• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Marks / Grades: School / GED or PLAR [MERGED]

Xylric

Member
Reaction score
3
Points
230
I think I'm in the odd situation where my supplementary education is far more applicable than my actual degree. We'll see what they say as things progress - I passed the CFAT, and am scheduled for medical in a few weeks.
 

Roger123

Member
Reaction score
0
Points
160
Xylric said:
Well, I was originally looking at a Pilot role, but when they suggested that I look into Naval Warfare, it was something which seemed far more suitable. My background in business is experiential (though I do have a diploma from Sheridan College for Marketing), with my degree being in something else (History & Anthropology of Religion, in essence).
I may be understanding you incorrectly, but the impression I get is that you are trying to match your educational background/ experience to an officer position that is likely to benefit most from what you have to offer. Why not look through the different officer trades and find something that interests you and see if you meet the requirements.
 

da1root

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Reaction score
21
Points
380
When individuals are unsure about the various occupations in the CAF and whether they would be a good fit with their education I normally suggest going into a Recruiting Centre to speak with the staff there; this gives a better interaction and ability for you to ask follow up questions vice seeking advice online.
 

Loachman

Former Army Pilot in Drag
Staff member
Directing Staff
Reaction score
452
Points
980
Roger123's and Buck_HRA's advice is the best, and the latter is a Recruiter of solid repute.

What do you want to do?

Reading through older (but, in most cases, still active) threads will give you more insight.
 

Xylric

Member
Reaction score
3
Points
230
Oh, I'm *very* sure about what I'm after - my great-great grandfather was a shipwright who came to Nova Scotia after the shipyards he worked at in Scotland shut down in the late 19th century. When 1910 came around, he would've been one of the key factors in the construction of the first native ships of the Canadian Navy.

Becoming a Naval Warfare Officer would be a filial duty as a result, and one that I would proudly commit myself to (providing that I am deemed suitable, that is). My question was ultimately an academic one, because while I can see where my experience in business *could* be useful (in regards to nearly all administrative tasks), I'm simply unfamiliar with the differences that I'd need to adapt towards.
 

Loachman

Former Army Pilot in Drag
Staff member
Directing Staff
Reaction score
452
Points
980
That you will learn during your training, and for a long time afterwards.

It sounds like you have made a decision.

Congratulations.
 

Marchog

Member
Reaction score
0
Points
210
Xylric said:
Oh, I'm *very* sure about what I'm after - my great-great grandfather was a shipwright who came to Nova Scotia after the shipyards he worked at in Scotland shut down in the late 19th century. When 1910 came around, he would've been one of the key factors in the construction of the first native ships of the Canadian Navy.

Becoming a Naval Warfare Officer would be a filial duty as a result, and one that I would proudly commit myself to (providing that I am deemed suitable, that is). My question was ultimately an academic one, because while I can see where my experience in business *could* be useful (in regards to nearly all administrative tasks), I'm simply unfamiliar with the differences that I'd need to adapt towards.

I suppose I can relate, since I accidentally picked the same trade as an ancestor of mine, without even knowing. Blood thicker than water, etc etc.

Good luck!
 

Piece of Cake

Jr. Member
Reaction score
0
Points
110
Xylric said:
I run a start-up company in which a plurality of staff have some significant neurological variations. For both legal and moral reasons, I can't really go into detail, but it has left me to wonder. Given that my administrative and managerial experience has involved ensuring that the staffers are able to put their skills to use in ways that complement each others' strengths while neutralizing weaknesses, giving full account to any specifics (with the understanding that I can't help people who aren't fully honest with me about their specific challenges and risks), how different would this be from being an officer in the Canadian Forces?

Given that the military is structurally more inherently hierarchical, it seems to me that the best managerial practices of the civilian world may prove insufficient. It's the difference between a group of sled dogs and a pack of wolves, in my estimation. One works together effortlessly in regards to a specific individual task, and the other is much more similar to a family group, working as a symbiotic whole in *all* regards.

I wrote the CFAT earlier this month at least partly out of the premise that I have a demonstrated ability to forge a stable team out of individuals with skills and backgrounds which do not blend naturally (given that the company has been in operation longer than five years). I have my suspicions that it's rather arrogant for me to believe that this skill alone is sufficient justification to seek a military career, but I'm glad to make the attempt.

Hi Xylric,

Your questions are great and touch on several issues that were addressed in fall 2016 Auditor General's report.

