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National crisis: fentanyl & other super-opiate overdoses

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Jarnhamar

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Chispa said:
In BC, instead of prescribing methadone too addicts, heroin is given free of charge; investigation reveals they do not like the high of methadone and sell it for heroin.


My relationship with my daughter is better than it's ever been," says James, 48. But James says it wasn't so long ago, her days were spent doing absolutely anything to score heroin. She used to steal hundreds of dollars' worth of meat from grocery stores and sell it on the streets. She even stole from Tia. "I took $500 out of her account and because of the lovely girl that she is, she never wanted to make me feel bad," James says. "If someone had told me I would do something so despicable — I never would have believed it."
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/crosstown-clinic-heroin-addiction-1.3779768

Just going through these examples and stories.
This mom stole $500 from her 24 year old daughter who has tumours growing on her spine and brain to support her drug habit. Now she gets free heroin twice a day and we're supposed to feel happy for her because she has a great relationship with her daughter? What a POS.
 

Chispa

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mariomike said:
But, what could happen to a guy back then? Get drunk and fall off your horse?  :)

If the fall didn't break your neck and kill you, you were probably on your own for the medical bills.

True: It's my understanding pre and post 1900 in the US/Canada, you generally paid Med bills, although in big cities for the mentally, etc., religious, privet organisations, public fund raisers with minimal amount contributed by the state, helping those without the means of payment. In Montreal by 1900 medical buildings were erected by the above mention, some facilities housed just commoners run by nuns, or first 2-3 floors were large wards the rest privet rooms reserved for those with $$$. During and post Second Anglo Boer War (SABW) or Second South African War (SSAW), seeing the need more medical facilities were established throughout the city, for all those returning from war, considering some returned 5+ years post war, all medical expenses free of charge; read this was same in Toronto... This carried on during FWW......

If I do harm through my experimenting with it, it is I who suffers, not the state.

Could be MT., was pointing to; “If I do harm through my experimenting,” not same as falling off a horse and paying med bills, more if he did harm like stealing, hurting, killing, etc.


C.U.
 

Chispa

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Two more die in Winnipeg from fentanyl, third in critical!

Police say fentanyl is suspected in the fatal overdoses of two men Saturday.

Police were called to the Mariaggi Hotel on McDermot Avenue around 12:30 p.m. after staff found a 30-year-old man dead in his room. At 9:30 p.m. police and paramedics were called to a Kinlock Lane home after receiving a report of two males “in medical distress.” A 22-year-old man died in hospital and a 21-year-old man remains in serious to critical condition.

Drugs and drug paraphernalia seized from both locations suggest fentanyl as the possible cause of death, said Winnipeg Police Service spokesman Const. Jason Michalyshen.

“All arrows are pointing in that direction at this point,” he said. “I think it’s quite clear what we are dealing with and the epidemic we are seeing in our community.”

The deaths come just days after a man and two women were found dead of a suspected fentanyl overdose in a home in the Maples. “Regardless of what your drug of choice is, if it’s contained within, and you don’t know it, it could kill you,” Michalyshen said.

“Criminal charges aren’t our priority here,” he said. “Our bigger and larger priority is what happened to these individuals? Are there other individuals we need to talk to? What is going on in our community and why are we talking about this day in day out week after week? I know we all want answers but I think the reality is it is going to take time before there are any significant changes.”

Fentanyl is being found in cocaine and other powder drugs which have been “cut” or adulterated with other substances by dealers to boost profits. “Sadly these individuals aren’t concerned about the safety and well being of their customers,” Michalyshen said. “This is about the almighty dollar.” The growing opioid crisis has the potential to strike anyone, from regular drug users to curious teens and the people close to them, Michalyshen said.

“Each and every one of these instances should raise the eyebrows of every single Winnipeger, every single Manitoban, that this is s a problem we need to deal with, not just by law enforcement,” he said.

http://www.winnipegsun.com/2016/11/21/two-more-die-from-fentanyl-third-in-critical



C.U.


 

Blackadder1916

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mariomike said:
. . . lack of empathy. They are our customers, our bread and butter.  . . .

