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Fallen Comrades (retired members)

xo31@711ret

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New Larry well back in the early & mid 80's in Duke's Coy 1RCR London. Larry was a great guy. We (single back then) worked hard & partied hardier. You will not be forgotten bud, rest in peace my friend. Pro Patria  :salute:  :cdn:  :salute:
 

a78jumper

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Very sorry to hear of Laurence's passing. I was a first year at RMC during he fourth and he had a reputation as being a taskmaster, but I know his heart was in the right place. We crossed paths in Petawawa ca 1983 and again over a beer about 15 years ago in the Army Ottawa Mess shortly after he had retired. Never changed. Godspeed Sir.
 

a78jumper

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Not sure if anyone knew John...retired RCR Major, ex 3 Cdo and CABC, and ex OC of the Sky Hawks...http://globalnews.ca/news/536752/skydiver-dies-in-accident-near-stony-plain/

Blue skies Jumper.
 

Ciskman

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This is terribly sad to hear. He was quite involved in the SAR parachute world.  Great guy. My thoughts are with him and his loved ones.

 

captloadie

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My one and only jump was a tandem with John years ago. He will be missed by all. RIP.
 

Edward Campbell

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I  don't think I ever crossed paths with John, but I knew who he was and how active he was in the airborne community. This photo - released by The Regiment* - is, I suppose, how he wants to be remembered.

_____
* Here is the notice from The Regimental net:

Yesterday, Regimental Headquarters received tragic news of the untimely loss of a member of our Regimental family. Major John Scott (Ret'd) died Saturday night, 04 May 2013, near Stony Plain, Alberta, as
the result of a civilian free fall parachuting accident. He was 49 years of age and was living in Edmonton.

Major Scott had an extensive background with both The Royal Canadian Regiment and Airborne forces dating from 1984-2005. Within the Regiment John Scott will be especially remembered for serving with 3 RCR and, later, 1 RCR. He completed Infantry Officer Training in 1984 and was posted to 3 RCR at Winnipeg, qualifying Basic Para in November 1984. John Scott was posted to 3 Commando, Canadian Airborne Regiment, at Petawawa in 1987.  He went on to serve with the Canadian Airborne Centre (CABC) at Edmonton until 1992. Major Scott was posted to 1 RCR in Petawawa in 1992,  serving as 2IC of first Echo Company and then Delta Company. In 1998 he was back with the Airborne again, serving at the Canadian Parachute Centre (CPC) in Trenton until 2004. Major Scott was also a member of the Sky Hawks
Military Parachute Display Team. He concluded his career in the CF, serving with the Calgary Highlanders from 2004-2005.

(I would like to thank Major DL Berry, Lieutenant-Colonel SB Luckhurst, Lieutenant-Colonel PA Lockhart, Colonel CJJ Mialkowski, and Colonel JP Davis for their assistance in putting together the details of Major
Scott's military service (please note that some of the dates given are approximations).)

Following his retirement from the CF, Major Scott retained very close ties with The RCR and the military parachuting community. He was an ongoing trainer with CFPT. John Scott's death has been keenly and
especially  felt at CFLAWC. This morning at a unit parade in Trenton, Lieutenant-Colonel Paul Lockhart, the Commanding Officer, informed all ranks of CFLAWC of this grievous news.

His sudden and tragic loss has resonated deeply with soldiers and officers of John Scott's generation. Since yesterday I have received many heartfelt e-mails from shocked and saddened Royals. The reaction of
Lieutenant-Colonel Marty Lipcsey, as expressed to the CO of CFLAWC, Lieutenant-Colonel Paul Lockhart, was typical. "I suspect you have already heard of the tragic death of John Scott over the weekend in a
parachute accident near Edmonton.  He was well know in the RCR and in the skydiving community.  He will be surely missed but remembered as a
great soldier and leader that loved to jump.  My sincerest condolences."

Major Scott was known for his great spirit of adventure. He was an expert freefall parachutist with over 9,000 parachute descents to his credit. Many Royals recall shared adventures and happy experiences with
him, from climbing Monte Bianco, cruising the highways on Harley-Davidsons, or simply sharing a good time at his former Petawawa home on Doran Road. John Scott was a larger than life figure who will be
greatly missed, but fondly remembered. Many Royals will also recall his brother, Terry Scott, who also served with 1 RCR and 3 Commando in the 1980s. All of our thought and prayers go out to the bereaved family and
friends of John Scott at this time. As I learn of further details concerning memorial or funeral services I will be sure to pass these on.

