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Parachutist wings from cadets on my PRes or RegF uniform

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PuckChaser

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Crazy Caveman72 said:
So does anybody know if I can wear more than one set of "wings" at a time?
Maybe finish both courses before you try to figure out how to dress up your bling? Or is the only reason you're trying for para because it gives you something on your uniform?
 
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Hi,

I'll be graduating from my BMOQ in one month, and I did my basic parachutist course as a cadet. Can I wear my wings on my navy uniform ?
 

Humphrey Bogart

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MiniMegamanZero said:
Hi,

I'll be graduating from my BMOQ in one month, and I did my basic parachutist course as a cadet. Can I wear my wings on my navy uniform ?

Yes you can, they can be sewn on the NCD jacket as well.
 

PuckChaser

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Someone will challenge you on it, so make sure you have a copy of your course report entered in on your pers file if its not already there.
 

Eye In The Sky

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MiniMegamanZero said:
Hi,

I'll be graduating from my BMOQ in one month, and I did my basic parachutist course as a cadet. Can I wear my wings on my navy uniform ?

Assuming you'll be purchasing a mess kit in the near future, they are also worn on the Navy one, just in a different spot; "A single miniature cloth metallic embroidered badge, sewn on the left sleeve, 0.6 cm above the circle in the upper row of officers’ rank lace".

 

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mariomike

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MiniMegamanZero said:
I'll be graduating from my BMOQ in one month, and I did my basic parachutist course as a cadet. Can I wear my wings on my navy uniform ?

See also,

Basic Parachutist Course for Army Cadets & CIC: Question & Answer 
https://army.ca/forums/threads/4371.475
20 pages

Asked and answered throughout the thread,

For official reference,

Canadian Forces Dress Instructions
http://www.cmp-cpm.forces.gc.ca/dhh-dhp/pub/ins-265/index-eng.asp
Date Modified: 2018-01-19


 

Eye In The Sky

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mariomike said:
For official reference,

Canadian Forces Dress Instructions
http://www.cmp-cpm.forces.gc.ca/dhh-dhp/pub/ins-265/index-eng.asp
Date Modified: 2018-01-19

The other ref that applies to Specialist (and flying) badges is CFAO 55-10 -- THE CREATION AND AWARDING OF CANADIAN FORCES FLYING AND SPECIALIST SKILL BADGES.
 

Bzzliteyr

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PuckChaser said:
Someone will challenge you on it, so make sure you have a copy of your course report entered in on your pers file if its not already there.

This is critical, go on Employee Member Access Application (EMAA) and check your Member's Personnel Record Resume (MPRR) to see if they're there.
 

Eye In The Sky

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I do find this "jump wings will be challenged" odd.  Are there people serving "walting"?  I wear Wings (aircrew);  if I was posted outside my current Sqn, I wouldn't expect someone to say "hey...prove you are entitled to those". 
 

Blackadder1916

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Eye In The Sky said:
I do find this "jump wings will be challenged" odd.  Are there people serving "walting"?  I wear Wings (aircrew);  if I was posted outside my current Sqn, I wouldn't expect someone to say "hey...prove you are entitled to those".

I don't find it odd at all.  What would you think if a 19 year old Officer Cadet (or Private) was on a BMOQ (or BMQ) with no prior service (Reg or Res) and on the first day after issue of uniform was wearing parachute wings?  Wouldn't it be questioned?  Or on the first day of their TQ3 or Phase 2?  The wearer would have a simple answer and part of that answer would be that his attendance on the jump course as a cadet was documented.  Oh, the example of the 19 year old OCdt was from my BOTC in Chilliwack in the 1980s and not only were his wings questioned at BOTC but again when we started Phase 2 Infantry (where I was also challenged about wearing Aeromedevac wings).
 

Eye In The Sky

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I'd probably not think "they must have went to the tailor and wanted some LCF for their Basic grad parade".  I see people with aircrew wings, jump wings, submariner dolphins in any combo of those.  It's never crossed my mind to say "hey!  you earn those???".  :dunno:  Personally, I've never known anyone who had jump wings on that didn't earn them.  I'd like to believe people have enough integrity to just wear what they've qualified for?

If anyone said to me "prove you earned those or take them off", I'd do neither.  I might laugh a little before I walked away...
 

Eye In The Sky

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Crikies...I didn't realize so many former CAF mbrs blinged it up so badly.