[Pedantic gene moment]  Customers?  I don't know the expected terminology in your former service or the current billing/funding procedures for EMS in Ontario, but I would expect that "client" would be a more appropriate term.  Clients are "users" of professional (and other) services; customers are "buyers" of goods and services.  While they "may" be one and the same, most medical services (including EMS) in Canada are directly purchased by a government entity for the end beneficiary, often without involvement of the end user in that payment process.  [/pedantic gene moment]
 

mariomike

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Blackadder1916 said:
Customers? 

Customers.
http://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/contentonly?vgnextoid=9cf41bebbb176410VgnVCM10000071d60f89RCRD
 

mariomike

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Keeping them busy in Vancouver,

911 overdose calls break B.C. records, users 'going down everywhere'
http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bc-overdose-drugs-fentanyl-emergency-1.3869423
Bicycle paramedics armed with naloxone combing alleys at epicentre of battle to save lives.
 

ballz

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I'm not posting this to start the heated argument again... but perhaps renaming this thread or having some sort of Super Narcotics Legislation Thread that could be used to house these kind of articles (both for and against) is warranted.

British Medical Journal calls for legalisation of drugs
Nick Clegg and Baroness Molly Meacher say the UK’s drug policy has been irrational for 55 years

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/war-on-drugs-british-medical-journal-heroin-cannabis-cocaine-a7417171.html

The British Medical Journal has called for the legalisation of illicit drugs for the first time.

Prohibition laws have failed to curb either supply or demand, reduce addiction, cut violence or reduce profits for organised crime, the journal argued, saying the so-called 'War on Drugs' had been a failure.

It said the ban on the production, supply, possession and use of some drugs for non-medical purposes was causing huge harm.

“There is an imperative to investigate more effective alternatives to criminalisation of drug use and supply," the BMJ said in an editorial.

The paper’s editor-in-chief, Dr Fiona Godlee, and features and debates editor, Richard Hurley, pointed to the fact drug use has grown substantially worldwide, with a quarter of a billion adults worldwide having potentially taken illegal drugs such as cannabis, cocaine or heroin in 2014.

In the UK, a quarter of 15-year-olds may have taken illegal preparations of unknown quality and potency.

The BMJ said some countries have already removed criminal penalties for personal drug possession.

For example, Portugal replaced criminal sanctions for drug use with civil penalties and health interventions 15 years ago, while the UK’s new Psychoactive Substances Act criminalises the supply but not the use of synthetic drugs.

Some US states such as California have legal cannabis markets and the Netherlands has tolerated regulated cannabis sales for years.

The editors called for doctors to be at the centre of the debate on alternative policies to promote health and respect people’s dignity.

“Health should be at the centre of this debate, and so, therefore, should healthcare professionals,” they argued.

“Change is coming, and doctors should use their authority to lead calls for pragmatic reform informed by science and ethics.”

In the same issue, former Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg and Baroness Molly Meacher said the UK’s drug policy has been irrational for 55 years and argued this was the right time to establish a wider review of drug policy.

They urged the Government to reschedule cannabis for medical use and review policy on heroin-assisted treatment, which they said had shown positive results in Switzerland, such as a decline in drug use and crime and improvements in health and rehabilitation.

The Parliamentarians also called for an end to criminal sanctions for the personal possession and use of all drugs.

“British politicians should seriously consider introducing a version of the Portuguese model in the UK, involving a significant transfer of resources from criminal justice to treatment services,” they said.

They added that steps towards decriminalisation in the UK have already begun, with the Psychoactive Substances Act 2016, and argued changes to drug prohibition “could be good for the UK".

Ruth Dreifuss, former President of Switzerland and chair of the Global Commission on Drug Policy, said the need for more effective and humane drug policies was more urgent now than ever.

She argued the idealised notion of a “society without drugs” was an unattainable fantasy and said reforms must prioritise issues of public health, social integration and security, while respecting human rights and judicial process.

Decriminalisation can and must go further, she added.

In an upcoming report, the Global Commission will call for governments to regulate all illicit drugs, which it says would curb a massive revenue for organised crime worth an estimated $320bn.

From Wikipedia: The British Medical Journal is a weekly peer-reviewed medical journal. It is one of the world's oldest general medical journals.