Please see below for pictures of John Scott and an Edmonton news story about the tragic accident.

Pro Patria
 

a78jumper

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Yup that pretty well sums up John in more than a few words. I served with him in the Airborne Regiment late 80s and then at CABC 89-92 where he was 2i/c PTC then Ops O. We also crossed paths when I was the Team Manager of the CISM Parachute Team that competed in Zagreb in 1999...it was mounted out of CPC in Trenton and henceforth that unit became the centre of sport parachuting excellence,something previous CO's had been loath to touch so perhaps John had a hand in that decision too. We were on the same military freefall course in the fall of 1989, and he took it from there.....Godspeed on newfound wings John. I am sure that given his zest for life his funeral/memorial is going to be an EVENT! Not the type that would want people sitting moping and all sad.
 

Edward Campbell

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LCol Herb Clouthier, The RCR, has passed away:

From The Regimental Adjutant:
__________
I was recently alerted to the death of a very distinguished Royal Canadian, a veteran of the Korean War, and a true Regimental hero. Lieutenant-Colonel Herbert George Cloutier, MC, CD passed away on 20 April 2013 at Ottawa. He was  serving as a subaltern with 1st Battalion The Royal Canadian Regiment from at least 1950 (see attached photo of Lieutenant Herb Cloutier, taken at Petawawa in August 1950). However, based on the decorations and jump wings on his chest, he clearly had much longer service in the Army. Herb Cloutier deployed to Korea with 1 RCR in March 1952. While the Battalion was located at embattled Hill 355 (Kowang-San), a new rifle company, "E" or "Easy" Company was raised on 06 September 1952. Captain Cloutier was named the Officer Commanding this company. He would subsequently play a significant role in the epic Battle of Kowang-San, 22-24 October 1952. He led his Company with courage and coolness and was an inspiring presence throughout. Immediately following the desperate fighting in the area defended by "B" Company, "Capt H.G. Cloutier of E Company organized two groups to probe and determine the enemy strength on B company's front..." (Stevens, G.R., "The Royal Canadian Regiment: Volume Two, 1933-1966," London Printing & Lithographic Co., Limited, London, Ontario, 1962. p. 253). He was subsequently cited for gallantry in action and awarded the Military Cross. The citation reads as follows.

    AWARD of THE MILITARY CROSS

    To ZP 2810 Captain Herbert George CLOUTIER, CD
    1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment

    "ON 23 OCTOBER, 1952, “E” COMPANY OF 1ST BATTALION, THE ROYAL CANADIAN REGIMENT, COMMANDED BY CAPTAIN CLOUTIER, WAS SUBJECTED TO AN INTENSE ENEMY ARTILLERY AND MORTAR BOMBARDMENT
      WHICH PRECEDED AN ASSAULT ON THE COMPANY ON THE RIGHT FLANK. THE BOMBARDMENT CONTINUED ON “E” COMPANY THOUGH LIFTING FROM THE COMPANY UNDER ATTACK. “E” COMPANY HAD BEEN SUBJECTED
      TO HEAVY SHELLING FOR A PERIOD OF FOUR DAYS, WITH SHATTERING EFFECT ON THE DEFENCES AND THE MEN IN THEM. THE COMPANY AREA WAS SERIOUSLY AND EXTENSIVELY DAMAGED IN THE BOMBARDMENT ON
      23 OCTOBER, AND MOVEMENT OF ANY KIND WAS EXTREMELY HAZARDOUS. IN MANY PLACES DEFENSIVE COVER HAD BEEN COMPLETELY DEMOLISHED. ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO THE COMPANY UNDER ASSAULT WERE
      SEVERED. ALTHOUGH INTENSE MORTARING CONTINUED, CAPTAIN CLOUTIER PLACED HIMSELF IN A POSITION FROM WHICH HE REPORTED PROGRESS OF THE BATTLE TO HIS COMMANDING OFFICER. FOR SOME TIME
      HE WAS THE ONLY SOURCE OF VITAL INFORMATION. IN SPITE OF THE DEMORALIZING EFFECT OF FOUR DAYS HEAVY SHELLING, CULMINATING IN AN INTENSE BOMBARDMENT, CAPTAIN CLOUTIER WAS ABLE TO
      ORGANIZE TWO GROUPS FROM HIS COMPANY TO PROBE THE AREA WHICH HAD BEEN OVERRUN BY THE ENEMY. THIS ACTION, AND THE INFORMATION OBTAINED THEREFROM, WAS DIRECTLY RESPONSIBLE FOR THE
      SUCCESS OF THE COUNTER-ATTACK WHICH RESTORED THE SITUATION. CAPTAIN CLOUTIER’S COOLNESS, STEADINESS AND DETERMINATION WAS AN INSPIRATION TO THE MEN OF HIS COMPANY WHO STOOD FAST
      DURING THE EXTREME HEAVY ENEMY FIRE BEFORE AND DURING THE ATTACK. THE RETENTION OF HIS COMPANY POSITION WAS MOST IMPORTANT TO THE SUCCESS OF THE COUNTER-ATTACK. THERE IS NO DOUBT
    THAT THIS OFFICER’S INITIATIVE AND DETERMINATION ENABLED THE SITUATION TO BE RESTORED IN A RELATIVELY SHORT PERIOD WITH A MINIMUM OF CASUALTIES."

