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Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread

Loachman

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2) And from Chair of National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians (a Liberal) following Committee's annual report--he wants more done to combat, in particular, PRC's foreign influence/interference activities in Canadian politics (India also likely active along these lines at lesser level):
I read that earlier today.

"The government's response to the Committee's reports has been limited," notes the report. Perhaps this hit too close to home.
 

MilEME09

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More from the National post, with China surging we our selves need a pacific shift more then we already have. The question is where will our Latvia of the Pacific be?
 

FJAG

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Oldgateboatdriver

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The best place for a Canadian "Latvia of the Pacific" would be onboard an Esquimalt based HMCS Bonaventure II. It would show how serious we are about the Pacific region and let us lead to the creation, or reincarnation rather, of SEATO. Integrated battle groups of Canadian carrier, Australian assault ships and combined destroyers/frigates and submarines would make a potent contribution to regional security, especially when paired with similar battle groups from the UK, the US, Japan and South Korea, even possibly India. You would have a nice encirclement of China, limiting it's ability to act as a bully in the region.

PS: And before people start saying: Oh! We can't afford a carrier": I am thinking about a carrier in style of the UK's Queen Elizabeth class. Highly automated with small crew (about 800) and a normal air wing in the 26-28 planes at about 500 air pers., surge capacity for full combat of about 50 airframes. We can expand the RCN and RCAF to do that without even getting close to the 2% of GDP we said we would soon be spending on defence.
 
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MilEME09

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The best place for a Canadian "Latvia of the Pacific" would be onboard an Esquimalt based HMCS Bonaventure II. It would show how serious we are about the Pacific region and let us lead to the creation, or reincarnation rather, of SEATO. Integrated battle groups of Canadian carrier, Australian assault ships and combined destroyers/frigates and submarines would make a potent contribution to regional security, especially when paired with similar battle groups from the UK, the US, Japan and South Korea, even possibly India. You would have a nice encirclement of China, limiting it's ability to act as a bully in the region.

PS: And before people start saying: Oh! We can't afford a carrier": I am thinking about a carrier in style of the UK's Queen Elizabeth class. Highly automated with small crew (about 800) and a normal air wing in the 26-28 planes at about 500 air pers., surge capacity for full combat of about 50 airframes. We can expand the RCN and RCAF to do that without even getting close to the 2% of GDP we said we would soon be spending on defence.
Or smaller scale, look at Japan and South Korea for smaller carriers that hold 12 to 24 airframes.
 

GR66

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The best place for a Canadian "Latvia of the Pacific" would be onboard an Esquimalt based HMCS Bonaventure II. It would show how serious we are about the Pacific region and let us lead to the creation, or reincarnation rather, of SEATO. Integrated battle groups of Canadian carrier, Australian assault ships and combined destroyers/frigates and submarines would make a potent contribution to regional security, especially when paired with similar battle groups from the UK, the US, Japan and South Korea, even possibly India. You would have a nice encirclement of China, limiting it's ability to act as a bully in the region.

PS: And before people start saying: Oh! We can't afford a carrier": I am thinking about a carrier in style of the UK's Queen Elizabeth class. Highly automated with small crew (about 800) and a normal air wing in the 26-28 planes at about 500 air pers., surge capacity for full combat of about 50 airframes. We can expand the RCN and RCAF to do that without even getting close to the 2% of GDP we said we would soon be spending on defence.
Or ditch the expensive single, floating airfield and triple the number of fighters and add some transport aircraft to supply them in dispersed airfields with mobile AD/ASuW missile batteries?
 

daftandbarmy

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Or ditch the expensive single, floating airfield and triple the number of fighters and add some transport aircraft to supply them in dispersed airfields with mobile AD/ASuW missile batteries?

I see your aircraft carrier and raise you an ice capable aircraft carrier.

Now that would be a brand statement heard around the world :)
 

Kirkhill

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One of the notions put about by the Brits is that of an MRSS or Multi-Role Support Ship with an intention to build up to six of them, possibly replacing both the Albions and the Bays which will be pressed into service as interim Littoral Strike Ships.

These Multi-Role Support Ships look a lot like the Support Ships Davie was proposing.

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It is also notable that the MRSS concept is being touted in conjunction with the Vanguard Strike Company which seems to have had some success against a USMC OpFor. And that every ship of the RN is likely to include an RM Commando Troop/Platoon in its complement.

Strike squad of just 100 Brit Marines smashed 1,500 US troops in war games drill​

A STRIKE squad of just 100 Marines smashed 1,500 US troops in a war games drill.

The shock victory has revolutionised military thinking.

The £400million drill in California had to be cut short because the British victory was so swift and unexpected
Our Future Commando Force attacked in the urban warfare exercise. Conventional tactics suggest they would need to heavily outnumber the defending Americans.

But working in eight teams of 12, they outmanoeuvred their rivals and used helicopter drones linked to screens on their chests to pinpoint weak spots.

The £400million drill in California had to be cut short because the British victory was so swift and unexpected.

Chief of the Defence Staff, General Sir Nick Carter, told The Sun yesterday: “This has overturned the principles of war. Mass is no longer the asset it once was — it is all about effect. If you concentrate your force, you are vulnerable.

“On the modern battlefield you want maximum dispersion to give your opponent maximum doubt.

“Then apply disposable technology that you don’t mind losing.”

