/maneuvers would be fantastic!  I figure if I have a general familiarity going in that will help me assimilate things more quickly.  I'm not talking about memorizing gouges or trying to cover all the ground material in advance.  If you think that sharing some info on the flights would short circuit the evaluation process just say so and I'll not ask again but I'm not going to be convinced to not brush up in advance if I can :)  Even if it doesn't help in the end, how can learning more be bad if I don't have anything else to do right now than push-ups?

It can be bad when you learn it incorrectly. If you go into PFT with a pre-conceived belief that you know something only to discover you're wrong, it will take time on course to un-learn it. And that's time you don't have.

Like others that have some knowledge of the process, I suggest you arrive in YPG with an open mind, a clear plate and the willingness to accept direction without questioning the reasons. Having a read of FTGU and the ACWM will give you a good academic foundation. The syllabus is subject to change but as a guide, you'll be taught airmanship, a variety of emergencies, level flight, turns, climbs/descents, airspeed changes, takeoffs, landings, spins, stalls and perhaps acrobatics. I strongly suggest you do not attempt to self-study in these areas because whatever you do will either be incorrect or instill undesirable habits and behaviours.

You have less than 30 hours for the system to determine if you are worth the investment. Self-study at your own risk.
 

SkyHeff

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bigzoomie said:
You have less than 30 hours for the system to determine if you are worth the investment.

As a student log book reviewer for my flight, 19 hours under the new PFT system seems to be "a lot" of hours.
 
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