• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Mental Health Issues From Freedom Convoy? -split from Freedom Convoy protests

Good2Golf

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
7,916
Points
1,360
Oh come on...really??

Sorry, but "phantom honking" is freakin' hilarious.
Although I do hear phantom honking from the Truck Booster in Candy Crush, even when I’m not playing…
B81BBC20-7CDD-4AE5-BC6C-70C2448D52E2.jpg
 

Good2Golf

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
7,916
Points
1,360
Sorry but thought this site of all places would be better at not minimizing mental health however minimal it might seem to be or is.
Perhaps the guy living 3km away from the protest site could post a PERSEC-redacted copy of his physician’s note diagnosing him with PTSD to make the case for his MH issues to legitimize his claim that otherwise seems spurious to some of us here. It’s a free country and we’re entitled to judge, no?
 

Remius

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
3,406
Points
1,090
That was uncalled for. I have a number of friends who suffer from PTSD, TBI's and other associated traumas. To equate truck horns to the circumstances that they faced is beneath you (or so I thought.)

Took a time out.

1. I apologize for having called you out like that. It was uncalled for.

2. I never minimise mental health regardless of its source or severity. For a bunch of reasons I’m not getting into. I’ve seen it happen too often. And not just in the CAF.

Sometimes what seems trivial to some is bigger to others. I’ve learned that over time.

If any of you are mental health professionals I’ll defer to your expertise on this. I am not. But I will give this the benefit of the doubt as I do for anything related to mental health.
 

Good2Golf

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
7,916
Points
1,360
Fair enough, Remius. I cannot help looking at things through my own lens, a similar one to Weinie. Having lost friends to the ultimate darkness of PTSD, I don’t take the issue lightly, but that doesn’t mean I have to fawn over everyone who uses/claims the PTSD (or OSI) label.

$0.02

G2G

Edit: though if someone uses the term OSI (vice PTSD), that defaults me info taking their word first and judging later.
 

Furniture

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1,031
Points
1,110
Perhaps the guy living 3km away from the protest site could post a PERSEC-redacted copy of his physician’s note diagnosing him with PTSD to make the case for his MH issues to legitimize his claim that otherwise seems spurious to some of us here. It’s a free country and we’re entitled to judge, no?
I live 3km from Parliament Hill and never heard a sound outside of the normal sirens, horns, and drunk/high people yelling at one another.

Maybe I'm being a bit pessimistic, but that person sounds an awful lot like someone trying to be "part" of the event for the sake of having a story to tell, and maybe get some cash.
 

Happy Guy

Member
Reaction score
182
Points
580
That was uncalled for. I have a number of friends who suffer from PTSD, TBI's and other associated traumas. To equate truck horns to the circumstances that they faced is beneath you (or so I thought.)
Mental health issues is a serious problem. Given all the training that we (CAF, Police, Emergency Services) have received regarding mental health, suicide prevention, sexual harassment, I find it somewhat disheartening to see some people trivialize mental health symptoms, however to the people suffering it is a real serious issue.

Full disclosure: After my return from ops I sought help from a mental health specialist. The doctor literally saved my life. I spent two years in therapy and til this day I regularly go in for a "tune up." I was deeply ashamed of myself when I went to the Montfort mental health section for my weekly appts. It didn't help that "strong" people in leadership positions were categorizing people like me as weak and useless. Today I am not afraid to tell me people that a mental health specialist helped me recover. I am significantly more mentally resilient now and I certainly would not call myself "weak".

This phantom honking is a real mental health problem to some people and it shouldn't be trivialized.
 

Furniture

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1,031
Points
1,110
Mental health issues is a serious problem. Given all the training that we (CAF, Police, Emergency Services) have received regarding mental health, suicide prevention, sexual harassment, I find it somewhat disheartening to see some people trivialize mental health symptoms, however to the people suffering it is a real serious issue.

Full disclosure: After my return from ops I sought help from a mental health specialist. The doctor literally saved my life. I spent two years in therapy and til this day I regularly go in for a "tune up." I was deeply ashamed of myself when I went to the Montfort mental health section for my weekly appts. It didn't help that "strong" people in leadership positions were categorizing people like me as weak and useless. Today I am not afraid to tell me people that a mental health specialist helped me recover. I am significantly more mentally resilient now and I certainly would not call myself "weak".

This phantom honking is a real mental health problem to some people and it shouldn't be trivialized.

One can both care about mental health, and point out things that are being dramatized. We are doing a far larger disservice to mental health awareness, and acceptance by treating all mental health concerns as being equal.

There is a difference of scale that needs to be applied to injuries, we don't treat a broken finger the same way we treat a broken femur. We also don't apply the same level of sympathy, and concern for all injuries.

People who need health care should seek health care, but crying to the national news because of the mental health equivalent of a kitchen accident will likely draw ridicule. A news story about a chef cutting off part of their finger would also draw about the same level of mild ridicule...
 

lenaitch

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1,048
Points
1,040
One can both care about mental health, and point out things that are being dramatized. We are doing a far larger disservice to mental health awareness, and acceptance by treating all mental health concerns as being equal.

