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Dress and Deportment

mariomike

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Colin P said:
I suspect more than a few members would be a bit shocked at the expectations that can await outside the military, particularly if you want to do something other than manual labour.

Particularly when your job involves going into homes. Likeability is 90% of the battle. Smile and a shoeshine.  :)

 

dimsum

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Colin P said:
I suspect more than a few members would be a bit shocked at the expectations that can await outside the military, particularly if you want to do something other than manual labour.

When I read articles about how veterans didn't get whatever job after the interview, how much of that was them not dressing up to standard for it in the first place.  Seeing the units I've been in do Civie Fridays is...interesting.  I guess some peoples' fashion sense really don't progress once they join the CAF.
 

mariomike

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Dimsum said:
When I read articles about how veterans didn't get whatever job after the interview, how much of that was them not dressing up to standard for it in the first place. 

And, try to find out if it is the same, or different, format as your CAF interview.

Mine was an oral board ( that's a panel interview ).

It was also a "stress" type interview. They really caught me off guard.  A very unpleasant experience compared to my CAF interview.
 

OldSolduer

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Dimsum said:
When I read articles about how veterans didn't get whatever job after the interview, how much of that was them not dressing up to standard for it in the first place.  Seeing the units I've been in do Civie Fridays is...interesting.  I guess some peoples' fashion sense really don't progress once they join the CAF.

I'm of the opinion "Civilian Fridays" should be banned outright. You're in the CAF, dress like you're in the CAF.

As for supporting the United Way the CAF should encourage those who want to contribute to go ahead, but not at the idea of paying to wear your civvies to work.
 

AKa

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Hamish Seggie said:
I'm of the opinion "Civilian Fridays" should be banned outright. You're in the CAF, dress like you're in the CAF.

As for supporting the United Way the CAF should encourage those who want to contribute to go ahead, but not at the idea of paying to wear your civvies to work.

I don't have a strong opinion either way, but while it's permissible, I'll take advantage of it to motivate myself to develop a professional civilian wardrobe.  And I like to think I set a good example for my more junior personnel.

But I do prefer the optics of wearing civilian dress on those sadly rare occasions where Friday lunch at the mess extends until later in the afternoon... 
 

stoker dave

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Colin P said:
I used to have to deal with some high end consulting firms, they clearly had a dress code and an expectation. I suspect much was unwritten but if you didn't play along you would very quickly get sidelined. I suspect more than a few members would be a bit shocked at the expectations that can await outside the military, particularly if you want to do something other than manual labour.

I work for a large engineering and construction company.  There is very much an unwritten dress code.  It kinda goes like this:

* Presidents and such:  suit or coat and tie at all times.
* Vice presidents, managers and senior technical people:  nice trousers and open neck shirt.  Even at construction sites. 
* Technical staff, middle engineers, technicians:  jeans and a nice shirt. 

The exception is any time you are meeting clients /customers (other than at a construction site) you generally move up one level.  At construction sites, jeans are ok for most but not the senior people. 

I will further add that compliance with construction/worker safety gear is INFLEXIBLE.  There is zero tolerance for anyone that does not wear AT ALL TIMES the correct PPE (boots, safety vest, hard hat, gloves, eye protection, hearing protection, etc. as specified) for whatever they are doing.  In general, my experience is that the 'safety culture' is much stronger in industry than at DND (but that is whole other topic). 
 

daftandbarmy

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Hamish Seggie said:
I'm of the opinion "Civilian Fridays" should be banned outright. You're in the CAF, dress like you're in the CAF.

This.

IMHO.... If you are at 'Army' work, you need to be dressed to do 'Army' things up to and including 'closing with and destroying the enemy'. When superior Officers/ NCMs try to give orders to their subordinates while wearing LuLu Lemon slacks and loafers, I observe a mental flex to the movie 'Office Space', with the commensurate level of seriousness and respect.

Social occasions? Totally different IMHO...
 

Remius

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Of the three organisations I was on long term class b with 2 did not allow Civy Fridays.  One did.  One was a very public job so no go and the other required operational dress at all times ie a lot of manual work.  the other that allowed it was a office type stuff. 
 

RocketRichard

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Speaking of dress and deportment. Does anyone in Calgary know of a local tailor that can change mess kit? Change shoulder straps, add ranks, adjust cuffs etc


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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CountDC said:
Longest I saw was a month long practice for the Queen's visit to Halifax in the mid 80's that was a changing of colours parade.  They practiced every day from early (8 or 9) until 2200h.

That's a lot of practice! For our colour presentation we practiced almost every Wednesday evening and most (3/4) weekends from September until November. I missed portions of it as I was on course at the time (in fact I had course the following day!).

There was also practice in April and May of the preceding training year, but I was deployed at that time.
 

Bzzliteyr

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RomeoJuliet said:
Speaking of dress and deportment. Does anyone in Calgary know of a local tailor that can change mess kit? Change shoulder straps, add ranks, adjust cuffs etc


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Andy the tailor? Andy's tailor?

Something like that I hear in the office.
 