5.67 The Canadian Armed Forces’ website is a key source of information for job seekers about the Canadian Armed Forces as an employer, as well as about its various occupations. We found that the website did not provide potential applicants with a tool to identify the occupations they were best suited or qualified for. The information was organized by occupation, but there was no way for job seekers to view job descriptions or educational requirements without clicking through many pages. As well, many occupations lacked civilian-equivalent titles. These issues may make it difficult for applicants who are unfamiliar with the Canadian Armed Forces to find the information they need.
Source: http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/internet/English/parl_oag_201611_05_e_41834.html#p51
 

Pusser

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1
Points
430
The occupation most likely to want or take advantage of your business background would be Logistics.  However, in order to be enrolled as a Logistics Officer, you need to have formal education in the field (e.g. B Comm. CA, MBA, etc).  Experience can perhaps be considered, but it would have to be analyzed and I wouldn't be optimistic about that.  I my view, the Logistics Branch has taken a stupidly narrow view of life in recent years and although I have been a Logistics Officer for over 25 years, if I were applying to the Branch today, I would not even be considered with my BA in History (back when I entered, it was considered an "acceptable" albeit not "preferred" degree, but now it is not even "acceptable).

Having said that, for many officer occupations (Pilot and Naval Warfare Officer included), any degree will do.  As you progress in rank and assume more responsibility, you will become more involved in the "business" part of your unit and a background in business may be beneficial (but a lack of it won't necessarily hinder you either, as long as you can learn).
 

Xylric

Member
Reaction score
3
Points
230
An interesting thought came to mind.

In the eyes of the military, what would be the core difference between a bachelor's degree (A B.Comm, for example) obtained at a college (such as Sheridan or Centennial), and a degree in the same subject obtained at a university?
 

da1root

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Reaction score
21
Points
380
Pusser said:
if I were applying to the Branch today, I would not even be considered with my BA in History (back when I entered, it was considered an "acceptable" albeit not "preferred" degree, but now it is not even "acceptable).

You'd be "acceptable" again; February 2017 the entry standard for LogO was updated (again) to include "any baccalaureate and and or Master's Degree" is acceptable for LogO again... :)
 

da1root

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Reaction score
21
Points
380
Xylric said:
An interesting thought came to mind.

In the eyes of the military, what would be the core difference between a bachelor's degree (A B.Comm, for example) obtained at a college (such as Sheridan or Centennial), and a degree in the same subject obtained at a university?

Some Canadian Colleges do offer Baccalaureate degree's; those degree's are given the same recognition as a degree obtained from a Canadian University.  The CAF is not responsible for determining whether an Institutions training meets Academic Requirements; there are other Legislative Bodies that determine that.

The only thing the CAF is concerned with is whether you have the appropriate diploma and/or degree to enter a specific occupation.
 

dapaterson

Army.ca Relic
Subscriber
Donor
Reaction score
7,104
Points
1,090
The senior serving logistician in the CAF was equally unsuited for Logistics; I believe he had a hand in sorting that out.
 

Pusser

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1
Points
430
dapaterson said:
The senior serving logistician in the CAF was equally unsuited for Logistics; I believe he had a hand in sorting that out.

This is good to hear.  As I understand it, a previous LBI was the one who drove the change and it got through, despite the fact that there were a fair number of very senior logisticians who were as equally unsuitable as me (including a rear-admiral).
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
11,363
Points
1,160
And here are 5 reasons you should want to be 'in the Army now':

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/5-reasons-why-should-want-army-now-richard-eaton/

And a few reasons to fugedaboutit:

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/5-reasons-why-you-dont-want-army-now-richard-eaton/
 

BagPiperGuy

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
10
Good day all

If this is in the wrong forum topic I apologize in advance (This is my first post on the website) I recently applied to the Canadian Forces but I was not eligible for the trade I wished to train in because I have not completed high-school completely (I need less then 10 Credits). Now I was offered other trades, some of which have peeked my interested, but this whole posses has made me think about completing my high school for good. What I am here asking is if I select another trade if once my training is complete and I am stationed if there is a fair amount of free time when off shift/duty to work on my post secondary education, either online or day/night school.

My original first choice of a trade in the CF was Firefighting or Medical Technician, But the other trades I am looking at are (In Order) Combat Engineer, Communication and Information System Specialist, Aviation System Technician or Armored Crewman.

I am just looking for some members who could share there experiences and if they feel it is possible to be a full time member and work on post secondary education, it has sort of become a personal goal of mine to finish it. Or if you feel I should finish it before and then complete my application.

I appreciate any help or advice and thank you for your time!

J.
 

PuckChaser

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Mentor
Reaction score
1,733
Points
1,060
You'll have time to complete your high school, it will even be encouraged by your chain of command. Don't expect time right away as you'll be busy on BMQ and your initial trade training.
 

Blahbla

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
10
I'm having some MAJOR doubts if my educational background will pass the requirements. I currently do not have enough credits to have completed grade 10. I do, however, have a college diploma for a 2 year program. Anyone know how that will work for me? I have submitted my CAF application and have my appointment for the aptitude test. Will my college diploma be considered? That is the highest level of education I have completed.
 

da1root

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Reaction score
21
Points
380
Unless there's a PSO hiding on here somewhere that question won't be answered.
Recruiters aren't "qualified" to give that advice and it'll be passed off to a Personnel Selections Officer (PSO).  Each CFRC has a PSO (called a UPSO); your file will be passed to them to make the determination as they'll have to review your college degree to make that determination.

Sorry I couldn't give you a more concrete answer.
 
Top