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Mountain Warfare - Medical Officer

306FL306

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Greetings

I have been told that Medical Officers can apply for Airborne training but being accepted into the course is never guaranteed because there may not be enough spots.

I ask:

1) Does anyone know if Medical Officers can take the Mountain Warfare Training course?

2) Do you active duty and former mermbers see value in having MDs who have been through the training?

I thank you in advance for your input.

Cheers!
 

winds_13

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306FL306,

While it is theoretically possible for a Medical Officer to complete the Basic Parachutist or Mountain Warfare course, it is very unlikely.

As a doctor, of which the CAF is constantly short of, you will primarily be employed providing medical care, in a clinic. Sending a doctor away for several weeks at a time to complete courses on how to move around the battlefield, whether it be out of an airplane or climbing mountains, is irrelevant to your line of work and, frankly, a waste of taxpayer money. In general, the military does not pay a doctor's salary to train someone as a combat soldier. It is more likely that the CAF will pay for a Medical Officer to  become a surgeon than it is to go on the Mountain Warfare course.
 

daftandbarmy

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306FL306 said:
Greetings

I have been told that Medical Officers can apply for Airborne training but being accepted into the course is never guaranteed because there may not be enough spots.

I ask:

1) Does anyone know if Medical Officers can take the Mountain Warfare Training course?

2) Do you active duty and former mermbers see value in having MDs who have been through the training?

I thank you in advance for your input.

Cheers!

There was a time when a fit, keen doctor who can pass selection would be snapped up like gold dust by various 'special' organizations. Make sure you are clear about your goals, and go for it, would be my advice.

 

ModlrMike

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Good advice upstream, but it's important to recognize that these courses would be offered on a "train to needs" perspective. Gone are the days of relatively easy access.
 

306FL306

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I thoroughly appreciate your responses and invite more people to comment. I do not have thin skin and can take your comments just fine.

The reason why I ask is because I was an Infantry Officer-In-Training in another country's army and took Mountain Warfare and Jungle Warfare training in that army. Moreover, in that army, Medical Officers are allowed to take Paratrooper, Mountain, Jungle and other biome-specific training because the training itself will allow the Medical Officer to do a better job at treating those troops who are in those biomes and who operate in specific environments. Paratrooper (Airborne) training alllows Medical Officers to be dropped in remote areas or disaster-stricken areas very quickly, even before helicopters are cleared to land in those areas, which does happen in the country I'm from.

I have to say I did not understand the comment: "There was a time when a fit, keen doctor who can pass selection would be snapped up like gold dust by various 'special' organizations. Make sure you are clear about your goals, and go for it, would be my advice" and if you could clarify that, I would highly appreciate it.

Lastly, I want to mention that I think it is my OBLIGATION to be fit and ready to deliver care wherever necessary. Deployment is a reality and it could be "right around the corner" for anyone in the reg forces.
 

tomahawk6

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The US Army has jump slots for medical personnel. Less so for other types of training. Priority would go to combat arms. If a medical officer want go on course and an opening occur then a slot might be offered if said person was local and would meet medical standards. I know back in 72 when I went to airborne school all of us were given a physical at the hospital. I even heard of a doctor completing Ranger school a rarity in itself.
 

medicineman

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My MO at a non-airborne unit managed to get his jump wings, but that was back in the 90's when we still had The Airborne Regt - there would have been a slot there had he wanted it after someone moved on.  Mountain Warfare Basic was usually run at a unit level when I attended the training - the Advanced Course went to people who were going to be instructors in a battalion or instructor trainers at CABC/CPC/ALWS or whatever the frig it's called these days.  I'm sure if you talked with your career manager and CANSOF medical recruiters regarding wanting to go that route, you'd be snapped up.  Otherwise, you end up waiting in line with everyone else. 

Depending on needs and where you're posted as an MO, you'll likely have to attend at least a Basic Aviation and Diving Medicine course +/- the Flight Surgeon and/or Advanced Diving MO courses and possibly the Submarine Medicine course.  There used to be a tropical medicine course, but IIRC, that's been sidelined for a number of years. 

MM
 

PhilB

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I am currently in the MMTP program and am prior service infantry, followed by CANSOF. I also have several of the courses you are inquiring about (from my prior service).

I would say that there is little need (in how MO’s are currently employed within the CAF) for these courses.

As others have said, it is possible to be loaded on these courses generally as a “good go”, but I would not see it being the norm, given the lack of requirement.

A medics role is “forward care”, while a physician (in most cases) is employed in a continuing/advanced care setting, in a better resourced location.

Happy to answer any follow up questions via PM.
 
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