• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Loss of Norwegian frigate Helge Ingstad

Colin Parkinson

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
3,170
Points
1,060
Removal of torpedo's from the wreck by divers

https://www.facebook.com/blueyerobotics/videos/vb.452616248259819/1319271408214772/?type=2&theater


some extra footage and pics https://www.blueyerobotics.com/page/complex-underwater-operations
 

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Relic
Reaction score
9,402
Points
1,160
Colin P said:
Removal of torpedo's from the wreck by divers

https://www.facebook.com/blueyerobotics/videos/vb.452616248259819/1319271408214772/?type=2&theater


some extra footage and pics https://www.blueyerobotics.com/page/complex-underwater-operations

Not enough money in the world....  :eek:
 

FJAG

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
3,996
Points
1,040
I'm not a sailor but that's a sad thing to watch. Amazing what a few moments of bad decisions can bring about.

:not-again:
 

Colin Parkinson

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
3,170
Points
1,060
daftandbarmy said:
Not enough money in the world....  :eek:

for commercial divers this is a nice job, shallow water, clear, clean, no bodies and your not swimming in a sewage pond.
 

Colin Parkinson

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
3,170
Points
1,060
https://navaltoday.com/2019/02/26/operation-to-lift-sunken-norwegian-frigate-gets-underway/

HNoMS Helge Ingstad is expected to be onboard the submersible barge “Boa barge 33” by Thursday or Friday, the navy said. The entire operation is expected to be completed by the end of the weekend.

The schedule of the delicate operation could still be affected by the weather, the navy noted.

Live feed of salvage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iynqr4FaJK4&feature=share
 

Cloud Cover

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
30
Points
530
"Operation planing will be based on a great amount of data and extensive calculation, the navy said." Same as the harbour approach.  :whistle:
 

Uzlu

Full Member
Reaction score
98
Points
380
Salvors Begin Assessment of Wrecked Norwegian Frigate

The floating shearlegs barges Rambiz and Gulliver have successfully raised and carried the sunken frigate Helge Ingstad back to port at Hanøytangen, Norway, bringing a multi-month effort to recover the ship to a close.

On Thursday, salvage teams from the Royal Norwegian Navy boarded the Ingstad to conduct an initial damage assessment and to dewater flooded compartments. Upon her arrival, the Ingstad was too heavy to be hoisted onto a semi-submersible barge for transport, and pumping off more water will allow the salvage effort to proceed.

A Navy team suited up with oxygen tanks and dry suits to conduct an examination of the frigate's interior, and they wore helmet cameras to document their findings. Among other clues gathered on the video, investigators hope to preserve evidence of which watertight doors were closed and which were left open at the time of the sinking, which will help them to model the flooding that took the Ingstad down.

Some 300 people - including over 100 members of the Ingstad's crew - are on hand to help with dewatering and initial salvage efforts. Anita Eide, 26, was among those on board the Ingstad on the night of the collision, and Eide was one of the first people to board the wreck after her arrival in port. "The vessel is as dirty inside as it is on the outside," she told NRK.

In advance of the raising, Norway's defense department prepared a precise plan to remove and preserve the most sensitive equipment on board the Ingstad. Saltwater is more corrosive when in contact with air, so the crew will remove about 1,400 pieces of gear from the wreck and submerge it in freshwater for the best possible chance of preservation. Some of these items - especially bridge electronics - will be transferred to Norway's Accident Investigation Board (AIBN) for use in its inquiry.

During the lifting operation, salvors found that Ingstad had several hundred tons of buoyancy. "This may indicate air pockets," said Anders Penna, the leader of the operation for salvage contractor BOA. Any compartments that remained watertight could contain undamaged equipment.

The OEM suppliers for the Ingstad's systems will assist with the effort to save components. Though Ingstad has been underwater for months, Forsvaret believes there may be value in assessing the state of her turbines and diesel engines, among other valuable machinery.

Norway's defense department (Forsvaret) has not yet reached a conclusion about the possibility of repairing the Ingstad and returning her to service, but it has begun exploring options to shore up Norway's naval capabilities in her absence. Ingstad is one of only five main surface combatants in the Royal Norwegian Navy, and her loss represents a considerable reduction in capability. Among other options, Forsvaret is considering extending the life of a class of small missile boats which are currently slated for decommissioning. It also has the option of adding one more unit onto an existing contract for new submarines.
https://www.maritime-executive.com/article/salvors-begin-assessment-of-wrecked-norwegian-frigate
 

JMCanada

Member
Reaction score
49
Points
380
A few more pics.

https://i.imgur.com/Y39l5pi.jpg
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D0zlqcDXcAYp9wO.jpg:large
https://i.ibb.co/LgjmG7j/choque.jpg
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D0zl58iWsAAhzrK.jpg:large

In this video (the 2nd), surprisingly, most of the doors remained open.

https://www.bt.no/nyheter/i/l16O0A/Hele-fregatten-er-kommet-over-vannet#&gid=1&pid=1?jwsource=cl

 

Uzlu

Full Member
Reaction score
98
Points
380
Forlorn frigate may sail once again

The once-proud Norwegian frigate KNM Helge Ingstad is finally back at home port in Bergen, severely gashed and rusting after four months underwater. Raising the sunken frigate, which collided with an oil tanker in early November, has already cost taxpayers dearly and now government officials want to repair it so it can sail again.

Naval officers were already claiming on Monday that the frigate could be refloated within six weeks. “The goal is get KNM Helge Ingstad down on the water and afloat on its own,” Flag Commander Thomas Wedervang told reporters on Monday, just after the frigate arrived back at the Haakonsvern naval base Sunday night.