Brigadier Dan Cheeseman, head of the Royal Navy’s hi-tech weapons wing, added: “This has turned around traditional thinking.”
Yesterday, the Future Commando Force and the new “tier two” special forces’ Rangers Regiment — similar to the US’s Green Berets — unveiled hi-tech weapons at the MoD’s Bovington Camp in Dorset.

Troops are experimenting with flying grenades, remote-controlled mortar bombs and “throwbots” which can be lobbed into buildings before soldiers conduct dangerous room-clearance operations.

Dave Young, regimental sergeant-major of 3 Commando Brigade, said: “If we’d had this kit in Afghanistan, there is no doubt it would have saved lives.”

The Navy is planning an exercise this year to see if Marines in jet suits can board a ship.

The Rangers Regiment will fight alongside rebels and freedom fighters in other countries’ wars.




Malaysia seems to have a broader definition of what an MRSS might be.

 

MarkOttawa

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A lefty who gets it, in the same mould as Orwell.
Terry is a good friend of mine. You are so bang on. A brilliant writer, a fierce moralist in his own way and, frankly, wasted on this country.

His mother worked for British SIGINT intercept service in WW II:

"Enigma SIGINT, or, “What Did You Do in the War, Mother?


Mark
Ottawa
 

MilEME09

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Another home run by Terry Glavin. I wish he would get more exposure in Canadian media. A lefty who gets it, in the same mould as Orwell.

In my opinion we need to cater to Taiwan more and China less. Let Beijing be mad, time to hunt down there spies, secret PLA training cells in Canada (if rumors are true) and cripple their network of reach
 

Colin Parkinson

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This applies to us as they can wipe out many of our fish stocks as well.

The sheer tonnage of China’s sixteen thousand hull fishing fleet and the fleet’s illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) practices exert their own gravitational pull for diplomatic, intelligence, military, and economic analysts globally. Contextualizing China’s massive fishing fleet within China’s grand strategy, identifying the most likely use case for the fleet, and assessing the most dangerous use case suggest the need for updates in the U.S. Department of Defense’s role in monitoring and addressing the assessed threats.
 

CBH99

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This applies to us as they can wipe out many of our fish stocks as well.

The sheer tonnage of China’s sixteen thousand hull fishing fleet and the fleet’s illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) practices exert their own gravitational pull for diplomatic, intelligence, military, and economic analysts globally. Contextualizing China’s massive fishing fleet within China’s grand strategy, identifying the most likely use case for the fleet, and assessing the most dangerous use case suggest the need for updates in the U.S. Department of Defense’s role in monitoring and addressing the assessed threats.
That would be quite the journey to make across the Pacific, and then back again, to fish.

You aren’t wrong. But talk about a long, slow trek...
 

GR66

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Aside from the fishing...say China were to invade Taiwan and surround their invasion fleet with hundreds or thousands of fishing ships. What would that do to our ability to target their warships with our missiles?
 

FJAG

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So how do you feel about those carbon taxes now, Justin?

China emitted more greenhouse gases in 2019 than all of the world's other developed nations put together​

  • Researchers estimated the greenhouse gas emissions of 190 different nations
  • They considered gases including carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide
  • China accounted for 27% of the world's 52 gigatons of CO2 equivalent emissions
  • However, on a per capita basis, China emits just less than the OECD average
  • Per person, the globe's worst emitter is the US, at 7.6 tons a head to China's 10.1
By IAN RANDALL FOR MAILONLINE

PUBLISHED: 10:04 EDT, 7 May 2021 | UPDATED: 12:02 EDT, 7 May 2021

China released a greater volume of greenhouse gases into Earth's atmosphere in 2019 than all of the world's developed nations put together, a study has found.
The eastern superpower has tripled its emission levels since the 1990s, crossing the 14 gigatons threshold for the first time ever in 2019.
Emission estimates for 190 nations across the globe were calculated by experts from research firm Rhodium Group in tandem with Breakthrough Energy.

The analysis considered six greenhouse gases — carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulphur hexafluoride.
Global emissions have risen 11.4 per cent in the last decade to reach 52 gigatons of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2019, with China responsible for 27 per cent of this.
The second-worst emitter was the US — accounting for 11 per cent of the total — with India edging out the EU for the first time to come in third at 6.6 per cent. ...

China emitted more greenhouse gases in 2019 than all developed nations

🍻
 

CBH99

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- The one lady's statement that for a month, they all watched in confusion as to what the massive Chinese fishing fleet was up to. And then it became clear... Ummmmmm...bit of an odd statement from someone who's full time job appears to be involved in the fight against illegal fishing :confused: My guess right off the bat is that the fishing boats were, you know, fishing... 😅:mad:



Bigger picture though, and in all seriousness - the Chinese appear to be focused entirely on the short term spectrum when it comes to their vast and aggressive fishing practices. I realize that people do need to eat, and fishing is an essential part of that -- but these activities seem to be fuelled far more by greed than necessity. And you won't be able to eat if you end up depleting the entire population because nobody decided to think ahead, or think about the bigger picture.

**I recently watched a documentary called Seaspiracy. If you ever want to be super angry to the point where you feel that you could easily find a fulfilling career by wiping out entire industries (I'm trying not to use language that advocates violence, but let's be real - some dickheads needs to go) - or sad/scared when you realize how much of the global ecosystem, including atmospheric composition & global warming issues are directly affected by shark populations - I highly recommend. If you don't want to be angry or sad, then probably best to avoid it.

Good movie though, and really shows just how deeply interconnected our ecosystem is. And all of this overfishing, and trying to catch things such as sharks and squid, is having very real impacts globally.
 
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