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Freedom Convoy protests [Split from All things 2019-nCoV]

KevinB

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Wasn't there about 200 bombs go off and kidnapped politicians during FLQ?
Deputy Premier of Quebec (Pierre Laporte) was kidnapped and later killed, and a British Diplomat was kidnapped (James Cross).
The FLQ had stolen a quantity of explosives and weapons from the CAF - and at least two EID's where detonated - one injuring a CAF EOD Soldier who was disarming it.

Honestly I think 99.99% for the blame for the FLQ movement belongs at the feet of Charles De Gualle with his idiot speech in 1967 - I encourage people to piss on his grave.
 

Happy Guy

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Deputy Premier of Quebec (Pierre Laporte) was kidnapped and later killed, and a British Diplomat was kidnapped (James Cross).
The FLQ had stolen a quantity of explosives and weapons from the CAF - and at least two EID's where detonated - one injuring a CAF EOD Soldier who was disarming it.

Honestly I think 99.99% for the blame for the FLQ movement belongs at the feet of Charles De Gualle with his idiot speech in 1967 - I encourage people to piss on his grave.
Charles DeGaulle was a hypocrite. He had a profound influence in Québec independence movement and yet he severely cracked down on Breton nationalism.
 

Blackadder1916

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Depending on which source you use, 'about 200' bombings and 6-8 killed between 1963 and 1970.

While the FLQ bombing campaign (though "campaign" suggests a level of sophisticated organization and coordination - actually rare in the FLQ) occurred over several years, there was an uptick in the bombings in 1969 extending into 1970 with the major one being at the Montreal Stock Exchange in February 1969. Montreal at the time was almost the wild, wild west (or should that be the wild, wild east) of lawlessness, with bank robberies and gangland murders (the good old proper Mafia kind) mixed into the demonstrations, riots and other mayhem coming from political and social dissatisfaction. Throw in good old corruption along with an underpaid police force who went on strike and you have the makings of why the army was called out "in aid of the civil power" in October 1969 - a year before the October Crisis.

 

Remius

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Deputy Premier of Quebec (Pierre Laporte) was kidnapped and later killed, and a British Diplomat was kidnapped (James Cross).
The FLQ had stolen a quantity of explosives and weapons from the CAF - and at least two EID's where detonated - one injuring a CAF EOD Soldier who was disarming it.

Honestly I think 99.99% for the blame for the FLQ movement belongs at the feet of Charles De Gualle with his idiot speech in 1967 - I encourage people to piss on his grave.
The FLQ was around well before De Gaule’s speech. I think the speech just emboldened them. The 60s and 70s saw a lot of left wing terrorism. Seemed like a world wide struggle (in europe in particular) with very left wing and socialist movements. The FLQ certainly was inspired from that and from the birth of Revolution Tranquille.
 

Happy Guy

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I've had enough of this protest. This has pushed me to my limits of tolerance. I'm going to buy a lottery ticket and win!
 

Edward Campbell

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The FLQ was around well before De Gaule’s speech. I think the speech just emboldened them. The 60s and 70s saw a lot of left wing terrorism. Seemed like a world wide struggle (in europe in particular) with very left wing and socialist movements. The FLQ certainly was inspired from that and from the birth of Revolution Tranquille.
Some people say it began in 1960 with the notion of Maîtres Chez Nous, but I would argue that the roots of the modern separatist movement can be found circa 1940 when Mackenzie-King, while allowing Canada to play a HUGE role in prosecuting the Second World War, declined any leadership roles at all. He was, probably correctly, terrified of a repeat of the 1917 conscription crisis, and even though he got one it was, relatively minor and Québec remained only quietly anti-allied.

The real roots of separatism (Québec nationalism) can be found in 1774: The Quebec Act.
 

Retired AF Guy

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The FLQ was around well before De Gaule’s speech. I think the speech just emboldened them. The 60s and 70s saw a lot of left wing terrorism. Seemed like a world wide struggle (in europe in particular) with very left wing and socialist movements. The FLQ certainly was inspired from that and from the birth of Revolution Tranquille.
D'Arcy Jenishs book "The Making of the October Crisis: Canada's Long Nightmare of terrorism at the hand of the FLQ" gives a good concise history of the events leading up to October 1970 and the aftermath. Includes lots of incidents that took place that I was totally unaware of.
 

Jarnhamar

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The divisive tactics Liberal MP Joel Lightbound spoke about could very well usher in more violent confrontations.

Left wing vs right wing.
Cities vs rural.
Gun owners vs non-gun owners.
Pro life vs pro choice.
Religion vs science.
and so on.

In fairness the CPC may have partook in this behavior while they were in power as well (I don't recall it myself), but the currently government is absolutely pushing to divide Canadians along all these lines and more.

Whats it leave? A portion of citizens who feel increasingly ostracized. Verbally and publicly insulted. Called uncanadian. Made to feel their beliefs and views are "unacceptable".

Everyone in the CAF knows what happens when you treat people like children; they act like it.
People are getting accused of being on the fringe, so what do they do? Buy a sticker and wear the accusation/insult like a badge.

The invoking of the EA plays perfectly into how scared of the fringe/right wing the government has told people they should be.

This what Canada moving forward - for everyone looks like.
 

Czech_pivo

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The FLQ was around well before De Gaule’s speech. I think the speech just emboldened them. The 60s and 70s saw a lot of left wing terrorism. Seemed like a world wide struggle (in europe in particular) with very left wing and socialist movements. The FLQ certainly was inspired from that and from the birth of Revolution Tranquille.
Mayer-Bader gang or Red Army Fraction anyone?
 

Haggis

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While the FLQ bombing campaign (though "campaign" suggests a level of sophisticated organization and coordination - actually rare in the FLQ) occurred over several years, there was an uptick in the bombings in 1969 extending into 1970 with the major one being at the Montreal Stock Exchange in February 1969. Montreal at the time was almost the wild, wild west (or should that be the wild, wild east) of lawlessness, with bank robberies and gangland murders (the good old proper Mafia kind) mixed into the demonstrations, riots and other mayhem coming from political and social dissatisfaction. Throw in good old corruption along with an underpaid police force who went on strike and you have the makings of why the army was called out "in aid of the civil power" in October 1969 - a year before the October Crisis.

I was living in Montréal during the police strike and FLQ Crisis (the professionalism exhibited by the soldiers who patrolled and protected VPs in my neighbourhood in October 1970 was a strong influence on me joining the CAF). Indeed there were a lot of bombing and other violence, but it was not generally terrorists. There was a Mob war underway concurrently. Many, many car bombs on the major highways in Montréal. I recall hearing a large boom ahead of us on the highway and passing a still flaming car in the collector lane of the eastbound 20. Montréal experienced similar violence during the more recent biker wars.
 

FJAG

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I was living in Montréal during the police strike and FLQ Crisis (the professionalism exhibited by the soldiers who patrolled and protected VPs in my neighbourhood in October 1970 was a strong influence on me joining the CAF)
Thank you. And, you're welcome.

😁
 

Haggis

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Thank you. And, you're welcome.

😁
At least you didn't quote the passage about the Mob hit.🤣

On a related note, three of my "connected" junior high classmates from the 1970's went on to do hard time as adults.
 

Blackadder1916

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At least you didn't quote the passage about the Mob hit.🤣


On a related note, three of my "connected" junior high classmates from the 1970's went on to do hard time as adults.

Only one of my junior high classmates was later convicted of murder. . . that I know of.
 
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