In April 1953 Captain Cloutier returned from Korea to Canada with 1 RCR. He was subsequently posted to 2 RCR and served with that Battalion at Wolseley Barracks at London, Ontario in the late 1950s. Major H.G. Cloutier, MC, CD is again mentioned in Regimental History in connection with ceremonial events involving 2 RCR in 1959. Major Cloutier was one of 12 Guard Commanders on 02 July 1959 at Wolseley Barracks during a Trooping of the Colours by all three battalions of the Regiment, including 3rd Battalion The Royal Canadian Regiment(London and Oxford Fusiliers). On this occasion, HRH Prince Philip presented both 1 RCR and 3 RCR new Colours. It should be noted that Herb Cloutier also had a brother, Captain Earl Cloutier, who served in The RCR and now lives in Kingston, Ontario.
 

Old Sweat

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I missed spotting before that the P in his service number indicates he was a member of the permanent force before the Second World War.
 

Good2Golf

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Jumped him a few times from 10K...an amazing guy.  RIP, John!  :salute:

Regards
G2G
 

Edward Campbell

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MWO (Ret'd) Al Cadieux, late The RCR:

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/ottawacitizen/obituary.aspx?n=albert-cadieux&pid=164676175#fbLoggedOut
CADIEUX, MWO Albert CD MMM

Passed away peacefully on May 4, 2013 at the age of 86. Loving husband of Yvonne for 66 years. Father of Barry, Todd (Kristine) and Stephen (Anita). Doting grandfather of Isabelle, Sebastian, Noah and Elizabeth from Denmark and Mia, Sacha from Kanata. He will be also missed by many nieces, nephews and friends. Predeceased by his brother Robert.

Albert served 35 years in Canada, Japan and Paris, France.

Friends and Family are invited to visit at Beechwood, Cemetery and Funeral Services, 280 Beechwood Avenue (east of Vanier Parkway) on Thursday, May 9, 2013 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. and Friday from 10 a.m. followed by a Funeral service in the Sacred Space at 11 a.m. Interment in the National Military Cemetery. In memory of Albert, donations to the Heart and Stroke and/or the High Horizons Care of MacKay United Church and/or CNIB would be appreciated. The family welcomes you to join them for a reception following the interment in the Borden and Fleming Suites. Special thanks to all the Doctors and staff of the ICU and the 4th floor of the Montfort Hospital for all the wonderful care and support. Tributes may be sent via Lifetimes at www.beechwoodcemetery.com

741254_20130507.jpg
 

Edward Campbell

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Maj (Ret'd) Peter McClure, Signals


McCLURE, Peter

It is with great sadness to announce the sudden passing of Peter on Thursday, May 2, 2013 at the Queensway Carleton Hospital at the age of 70 years. Beloved husband of Linda and cherished father of Robert (Meaghan) and Sharon. He is predeceased by his father Cameron and survived by his mother Jean and siblings Donna (Dave), Win (Dwain) and Roy (Liz). Peter will be dearly missed by his uncle Geoff (Jean) and his aunt Myrtle and all his family. Family and friends may pay their respects at the Bilberry Creek Baptist Church, 480 Charlemagne Blvd., Orleans, ON. on Thursday May 9, 2013 after 10 a.m. A Celebration of Life will follow at 11 a.m. In memoriam donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Bilberry Creek Baptist Church are greatly appreciated. www.kellyfh.ca

741204_20130507.jpg

 

a78jumper

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John Scott's family would like to inform you of a viewing to be held for family and friends. The viewing will be held tomorrow, Wednesday, May 8 at Serenity Funeral Services at 128 Queen Street in Spruce Grove, AB from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM.