OldSolduer

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CanadianTire said:
That's a lot of practice! For our colour presentation we practiced almost every Wednesday evening and most (3/4) weekends from September until November. I missed portions of it as I was on course at the time (in fact I had course the following day!).

There was also practice in April and May of the preceding training year, but I was deployed at that time.
Trooping The Colours of The Second Battalion Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry on 27 March 1976. We practiced daily for 4-5 hours per day.  Our Reviewing Officer was Lady Patricia Brabourne, The Colonel in Chief accompanied by her father, Lord Louis Mountbatten.
 

Fishbone Jones

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Why do we have threads, that are shorter than 11 pages, about lack of equipment, real problems of procurement or the CAF budget.

Perhaps the reason we're carrying on so, is that the agenda of the CDS, his buttons, his bows and his PR damage control escapades covering for his bosses, has conditioned us to where we're more concerned with beards than bullets and boots.
 

daftandbarmy

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Fishbone Jones said:
Why do we have threads, that are shorter than 11 pages, about lack of equipment, real problems of procurement or the CAF budget.

Perhaps the reason we're carrying on so, is that the agenda of the CDS, his buttons, his bows and his PR damage control escapades covering for his bosses, has conditioned us to where we're more concerned with beards than bullets and boots.

Proper dress, drill and deportment are the foundations of self-respect, and self-confidence, which breeds other - equally important - things in soldiers under stress in times of war... e.g.,

At Apeldoorn, Major Frank Lindley found himself in a room with about twenty other wounded Officer POWs. He says "We were all dirty and unshaven and in various stages of dress and undress. The door opened and in came RSM John Lord, also a POW. He was dressed in immaculate battledress, trousers creased, and he had an arm supported in a snow white sling. Without a word he turned his head slowly to look at each individual in turn and then said in his brisk voice "Gentlemen, I think you should all shave!" He then turned about, stamped his foot and marched out of the room. The effect was electric. The motley group of officers Infantry, Gunners, Engineers etc. stirred themselves and started to clean themselves up. It was an unforgettable experience". - quoted in To Revel in God's Sunshine; The story of the Army career of the late [Sandhurst] Academy Sergeant Major J.C. Lord, MVO, MBE, compiled by Richard Alford

http://regimentalrogue.com/quotes/quotes_ncos2.htm

 

TCM621

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daftandbarmy said:
Proper dress, drill and deportment are the foundations of self-respect, and self-confidence, which breeds other - equally important - things in soldiers under stress in times of war... e.g.,

At Apeldoorn, Major Frank Lindley found himself in a room with about twenty other wounded Officer POWs. He says "We were all dirty and unshaven and in various stages of dress and undress. The door opened and in came RSM John Lord, also a POW. He was dressed in immaculate battledress, trousers creased, and he had an arm supported in a snow white sling. Without a word he turned his head slowly to look at each individual in turn and then said in his brisk voice "Gentlemen, I think you should all shave!" He then turned about, stamped his foot and marched out of the room. The effect was electric. The motley group of officers Infantry, Gunners, Engineers etc. stirred themselves and started to clean themselves up. It was an unforgettable experience". - quoted in To Revel in God's Sunshine; The story of the Army career of the late [Sandhurst] Academy Sergeant Major J.C. Lord, MVO, MBE, compiled by Richard Alford

http://regimentalrogue.com/quotes/quotes_ncos2.htm

I have read similar things about POWs as well.
 

mariomike

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daftandbarmy said:
At Apeldoorn, Major Frank Lindley found himself in a room with about twenty other wounded Officer POWs. He says "We were all dirty and unshaven and in various stages of dress and undress. The door opened and in came RSM John Lord, also a POW. He was dressed in immaculate battledress, trousers creased, and he had an arm supported in a snow white sling. Without a word he turned his head slowly to look at each individual in turn and then said in his brisk voice "Gentlemen, I think you should all shave!"

Reminds me of the first scene of a movie I saw. An American soldier in a Japanese POW camp near the end of the war.

Getting his customary shave, manicure and shoeshine. He is wearing a long-sleeved uniform shirt. Only insignia is his unit patch and corporal chevrons. He looks sharp. His uniform is cleaned and pressed. He has 7 or 8 more. A high class wrist watch and cigarette lighter, along with an unlimited supply of cigarettes. Even has a Top Sergeant as a valet.

He looks like something out of a recruiting poster.

As you might guess, there is more to the story.
 

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cavalryman

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mariomike said:
Reminds me of the first scene of a movie I saw. An American soldier in a Japanese POW camp near the end of the war.

Getting his customary shave, manicure and shoeshine. He is wearing a long-sleeved uniform shirt. Only insignia is his unit patch and corporal chevrons. He looks sharp. His uniform is cleaned and pressed. He has 7 or 8 more. A high class wrist watch and cigarette lighter, along with an unlimited supply of cigarettes. Even has a Top Sergeant as a valet.

He looks like something out of a recruiting poster.

As you might guess, there is more to the story.

King Rat, based on the James Clavell novel.  Read the book, never saw the movie version, but your quick description immediately told me who that was...
 
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