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HMCS Preserver smashes into dock - 4 Nov 2011

Snakedoc

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Probably a little less socially acceptable when the ship has just undergone a shiny new $45 Million refit in the RCN's eyes... and in today's digital age, information spreads much quicker and has wider distribution
 

Sailorwest

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Pat in Halifax said:
Reminder; This is a "Naval Ships and Vessels" thread, not a "Holy F***, another sailor screwed the pooch" thread.
I recall days when jetty bashing was a driving lesson-it was socially acceptable-like drinking and driving.

For those NOT in the know, tugs regularly take Naval vessels through the harbour. As someone else mentioned, flashing a boiler for a hot move is like going to sea-IRO and HAL are the same-Full 'at sea watch' required on board for a hot move.

It is kind of a colloquial MARS term. The intent is to learn how to drive the ship not to actually "bash" the jetty. The idea should be to stop just short of that. Nobody ever likes to be the subject of the converstion in the Wardroom that starts with "I had no idea what he was thinking about when..."
 

Colin Parkinson

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As I always say, a ferry captain puts his career on the line 4 times a day. docking a large ship is never easy and stuff can just go wrong. Mind you watching my friend who is a pilot, dock a 66,000DWT freighter without tugs and not even feeling a bump as she comes alongside was impressive.
 

Stoker

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Here's the recent collision

photo.jpg
 

OldSolduer

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Jim Seggie said:
Ouch. That's gonna leave a mark.

OK enough of the funnies for  now......so tell me, Navy dudes....what is the IA if you think your ship is going to run into a dock or an immovable object?

Now I am infantry...short words, small sentences, type s l o w l y!

Thanks!! ;)
 

Towards_the_gap

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I will hazard a guess...


1. Move as far away from the steering wheel thingy as possible, making yourself look as inconspicuous as possible.

2. Hold onto something.
 

OldSolduer

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GAP said:

I suppose....

Towards_the_gap said:
I will hazard a guess...


1. Move as far away from the steering wheel thingy as possible, making yourself look as inconspicuous as possible.

2. Hold onto something.

:rofl:


Now seriously......I shoulda known!!
 

midget-boyd91

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Jim Seggie said:
OK enough of the funnies for  now......so tell me, Navy dudes....what is the IA if you think your ship is going to run into a dock or an immovable object?

Now I am infantry...short words, small sentences, type s l o w l y!

Thanks!! ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWoPdZ986oo

 

Occam

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Jim Seggie said:
OK enough of the funnies for  now......so tell me, Navy dudes....what is the IA if you think your ship is going to run into a dock or an immovable object?

Now I am infantry...short words, small sentences, type s l o w l y!

Thanks!! ;)

"Brace for collision" - hold on to anything you can find, and then get ready for the "Emergency Stations, Emergency Stations, close all red openings" pipe after the crunch.  That orders all watertight doors and hatches below the waterline to be closed.
 

Ex-Dragoon

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In addition to what Occam has posted. Ops types look away from their screens in case they shatter.
 

OldSolduer

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Kinda like a car crash - just a bit bigger and maybe a bit more warning.....?

 

Oldgateboatdriver

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Actually, Jim, just like a car crash, but in extreme slow motion: It takes minutes to happen in front of your eyes but there is f*** all you can do about it.

Occam also forgot, that from basic on, all seaman are taught the proper way of leaning on the front of their feet and bending their knees when brace for collision is piped. That is because the energy of any collision is dissipated in great part as a shock wave running through the steel deck. They "buckle" so fast that if not in the right position, ankles, knees or leg bones can be shattered. Not a pretty sight.

Also, for those not familiar with Halifax harbour, you can see from the picture that the event occurred in the area of the harbour known as the Halifax Narrow. As the name implies, it's a nasty and tight spot, with a bend in the middle of it that is riddled with weird currents and undertows at various stages of tide. Its even tighter for an AOR and shit can happen there very fast - I remember my passages there with PROTECTEUR and it was very stressful. Imagine being the Snowbird plane in the middle of the formation but not having the luxury of ejection seat if anything goes wrong.
 

Occam

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Oldgateboatdriver said:
Occam also forgot, that from basic on, all seaman are taught the proper way of leaning on the front of their feet and bending their knees when brace for collision is piped. That is because the energy of any collision is dissipated in great part as a shock wave running through the steel deck. They "buckle" so fast that if not in the right position, ankles, knees or leg bones can be shattered. Not a pretty sight.

I remembered that as "Brace for shock" drills for incoming missiles/torpedoes, but couldn't for the life of me remember if it was appropriate for collisions.  There you go.  ;)
 
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jollyjacktar

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The pipe, (announcement over the intercom)  is "Brace for Shock".  They will also include what the threat is, and on what side of the ship (if they can).  Port or Stbd.  After the crunch, they will should pipe, "Ship's company, unbrace". Which should  then be followed by the action alarm bong bong sounding three times, "Emergency Stations, Emergency Stations (with further info/instructions as the situation requires)  such as Fire/Fire/Fire, fire in (location), Zone (location), or Flood/Flood/Flood etc.  Section base teams close up.  (There are variations to what could be piped dependent upon the situation.  At sea or in harbour.  Working day or after hours.  A confirmed emergency or a sensor indication of fire/flood/smoke etc.  Get's complicated for you landlubbers...  ;))

What should happen after everyone is told to unbrace, that the Damage Control Teams for each assigned Section Base should adopt action dress and proceed to their respective base.  There should also be a concurrent rapid survey conducted of your immediate surrounding area to if possible to assess any indication of fire/flood/casualty prior to heading out to your assigned station.  Hopefully by the 6 minute mark or better (desired) all the Section Bases are closed up (manned and ready), rapid surveys for damage have been made and any reports of damage sent up the chain, and command/HQ1 is directing the appropriate orders and actions to deal with the situation. 

Of course Jim, it's like the Army in your drills to respond to say an ambush, you know what needs to be done and you do it as it becomes second nature.  To close up for Action Stations etc the mark is 6 min or better.  I have seen a close up for a real emergency flying stations, middle of the night in 3 1/2 minutes.  A good crew, well drilled, is a beautiful thing to see.
 

SeaKingTacco

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I have been part of a middle of the night engine room fire where we closed up to emergency stations in just over 2 minutes.  Mind you, we had an engine room fire the previous night, so we had had a bit of practice.  ;)
 

chrisf

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jollyjacktar said:
Of course Jim, it's like the Army in your drills to respond to say an ambush, you know what needs to be done and you do it as it becomes second nature.  To close up for Action Stations etc the mark is 6 min or better.  I have seen a close up for a real emergency flying stations, middle of the night in 3 1/2 minutes.  A good crew, well drilled, is a beautiful thing to see.

I've always assumed, or at least hoped, drills on a naval ship would be done on a "surprise" basis...

Somthing that's consistently bothered me working on a ship civi side is we typically hear around lunch time that there's going to be a boat and fire drill, or marsec drill or whatever, to be held conveniently after supper...

In fairness, some of the logic on holding it after supper is to avoid messing too much with sleeping watch-keepers, which is fine... but we could still do it on a "surprise" basis... most of the time, everyone who's not on watch is sitting in their cabin, feet up, life vest on the bunk, waiting for the bells...

I've always been curious what would happen if a fire were to occur around, say, 0200...
 
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