Eden North will be hosting a memorial in the very near future and will send out the details as soon as possible.
 

Edward Campbell

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Peter Worthington, one-time soldier (PPCLI), occasional (failed) politician and journalist has died. His obituary is here.

300_Peter_W_army.jpg
 
peter-worthington.jpg
 

Old Sweat

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Quite a life. He, of course, was the son of Major General FF Worthington. I believe his middle name was Vickers, which came about because his father was commanding the PPCLI machine gun platoon in Winnipeg when he was born.

                                                    - 30 -

 

Edward Campbell

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I disagreed with Peter Worthington on almost every single strategic issue on which he opined, but he lived, indeed, "quite a life."

Here, reproduced under the Fair Dealing provisions of the Copyright Act from the Daily Beast, is another obituary, this time written by his son-in-law David Frum:

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/05/13/peter-worthington-1927-2013.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter
Peter Worthington, 1927-2013

by David Frum

May 13, 2013

The wide-angle film of the scene in the basement of the Dallas police station on November 24, 1963, captures on the far left of the camera an unusually handsome man leaning against the station wall. Suddenly shots ring out: Jack Ruby has fired upon Lee Harvey Oswald. And the camera shows that man at far left abruptly snapping to attention and running toward the shots.

That man was my father-in-law, Peter Worthington, and running toward the shots was his characteristic response to danger of every kind. Over his amazing career, he served first in World War II (gaining accreditation, in his phrase, as the youngest and arguably least competent flight lieutenant in the whole Canadian navy) and then for three years in Korea. He became Canada's best known war correspondent, covering conflicts up and down the length of Africa, in the high Himalayas on the Indo-China frontier, in the Middle East, and Southeast Asia.

1368438908896.cached.jpg

Peter Worthington, with Canadian Forces in Afghanistan.
Source: the Daily Beast


He launched his own newspaper in 1971, the Toronto Sun, the last profitable daily ever started in North America. He was the only Canadian ever prosecuted under the country's Official Secrets Act - not for betraying secrets, but for embarrassing the government of the day by documenting its own disregard of Soviet espionage activities inside Canada. He ran twice for Parliament in the early 1980s, and although he lost, his campaigns set in motion the train of events that brought down the Conservative Party's ineffectual leader Joe Clark and opened the way for Brian Mulroney to win the smashing Conservative victory of 1984. He continued his adventures till late life, traveling with Canadian forces in Afghanistan in his late seventies and publishing his interviews with Canada's most notorious serial killer, Clifford Olson, only last year.

A gifted athlete and a shrewd businessman, Peter Worthington excelled at everything he did. He seemed beyond ordinary human weakness: He suffered a heart attack thirty years ago and was saved by a bypass operation. He filed a series of columns for the Sun detailing his operation, and within a very few weeks afterward, celebrated his recovery by climbing China's Mount Gonga.

Yet time catches up with even the most indestructible men. Peter had been weakening for some time, and on Thursday, May 2 he suffered an abrupt health crisis. He was taken to Toronto General Hospital where the doctors who had held him together for three decades confessed they could do no more. Over the next week, he entertained his three children and six grandchildren with his famous gallows humor. A week later, he said his last goodbyes, commanded "no tears," and lost consciousness.

He slept peacefully until the middle of the night of May 12-13, watched over the whole time by his wife of 44 years, Yvonne Worthington. She sat beside him in his hospital room, usually smiling, sometimes crying, sometimes kissing the hair that was now white but still as thick as it was in the days when the man underneath interviewed Elizabeth Taylor and the Dalai Lama. Pete called his marvelous memoir of his amazing life, Looking for Trouble. Yet what he found at the end was the profound peace of the life well lived, and of love gained because so generously given. He told me in our last talk that in all the hazards he had met in his life, he had never been afraid. He had sometimes felt nerves, he said, but not fear. From the trenches of Korea to the bullet-riddled alleys of Algiers to Biafra to the heart surgeons' gurneys, he was always impelled by curiosity to see what came next. Now he knows.