As I said, I don't think healthcare professionals are the authority on this, nor police, nor politicians for that matter. I would like to read the actual article in the British Medical Journal to see the arguments that were made but unfortunately it seems protected for subscribers only.

 

Retired AF Guy

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ballz said:
I would like to read the actual article in the British Medical Journal to see the arguments that were made but unfortunately it seems protected for subscribers only.

You can sign up for a 14 day free trial subscription.
 

the 48th regulator

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http://www.campbellrivermirror.com/news/405508356.html#.WEnjetc1omw.facebook


15-year-old busted with 130 grams of fentanyl and other drugs


    by  Alistair Taylor - Campbell River Mirror
    Campbell River posted Dec 8, 2016 at 1:00 PM

Campbell River RCMP Street Crime Unit has made another significant arrest and drug seizure as a result of an ongoing investigation.

On Dec. 2, two people were arrested and charged with drug trafficking, a 15-year-old male from the Lower Mainland and a 27-year-old female from Black Creek.

A search warrant was executed at a local hotel and a significant amount of drugs and cash were seized.

In total, approximately 130 grams of fentanyl, 35 grams of methamphetamine, 35 grams of powder cocaine, 165 grams of crack cocaine, eight grams of MDMA, and 15 grams of marijuana.

The seizure, including a large amount of cash and a vehicle, has a street value of approximately $65,000.

“The reduction of organized crime is a priority of the RCMP. Campbell River street crime unit continues to focus on ensuring they intercept a strong establishment of a drug trade with influences from the lower mainland. These continued arrests have a waterfall effect on the crime rate in the city and ensure we maintain a safe community,” says Consts Sara Clark, media relations officer for Campbell River RCMP.

Both the male and the female are expected to appear in court later this month
 

Jarnhamar

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http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/edmonton/frantic-efforts-to-save-man-overdosing-on-fentanyl-captured-on-rcmp-video-1.3889321


Hard to imagine being a cop and having to deal with these morons every day.
 

RedcapCrusader

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Jarnhamar said:
http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/edmonton/frantic-efforts-to-save-man-overdosing-on-fentanyl-captured-on-rcmp-video-1.3889321


Hard to imagine being a cop and having to deal with these morons every day.

Considering that in Alberta, pharmacies are obligated to give out Narcan/Naxolone kits free of charge, no questions asked, it's incredibly difficult.

The people who know better and are willingly partaking in fentanyl are the ones getting the kits and ending up a major toll on our healthcare system... Only to return later having overdosed, usually for the 5th or 6th time. Most fentanyl users can't get the narcan into themselves fast enough.

The ones who don't know better and don't know what they're getting into are the ones that end up dead.
 

Jarnhamar

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LunchMeat said:
Considering that in Alberta, pharmacies are obligated to give out Narcan/Naxolone kits free of charge, no questions asked, it's incredibly difficult.
Isn't this just enabling people to use more drugs?
I bet those kits aren't cheap.
 

medicineman

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Jarnhamar said:
Isn't this just enabling people to use more drugs?
I bet those kits aren't cheap.

Social Darwinism isn't in the Liberal lexicon...

MM
 

mariomike

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He's not dead. Let's break out the Narcan...  :)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXJ8c0rWJsk
 

medicineman

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mariomike said:
He's not dead. Let's break out the Narcan...  :)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXJ8c0rWJsk

That scene was even funnier when described in the novel  :nod:

MM
 

Colin Parkinson

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and this is from 2013, I bet the numbers of OD are much higher now.


https://mises.org/blog/dea-releases-new-drug-overdose-death-figures-guns-safer-prescription-drugs

 

mariomike

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The Blog says accidental gun fatalities and homicides. I wonder if that includes gun suicides? We were sent into a lot of those.

Auto fatalities are down,
https://army.ca/forums/threads/100194.0
https://army.ca/forums/threads/121479.0

In Toronto, pedestrian fatalities have increased dramatically.

Across America now, a needle in the hand of an addict is more lethal than a gun in the hand of a criminal.
https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/nation/2016/12/10/when-needle-more-deadly-than-gun/KXb5EV6Tt3aP3uCgQlJtsM/story.html
 
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