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Do Canadian nursing officers carry guns like infantry soldiers?

brihard

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It wasn't necessary to post this twice.

In any case, nurses absolutely may carry a weapon while deployed- probably a sidearm (pistol).

We do have medics - medical technicians - trained for work out in the field as medics assigned to combat units, and they may serve as combatants as the tactical situation dictates. Nurses, however, typically stay 'inside the wire', and their weapons are carried for purposes of self defense. I've never heard of a nursing officer needing to use their weapon, but they typically aren't carrying them because they're serving in a nice place.

So take that for what it's worth.

 

Armymedic

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Actually the nursing officers do not carry them like infantry soldiers. They carry weapons much more relaxed, more like other support officers and not at all like combat arms soldiers.

nursingofficer said:
if not, who are medics that carry guns in Canadian Forces

what are they called?

Soldiers.

If you do not like the sarcasm by which I answer your questions, then perhaps you should rethink how and when you ask them, as you could be supervising those soldiers who are Med Techs in the near future.

 

brihard

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SFB said:
Actually the nursing officers do not carry them like infantry soldiers. They carry weapons much more relaxed, more like other support officers and not at all like combat arms soldiers.

Soldiers.

If you do not like the sarcasm by which I answer your questions, then perhaps you should rethink how and when you ask them, as you could be supervising those soldiers who are Med Techs in the near future.

Fair chance the poster isn't actually a 'nursing officer' yet, and is actually an aspirant who genuinely doesn't know.
 

gaspasser

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IIRC, under the Geneva Convention, Medical personal carry side arms for the defense of thier patients during the amelioration (read evacuation) (phew, I said it!) of said casualties. 

My :2c:
 

Neolithium

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BYT Driver said:
IIRC, under the Geneva Convention, Medical personal carry side arms for the defense of thier patients during the amelioration (read evacuation) (phew, I said it!) of said casualties. 

My :2c:

Quite correct, I was bored so I looked around for the specific information.  It's a nice thought of course, however insurgents can't spell Geneva Conventions, let alone follow them.

http://www.icrc.org/ihl.nsf/WebART/365-570026?OpenDocument

 

medicineman

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BYT Driver said:
IIRC, under the Geneva Convention, Medical personal carry side arms for the defense of thier patients during the amelioration (read evacuation) (phew, I said it!) of said casualties. 

My :2c:

I think you'll find that they may carry "small arms" for personal or patient protection...this includes things larger than sidearms.

MM
 

ModlrMike

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medicineman said:
I think you'll find that they may carry "small arms" for personal or patient protection...this includes things larger than sidearms.
MM

To amplify... effectively anything other than a crew served weapon.
 

Pusser

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ModlrMike said:
To amplify... effectively anything other than a crew served weapon.

Other than a lack of training, I don't think there's anything actually preventing medical personnel from using a crew served weapon, as long as it is in defence of themselves or their patients.
 

gaspasser

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Quite correct, you'd be amazed how quick some people can learn how to fire .50!

Back in the Gulf War (the first one!) The RCR's had to remove the .50s from the AVGP's (Um, predecessor to the LAV) because they were considered offensive weapons....
(My  :2c:  they're only offensive to the opposing force!!!)    :piper:
 

1feral1

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Summing up, a pic has a 1000 words.

Here is one of our Amb's.

Note the 12.7mm FN M2 QCB.

Taken Shoalwater Bay, Queensland, June 2007.
 

medic65726

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Attached photo of CF Nursing Officer in the Critial Care Ward of the old KAF Hospital, 2006.
Note holster on thigh.
 

tacmed2007

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really do you WANT an nurse shooting...lol jokes

and where sis you find that pic of the Amb??? thats not even canadian?? that looks American to me.

All hounesty the MEdics as a whole carry either the musket(C7) or the C8 and a side arm, Officers and such can have both if they want.
If you are dismounted then you my son are very much in the fight with the "boys" and that is where we try to bring up the training.
 

CombatDoc

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The only trade is the CF that do not carry weapon are....Padres.  All the rest, including all medical trades, carry weapons in an operational theatre.
 

NL_engineer

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CombatDoc said:
The only trade is the CF that do not carry weapon are....Padres.  All the rest, including all medical trades, carry weapons in an operational theatre.

I recall a Padre visiting a Leger on my tour carrying his C7 and 9mm, and the one from our fob walked around with his C7, 9mm or both.
 

Cansky

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NL_engineer said:
I recall a Padre visiting a Leger on my tour carrying his C7 and 9mm, and the one from our fob walked around with his C7, 9mm or both.

I doubt the individual was a padre.  Here is a link to the maple leaf article from Feb 10 clearly indicating that the padres don't carry weapons.
http://www.forces.gc.ca/site/commun/ml-fe/article-eng.asp?id=5903

And the recruiting website states as follows:
Only the chaplain can achieve this special trust because he or she has privileged access to all members, has no commanding authority, and is prohibited from bearing arms.http://www.forces.ca/en/job/chaplainofficer-128#info-1
 

Cansky

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And from the offical Chaplain Manual  http://www.cmp-cpm.forces.gc.ca/cfcb-bsafc/pub/doc/acm-maft-eng.pdf

30. For Canadian chaplains appropriate conduct has been clearly
defined by Branch policy. That this policy may differ from that of
other nations and forces is ultimately not relevant. The current Branch
Policy is clearly defined in 5111-0 (DPOCS 2), 16 Dec 97, which
states:
The Chaplain’s Manual
B-GL-346-001/FP-001
118
IAW well established and long standing custom, the
Chaplain General directs that Chaplains of the
Canadian Forces Chaplain Branch shall not bear
arms or carry personal weapons under any
circumstances…
(W)eapons training at BOTC, the
slinging of rifles as part of the Basic Parachute
Course and safety familiarization during land force
warrior training are the only occasions when
chaplains are permitted to handle weapons. The ban
on chaplains bearing arms also applies to crewserved
weapons of any type in any service
environment or on any weapon platform.
 
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