Soon the fuller and longer tributes will come. But Peter, never one to trust others to get the story, has scooped us all by writing his own obituary, which will appear in tomorrow's Toronto Sun - one last byline for the man who won more National Newspaper Awards than any other writer in Canadian history.

And if there is a Heaven, Pete's already baffling the angelic editors of the local press by producing copy faster than they can use it.

A memorial service will be held in Toronto in the next days. Details will be posted in this space, in my Twitter feed, and on a purpose-built Facebook page.

Looking for Trouble will shortly be re-released as an e-book. If journalism schools continue to exist in the 21st century, it ought to be the first book on every reading list. Those who loved Pete will miss him desperately, and cherish his memory as an exemplar of integrity, courage, and grace under fire.

David Frum is a contributing editor at Newsweek and The Daily Beast and a CNN contributor.
 

Fishbone Jones

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While many disagreed with him sometimes, you couldn't deny he spoke his mind and suffered fools not at all.

:salute:
 

Edward Campbell

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Lt. Harold G. "Shorty" Fairhead (Ret'd), 1 RCR

From The Regimental Adjutant:

Regimental Headquarters recently received the very sad news of the passing of one of our Regiment's Korean War Veterans. Lieutenant Harold George "Shorty" Fairhead (Ret'd) passed away on 19 April 2013 at Cowansville, Quebec. Born at Montreal on 23 April 1926, he was a resident of Knowlton, Quebec and was in his 87th year. Lieutenant Fairhead served with the 1st Battalion The Royal Canadian Regiment both before and during the Battalion's combat tour in Korea from March 1952 - April 1953. He also fought in the epic Battle of Kowang-San, at Hill 355, from 22-24 October 1952. While in Korea with 1 RCR he served in two different rifle companies. First with "D" ("Dog") Company, as Platoon Commander of 10 Platoon; and then with "C" (Charlie") Company, Platoon Commander of 7 Platoon. During the battle of Kowang-San, Lieutenant Fairhead was with 7 Platoon, "C" Company. He was wounded in action on two different occasions, quite severely during the latter incident. A distinguished Platoon Commander, Harold G. Fairhead was also Mentioned in Despatches for saving the lives of several of his men during a vicious, night-time close quarter battle with the enemy. Like so many of our Veterans, he was very reticent throughout his life about his own heroism.

Lieutenant Fairhead was first wounded in action on 13 June 1952. At this time the Battalion was occupying part of the Kansas Line, east of the Samichon River, that included Hill 355. It was a time of increased patrol activity against the Chinese. On the night of 13 June, Lieutenant Harold Fairhead was leading such a patrol, during which contact was made with the enemy. Fairhead's patrol suffered three casualties at this time, himself being one of the wounded (see, "The Royal Canadian Regiment, Volume Two, 1933-1966," by G.R. Stevens, London Printing & Lithographing Co., Limited, London, Ontario, 1967, page 247). On 13 January 1953 Lieutenant Fairhead was wounded again, under the most heroic of circumstances. On the night of 13 January 1953, he led a platoon-sized patrol out into No Man's Land, directly towards the enemy trenches. At this point, 1 RCR was located in an embattled area known as, "The Hook." After crawling stealthily for an intense period of two hours, Shorty Fairhead and his men closed in on the objective Chinese position. Despite their caution, the patrol was heard by enemy sentries who now primed and threw several grenades. One well thrown grenade landed in the midst of Lieutenant Fairhead and his men. Reacting without hesitation to protect his men, and with total disregard for his own safety, Shorty Fairhead rushed the live grenade and kicked it away from his soldiers. He was severely wounded when the grenade detonated. As well, ten other members of the patrol were wounded, but none fatally thanks to Shorty's selfless act (see "The Royal Canadian Regiment, Volume Two, 1933-1966," by G.R. Stevens, page 256). Lieutenant Harold Fairhead would be Mentioned in Despatches for his act of heroism. He was eventually medically evacuated to Japan and finally to Canada. Lieutenant Fairhead then underwent extensive and ongoing reconstructive surgery at the Royal Victoria ("Royal Vic") Hospital in Montreal.

As a young man, prior to his military service, Harold Fairchild had attended McGill University at Montreal. Naturally gifted, he became well known as a university athlete. Harold gained renown as a player for McGill University Redmen football team, from 1948-1950. The McGill Redmen (named after the red jersey they wore) was one of Canada's most historic football clubs, dating back to 1874. It speaks volumes about Harold Fairhead that at just this point in his life, with a bright future beckoning, he chose instead to serve his country on the battlefield. It is important to note that Harold Fairhead had already rallied to the defence of his country as a younger man. He had served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War.