I was going to say I don't remember a serving CAF member ever wearing Wings when they weren't a qualified jumper but then I remembered this story.

Point taken.
 

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dapaterson said:
The Caterpillar Club (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caterpillar_Club) is what you're thinking of; membership is reserved to those who had to jump out of a disabled aircraft.  So, if a group of freefall parachutists were on a plane that developed problems, and they and the pilot had to jump, only the pilot would be granted membership, as the freefallers were planning to jump regardless.

So I guess DB Cooper wouldn't qualify then, eh?
 

Furniture

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Eye In The Sky said:
Crikies...I didn't realize so many former CAF mbrs blinged it up so badly.

I was going to say I don't remember a serving CAF member ever wearing Wings when they weren't a qualified jumper but then I remembered this story.

Point taken.

The CAF culture is to make a joke about  people with only a CD, or one of the jubilee medals. It's not too surprising that some feel the need to embellish their service when those that served beside them likely mocked their lack of "real" medals.
 

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Furniture said:
The CAF culture is to make a joke about  people with only a CD, or one of the jubilee medals. It's not too surprising that some feel the need to embellish their service when those that served beside them likely mocked their lack of "real" medals.
Yes this joke culture is unsat. Most dudes join and beg for a tour. Misfortune or injuries, family issues, illness and bad luck can impede this.


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Blackadder1916

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Furniture said:
The CAF culture is to make a joke about  people with only a CD, or one of the jubilee medals. It's not too surprising that some feel the need to embellish their service when those that served beside them likely mocked their lack of "real" medals.

Since the lack of respect for the CD is mentioned, I'll respond (as I have a couple of times before) by quoting a post I made a long, long time ago. 

Blackadder1916 said:
One of my lasting memories of someone talking about the decorations and medals that he was wearing occurred in 1994.  I had the good luck of having a COS date out of Lahr that permitted me to arrange my passage home on the Queen Elizabeth 2 sailing out of Southampton on 8 June.  I was able therefore to drive to Normandy and spend 6 June 94 (50th Anniversary of D-Day) visiting some of the memorials and events there; take the ferry across to England; turn my car over to Cunard for loading onto the ship and then relax for several days on the North Atlantic.  The voyage was billed as a “D-Day Memorial” cruise.  Many of the passengers were WW II veterans, mostly American, some Brits, and at least one Canadian.

One of the events that occurred on the ship was the Captain’s Welcome Party.  Dressed in finest bib and tucker, you go through the receiving line, have your photo taken and then proceed to the most important part of the soiree… getting a drink.  Some of the other passengers were wearing medals, ribbons or devices that showed that they had served.  I was in mess kit as were a few of the other passengers including a Van Doo LCol and a husband & wife who were both pilots in the USAF.  It was particularly easy for the Van Doo and me to be noticed in the scarlet monkey jackets. 

A few people had approached me with the inevitable questions about who we were and what were we doing.  I was chatting with a lady when we were approached by a gentleman in a maroon jacket that included Cdn para wings and several medals.  He introduced himself and joined in the conversation which naturally turned to where had you been.  He had served with the 1 Cdn Para Bn as a private during the war and had made the jump into Normandy and over the Rhine. 

The lady with whom we were chatting asked about the medals and wings he and I were wearing.  I probably would have answered in my typically flippant manner about 12 years undetected crime (C.D.), 6 months getting a suntan and not getting a venereal disease (UNEFME) and 4 years wine and beer tasting (SSM with NATO bar), but he replied first by drawing her attention to the one medal we had in common, the Canadian Forces Decoration.  I was surprised when he told her it was the one that he was most proud to wear.    The lady asked why.  His reply impressed me and later that evening I wrote an account of what he said, maybe not verbatim, because we had imbibed several beverages, but close enough for government work.

He said.  “It’s easy to be a soldier when everyone is or wants to be a soldier; when being in uniform is the normal thing to do.  The true measure of a man is his commitment to serving his country when there is little chance of excitement, or glory or getting medals.  This medal (he indicated his CD) shows people that we pledged a significant portion of our lives to serving our country when few others would, doing things that we didn't necessarily want to do and that were not very glamorous.  These (he indicated his 4 or 5 wartime medals) I got for spending 3 years in uniform doing what most guys my age were doing. Was it hard work and dangerous? Yes. But mostly I had a lot of fun doing it.”

Since then I’ve had a different perspective on those little pieces of ribbon that we wear.
 
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