There is a difference of scale that needs to be applied to injuries, we don't treat a broken finger the same way we treat a broken femur. We also don't apply the same level of sympathy, and concern for all injuries.

People who need health care should seek health care, but crying to the national news because of the mental health equivalent of a kitchen accident will likely draw ridicule. A news story about a chef cutting off part of their finger would also draw about the same level of mild ridicule...
I agree, and have thought about this for a while. I would certainly never question how an individual responds to a situation, and am no mental health professional, but it strikes me that PTSD is too broad, or applied to broadly. The same label gets applied to seeing a troopmate turned into mist and having your cat die or breaking up with you boyfriend. It's tossed out by defence counsel during sentencing submissions.

It seems everybody needs counselling now. Perhaps the medical community needs to come up with another category so that those who have experienced high-level 'no person should see' type trauma isn't degraded.
 

Happy Guy

Member
Reaction score
182
Points
580
I am not an expert in Mental Health. I don't think that you can compare mental health treatment the same as a physical injury treatment. While on a bridging exercise years ago, I broke two fingers on my right hand and it was extremely painful, but it healed and it doesn't bother me anymore. I was also stabbed with a bayonet but the wound has healed and there is no physical pain. My mental health issues are a different matter, years later I still have problems. One of my co-workers, served in Bosnia he was not physically wounded, yet he still has recurrent nightmares and wakes up with the bed sheets wet with sweat. He has gone through two marriages. The husband of the friend of my wife served with the CAR while in Somalia. He was not physically wounded but he suffered from PTSD. Both had to leave the CAF because of mental health issues.

For a broken femur, splint, pain killers, rest and then rehab - standard method. Broken finger, splint, pain killers, rest and rehab if necessary.

For mental health the treatment will depend on the patient and there will be a varying degree of experimentation to find out what works best, although they probably is a standard method of approaching the problem. For me, it took it months of talking with the mental health professional before they could find out what treatment I was responding to. Another personal suffering from the same mental health problem as I do might: have suffered the injury from a total different experience than from me; and receive a different treatment

Yes, on the surface, a reaction to a honking horn may not be seem as serious as to someone who suffers from PTSD as a result of combat in an operational war zone. If you consider the Ottawa environment with: the loud continous noise (honking horns); lack of sleep; loss of control; and the feeling of helplessness extended over a period of three weeks, some people can develop a mental health problem. The point is any mental health injury is painful to the sufferer. no matter how it is caused.
 

Good2Golf

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
7,916
Points
1,360
Happy Guy, with respect, I think you over simplify physical injury and don’t acknowledge that there can be linked MH with a physical injury, which is a very real phenomenon.

To your MH-specific points, i don’t disagree generally, but my critique earlier (and I don’t see myself ending such judgement) was of the individual who lived 3km away from the city centre. I personally do not see that to be what I associate with a valid PTSD situation. Right downtown? Absolutely! My spidey-sense always is set on edge when someone actually uses the acronym PTSD in describing their situation, vice describing the effect: traumatic, debilitating, fell scared/powerless, etc. if someone said they had PTSD from the strobe flash in their rear view mirror every time they blew through a red light camera, that doesn’t mean they have what many of us would judge to be PTSD. That said, there is a spectrum of understanding and acceptance and if you support a “say you have PTSD, then you have PTSD” position, that’s entirely your right to do so. I’d be interested to hear what kind of medical help “3km away guy” will be able to revive to help deal with his PTSD?
 

Happy Guy

Member
Reaction score
182
Points
580
Happy Guy, with respect, I think you over simplify physical injury and don’t acknowledge that there can be linked MH with a physical injury, which is a very real phenomenon.

To your MH-specific points, i don’t disagree generally, but my critique earlier (and I don’t see myself ending such judgement) was of the individual who lived 3km away from the city centre. I personally do not see that to be what I associate with a valid PTSD situation. Right downtown? Absolutely! My spidey-sense always is set on edge when someone actually uses the acronym PTSD in describing their situation, vice describing the effect: traumatic, debilitating, fell scared/powerless, etc. if someone said they had PTSD from the strobe flash in their rear view mirror every time they blew through a red light camera, that doesn’t mean they have what many of us would judge to be PTSD. That said, there is a spectrum of understanding and acceptance and if you support a “say you have PTSD, then you have PTSD” position, that’s entirely your right to do so. I’d be interested to hear what kind of medical help “3km away guy” will be able to revive to help deal with his PTSD?
MH can be directly linked to a physical injury - total agree.

As for PTSD diagnosis I leave that to mental health professionals. Someone can say that they suffer from PTSD but in reality it maybe something else. When I came back, I was warned by a good friend of mine, a nurse, not to disclosed what I experienced to my wife because she could suffer from a negative secondary effect because of me. The point that I was trying to make, but obviously failed, was that some people did not need to be directly exposed to a traumatic experience to suffer a mental health injury.

Cheers
 
Top