Last year, Lieutenant Harold G. Fairhead (Ret'd) attended the 1 RCR Kowang San Day commemoration that took place on Friday, 19 October 2012 at Petawawa, Ontario. Mr. Fairhead and his wife, Eleanor, drove to Petawawa from their home in Knowlton, Quebec to be with his old Battalion on that memorable day. Upon arriving in Petawawa Shorty Fairhead soon reconnected with his old platoon, 7 Platoon, Charles Company, 1 RCR. It was impossible to say who was more pleased, Shorty himself or the young soldiers of 7 Platoon. For Lieutenant Harold Fairhead, aged 86 years, the years fell away and old memories were rekindled as he spent the better part of the day with 7 Platoon. Sixty years after Kowang-San, Shorty Fairhead was still very much a soldier's soldier. It was our great honour and pleasure in Regimental Headquarters to also meet and spend time with Mr. and Mrs. Fairhead. There was no doubt that Shorty was an exceptional character and had a terrific memory as he regaled us with anecdotes about his experiences in the Korean War. I do remember fondly one story in particular. It concerned an incident that occurred after one of the occasions when Lieutenant Fairhead had been wounded. He was being treated in an advanced American medical aid facility, relatively close to the front lines. To help his morale, the wounded Harold had been given a bottle of beer to drink by the American medical staff. Nearby was a Chinese POW who was also being treated for a wound. The captured Chinese soldier however, though wounded, was much more mobile than Shorty. Somehow, the intrepid and thirsty Chinese soldier was able to craftily steal the bottle of beer from Harold. Lieutenant Fairhead helplessly fumed and cursed while the Chinaman smacked his lips with the outmost contentment. Years later, Shorty Fairhead remembered this incident with equal parts humour and bemusement.

The following anecdote concerning Lieutenant Harold G. "Shorty" Fairhead was recently forwarded to me by his friend, Mr. Tom Rogers.

    "On 15 January 1953, six months before the war ended, Shorty and his platoon were involved in a firefight with the Communist Chinese forces. A live grenade landed in their midst. Without a moment's hesitation
    he placekicked the grenade, saved his men, but suffered serious wounds. Had Shorty not done so, all would have been blown to smithereens. He was Mentioned in Despatches (MID) for his spontaneous reaction to
    the grenade. Harold Fairhead was  evacuated to a military hospital in Japan and later returned home to the Royal Vic for reconstructive surgery.

    The night prior to one of his operations to remove shrapnel, Shorty received a visit in his hospital room from two of his former 'Redmen' teammates. Marv Meirowitz* and my brother John. Meirowitz, you may recall,
    later played several years with the Montreal Alouettes. Together the three of them consumed the better part of a bottle of Scotch. A couple of days later his buddies heard that Shorty's heart had stopped beating on
    the operating table! His caregivers weren't quite sure whether they had fouled up or that the Scotch had almost done him in. It was with more than some relief that his buddies later learned that the patient was still
    alive and more or less well."

          *Marvin "Marv" Meirowitz may have been every bit as much a character as Harold "Shorty" Fairhead himself. The American-born Marv Meirowitz also played for the McGill Redmen from 1948-1950.
            During the 1948 season he was ejected from half of the games he played in for on-field brawls; yet in 1949 was named the team's leading lineman. Marv Meirowitz played two seasons for the
            Montreal Alouettes of the CFL in 1952 and 1953.

Throughout his life Harold G. Fairhead remained loyal to The Royal Canadian Regiment and maintained close ties with the Regiment through The RCR Association till the end of his life. To me it is highly symbolic and moving that in the last year of his life, Lieutenant Harold "Shorty" Fairhead quite deliberately reconnected with his old Battalion on Kowang-San Day. He was a great Canadian and a great Royal and he will be missed. Please see below for Harold Fairhead's obituary that appeared in the Montreal Gazette. Also find attached pictures of Harold Fairhead and the crest of his beloved McGill Redmen's football team. In the b-w photograph from the Korean War, please note that Lieutenant Harold Fairhead is the officer closest to the camera and is in the process of marching away from Brigadier Rockingham.

Pro Patria



 
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