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DEO Health Care Admin Officer

SheRa011

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i agree with eastcoaster and nobbs...if you can't support another person's career aspirations, why not just keep the lack of support to yourself?  after all, i didn't weigh in on your career goals.  it's one thing to let on that you did not enjoy your career and why, but it's another ball game to judge and discourage others.

further more, there is no one career that is perfect.  if perfect careers exist, they must be where there is utopia.

weird that the selection mtg for hca on friday did not take place.  i was in the halifax rc and the mcc told me that the meeting was still a go ahead as of shortly after lunch.  so something must have happened.  anybody found out why?
 

MNM8

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The selection definitely did happen Friday as planned. My RC received notification yesterday afternoon and rang me today to give me an offer for DEO HCA starting Sept. 26.
 
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MNM8 said:
The selection definitely did happen Friday as planned. My RC received notification yesterday afternoon and rang me today to give me an offer for DEO HCA starting Sept. 26.

Nice! Congratz! Where are you located?
 
A

aesop081

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SheRa011 said:
it's one thing to let on that you did not enjoy your career and why, but it's another ball game to judge and discourage others.

Grow thicker skin.......not realy, do it. There was great advice, insights and a good dose of reality in some of these posts.

 

slyw0lf

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Congrats, my RC called me as well and offered me a DEO HCA position. I'm pretty excited to start my career and begin training in September.
 

cnobbs84

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slyw0lf said:
Congrats, my RC called me as well and offered me a DEO HCA position. I'm pretty excited to start my career and begin training in September.

What cfrc are you with?
 

Ayrsayle

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For those who just recently got their call - We have a bunch of us already on a facebook group. Send me PM and I'll give you the relevant details. Congrats again!
 

Brandon J

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For those that have been selected for September BMOQ we have a facebook group going.  PM Ayrsayle or I your name and where you are from and I'll add you to the group.  Congratulations and I look forward to meeting you all.
 
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I got in for HCA as well. Gave them a call today and they told me. I think they said their system was down and wasn't updating at the time but yeah see you all in Sept.
 

Staff Weenie

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Well, congrats to all who made it in. I still stand by my comments, and no cnobbs, I don't need a hug - I need competent HCAs coming up through the system to replace me someday. By the way, Simian Turner is also an HCA, with far more experience than myself. I would trust his assessments without reservation.

There's lots of words of advice available - hopefully you take them all to heart. Here's more than my two cents.

What we do is not a game - people can, and will, die - don't walk in with false bravado - it hurts, no matter how professional you try to be. Though we aren't clinicians, there is a very real potential that you will get blood on your hands. You may find yourself carrying patients, applying pressure, or even helping mop out the trauma bay floors. Maybe you'll find yourself holding the phone for a wounded soldier so he can tell his mother how he lost his fingers. Maybe you'll be talking to the father of a young child who died minutes earlier, to try and figure out what to do next.

You will hear the term Mission, Men, Yourself - these are your priorities, in order, from now on.

Admit and learn from your mistakes, your subordinates will respect you for that.

Dedicate yourself to your soldiers - without them, you are useless - they save lives, you help enable them to succeed. Earn their respect, don't demand it, and understand that earning it can take years, losing it can take seconds.

Be a leader. You will eventually be given command over some of the finest people in the world. If you really understand what command and leadership are, you will be energized, yet humbled by it, maybe even a bit intimidated, and you will never want to let it go.

Good luck in your careers, and if you ever want to ask questions, I am always here.
 

sky777

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Staff Weenie said:
Well, congrats to all who made it in. I still stand by my comments, and no cnobbs, I don't need a hug - I need competent HCAs coming up through the system to replace me someday. By the way, Simian Turner is also an HCA, with far more experience than myself. I would trust his assessments without reservation.

There's lots of words of advice available - hopefully you take them all to heart. Here's more than my two cents.

What we do is not a game - people can, and will, die - don't walk in with false bravado - it hurts, no matter how professional you try to be. Though we aren't clinicians, there is a very real potential that you will get blood on your hands. You may find yourself carrying patients, applying pressure, or even helping mop out the trauma bay floors. Maybe you'll find yourself holding the phone for a wounded soldier so he can tell his mother how he lost his fingers. Maybe you'll be talking to the father of a young child who died minutes earlier, to try and figure out what to do next.

You will hear the term Mission, Men, Yourself - these are your priorities, in order, from now on.

Admit and learn from your mistakes, your subordinates will respect you for that.

Dedicate yourself to your soldiers - without them, you are useless - they save lives, you help enable them to succeed. Earn their respect, don't demand it, and understand that earning it can take years, losing it can take seconds.

Be a leader. You will eventually be given command over some of the finest people in the world. If you really understand what command and leadership are, you will be energized, yet humbled by it, maybe even a bit intimidated, and you will never want to let it go.

Good luck in your careers, and if you ever want to ask questions, I am always here.
Nice post for all CF officers.Thanks a lot.
 
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Staff Weenie said:
Well, congrats to all who made it in. I still stand by my comments, and no cnobbs, I don't need a hug - I need competent HCAs coming up through the system to replace me someday. By the way, Simian Turner is also an HCA, with far more experience than myself. I would trust his assessments without reservation.

There's lots of words of advice available - hopefully you take them all to heart. Here's more than my two cents.

What we do is not a game - people can, and will, die - don't walk in with false bravado - it hurts, no matter how professional you try to be. Though we aren't clinicians, there is a very real potential that you will get blood on your hands. You may find yourself carrying patients, applying pressure, or even helping mop out the trauma bay floors. Maybe you'll find yourself holding the phone for a wounded soldier so he can tell his mother how he lost his fingers. Maybe you'll be talking to the father of a young child who died minutes earlier, to try and figure out what to do next.

You will hear the term Mission, Men, Yourself - these are your priorities, in order, from now on.

Admit and learn from your mistakes, your subordinates will respect you for that.

Dedicate yourself to your soldiers - without them, you are useless - they save lives, you help enable them to succeed. Earn their respect, don't demand it, and understand that earning it can take years, losing it can take seconds.

Be a leader. You will eventually be given command over some of the finest people in the world. If you really understand what command and leadership are, you will be energized, yet humbled by it, maybe even a bit intimidated, and you will never want to let it go.

Good luck in your careers, and if you ever want to ask questions, I am always here.

That was the best post that I've read since I became a member of this site. Thanks for that, it was very uplifting.
 

cnobbs84

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I agree. That was an eye opener and I do thank you for that. I have spoken with Siamian thru PM and agreed very knowledgeable and helpful
 
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