Crews have already been on board the vessel since it was raised, then chained to heavy-lift barges and ultimately loaded onto a barge that towed it back to Bergen. The salvage operation itself proceeded relatively quickly, following numerous delays since the frigate sank off coastal islands northwest of Bergen after its collision with a tanker that its crew mistook for part of the oil terminal at Sture. Once the frigate was raised, it took just over a week to bring it to home port.

“Now our focus is on salvaging as much as possible” off the frigate, Wedervang said. Naval crews have already removed “much of value” from the wreckage, he said, including 1,400 unspecified “components” from a list of 2,500 on board. The last of the frigate’s weapons and ammunition will be removed, then the hull and the rest of the frigate’s condition will be evaluated.

Defense Minister Frank Bakke-Jensen told Norwegian Broadcasting Monday evening that the government wants to make the frigate operable again. “The work to clarify how KNM Helge Ingstad can be repaired starts now,” Bakke-Jensen wrote in an email to NRK. “The government wants to re-establish the frigate’s operative capability.”

He said the salvage operation so far has already cost “at least NOK 640 million” (USD 75 million). If the badly damaged vessel can’t be repaired, or if that option becomes too expensive, the minister said other alternatives will be evaluated, from replacing the frigate with a new one or investing instead in smaller vessels, submarines or maritime patrol flights.

The government will put forth a new long-term plan for the defense department in 2020. The work on that plan will likely determine the ultimate fate of the frigate.

There’s been little talk about the fate of the crew members on the bridge of the frigate since they collided in the early morning hours of November 8 with the fully laden tanker sailing from the Sture terminal. The tanker had a pilot on board and an escort vessel, and its crew frantically tried to get the Helge Ingstad’s crew to slow down and change course to avoid the collision, to no avail.

Both Naval officials and Bakke-Jensen himself have seemed keen to gloss over blame for the collision, opting instead to praise how well the vessel’s evacuation went and how well the salvage operation went this past week, despite its delayed start. The frigate’s captain has also defended his crew, while a preliminary report from Norway’s state accident investigation board merely claimed that a string of events led to the collision, while other maritime experts suggest the frigate’s crew was at fault. Bakke-Jensen and the Norwegian Navy seem most intent now on simply moving on, and learning how to deal with the loss of 20 percent of the fleet and a huge blow to Norway’s defense capacity.
https://www.newsinenglish.no/2019/03/04/forlorn-frigate-may-sail-once-again/
 

Colin Parkinson

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
3,170
Points
1,060
My guess is that the hull is twisted and if brought back into service, will be a money pit to keep working and many gremlins from hidden corrosion in the wiring.
 

Stoker

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
283
Points
880
Colin P said:
My guess is that the hull is twisted and if brought back into service, will be a money pit to keep working and many gremlins from hidden corrosion in the wiring.

My guess if they did get it back in the water it would be a pride thing, not a save money thing. Every bit of wiring, insulation, fire proofing, equipment is compromised from SW. We're talking much more than a 6 week job.
 

Navy_Pete

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
1,239
Points
1,040
Chief Engineer said:
My guess if they did get it back in the water it would be a pride thing, not a save money thing. Every bit of wiring, insulation, fire proofing, equipment is compromised from SW. We're talking much more than a 6 week job.

It's probably both faster and cheaper to simply build a new one; it's something like 5-10 times the labour to install things once the ship built (compared to doing it at the module stage), and they'd also have to do a damage assessment, come up with a repair plan, and execute.

They are being weirdly relaxed about finding fault; not a fan of scapegoating, but you can't let people slide for making mistakes that put the lives of the entire crew at risk.
 

Colin Parkinson

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
3,170
Points
1,060
Likely as the rot goes far higher than the Captain and a indepth exam will cause all sorts of problems.
 

Cloud Cover

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
30
Points
530
Colin P said:
Likely as the rot goes far higher than the Captain and a indepth exam will cause all sorts of problems.
Which Navy are you talking about? They have a very small org, no??
 

Colin Parkinson

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
3,170
Points
1,060
Well it could apply to several......

Rumour has it that various initiatives were being pushed that took precedence over good seamanship. That sort of stuff comes from senior management, both political and military.
 

Czech_pivo

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
1,504
Points
1,140
Colin P said:
Well it could apply to several......

Rumour has it that various initiatives were being pushed that took precedence over good seamanship. That sort of stuff comes from senior management, both political and military.

To your point - have a read of this article.  I cannot comment on the validity of the information.

https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2018/11/22/gender-politics-and-sinking-of-knm-helge-ingstad.html
 

FJAG

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
3,996
Points
1,040
Czech_pivo said:
To your point - have a read of this article.  I cannot comment on the validity of the information.

https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2018/11/22/gender-politics-and-sinking-of-knm-helge-ingstad.html

I'm not sure that the article has any validity or even a point to it.

Basically it rambles on about the poor seamanship displayed (which I presume correct because of the result) and the Norwegian Forces publishing articles wherein which they express their pride in the extent of the integration of women in their Navy.

There is nothing in the article which indicates that there was a lowering of standards or any "woman" issues which caused the accident. Just the usual blathering that in the past there had been some:

debate [that] had centred around the number of women in the Navy, the extent to which they are quoted in requirements compared to men, and what effect it had on the professional “culture” of the Armed Forces.

Completely useless article that adds nothing to our knowledge of the real issues.

:cheers:
 
Top