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Can a reservist possibly get the same training as Reg?

sharki9876

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I've been reading a lot that army reservists get a chopped down version of the Reg forces training program, obviously because its part time. People say you lightly touch on certain things and don't get a lot practice with them, and some things are just left out altogether.
For example, since I'm interested in an artillery regiment nearby (NCM), I've been researching that on these forums. I've found that artillery soldiers in the reserves don't learn about defending their gun positions and patrolling? That we don't learn up to mod 6 but only up to mod 4?
However, is it possible to opt in for the same training that the Reg forces get (basically fill in the blanks, get more practice and experience with previous skills)?

Maybe in the summer as a more full time deal?

Thank you,
Phil  :cdn:
 

mariomike

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sharki9876 said:
I've found that artillery soldiers in the reserves don't learn about defending their gun positions and patrolling? That we don't learn up to mod 6 but only up to mod 4?

Differences betwen PRes DP1 Artymen and Reg DP1 
http://army.ca/forums/threads/92629.0

 

Tibbson

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There is a lot more to it then just getting the training.  No point in doing the training, or having DND pay to provide it to you, if you are not in a position to utilize those skills to both keep them and further hone them. 
 

sharki9876

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So I guess that's a no?

Well hopefully I can still get a lot out of my reserves in the summer programs.
 

cryco

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Don't forget, as a reservist, can can volunteer to go on a tour or whatnot that will allow you to use what you've learned. In that case, I believe you can indeed take more advanced courses. Someone correct me if I'm wrong please.
 

Michael OLeary

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cryco said:
Don't forget, as a reservist, can can volunteer to go on a tour or whatnot that will allow you to use what you've learned. In that case, I believe you can indeed take more advanced courses. Someone correct me if I'm wrong please.

When a Reservist volunteers for a tour (opportunities for which are now very few compared to the later years of the Afghanistan mission), they will be expected to have certain qualifications to be eligible for the position they volunteer for. In some cases, personnel (Reg and Res) received training courses during predeployment training, usually for such things as driver qualifications for vehicles used overseas that were not commonly used in Canada (so there would have been no reasonable expectation for them to have the qualification beforehand). It's not a matter of "I volunteer for that UN driver position in Batshitistan, can I have a sniper course now?"
 

cryco

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Thanks for clearing that up. I mean what you said about the volunteering (the opportunity has to present itself) but you expressed it clearly.
batshitistan? lol.
 

toughenough

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Also keep in mind that the differences will vary on a course by course basis (not to be confused with a serial by serial basis).

So your DP1 may indeed have some variance, but your comms course or driver wheel course or any other number of courses may or may not be the equivalent to the RegF. As an example, the PLQ is interchangeable, and a lot of our MCpl's go on reg force serials to get the training when it fits into their work schedule.

Cheers
 

runormal

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sharki9876 said:
How often are the training exercise opportunities after I've graduated?

Depends on your unit/brigade. My unit is very busy supporting other units so we seldom get to train as unit together.

Are you going to school in the fall? Have you considered just going reg force?

Edit:
It depends on your availability as well, I know friends who have participated on major exercises such as Maple Resolve. It also depends if your unit gets spots for said taskings/exercises.
 

sharki9876

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I've thought about the regular forces, but I don't want to be on contract to go overseas since I am planning on attending post-secondary here.
I know the reserves are a passive entity in the forces, but I just want to be as active as possible in whatever unit I'm in. I do understand this is something I should take up with my recruiter though.

By exercises I meant things like going around Canada and training with other units.
I hope the units in Victoria offer things like this...  :camo:
 

Poacher434

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The reserves are what you make of it. Yes, the regular force is a 365 day/year gig and depending on the trade/position a member is in, they will be exponentially more knowledgeable than there 50 day/year reservist counterpart, but this is all to be considered with a enormous amount of variables.

The Army offers courses that both reservists and regular forces members can be candidates on together.

Examples.

When I did my Close Quarters Combat Instructor course, the course started off with 50ish candidates, 20ish reservists.
Advanced Small Arms, 40 candidates, 10 reservists
PLQ INF Mod 6, 40 candidates, 20 reservists.

I am not one to say reg or res is better than the other, both have stronger qualities in some things and weak ones in others.

When I was on my ASA there were regular force infantry master corporals who were not up to date on certain drills with weapon systems, who could not effectively teach advanced weapon lectures, and who could not even remember some weapon drills; this is not entirely at fault to them or due to incompetence, skill fade effects all members of the CF. If I remember correctly some of those regF members were recently posted and held a position that did not require them to teach, or to handle weapons to an infantry standard; at no fault of their own..

However, as a reservist and as a MCpl, much of my income was from teaching courses, and from teaching infantry courses my weapons handling and teaching was superior. So I was better at lectures, weapons handling, etc far more than my regF counterparts.... but those same members can out perform me on countless other things.


So in conclusion, if you have the time, the initiative, and the CoC to support you, there are a number of courses and postings that the forces offers that will allow you to achieve the same training as the regf.....

HOWEVER, and I cannot stress this enough... the real difficulty with being a reservist is that to remain current, up to date, and effective SOLELY RELIES ON YOUR INITIATIVE AND DEDICATION.... any joe schmoe can take a course, but a great soldier will practice it and allow limited skill fade.
 
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I have been wondering this as well; I'm looking into joining the reserves as either an infantryman or a combat engineer (I'm in Winnipeg where there are reserve units for both), and I keep finding conflicting information on where and when reservist training takes place, how much training there is, etc. This thread is giving me a better idea of what it's like so thank you everyone who has replied to OP.
 

VIChris

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sharki9876 said:
I've thought about the regular forces, but I don't want to be on contract to go overseas since I am planning on attending post-secondary here.
I know the reserves are a passive entity in the forces, but I just want to be as active as possible in whatever unit I'm in. I do understand this is something I should take up with my recruiter though.

By exercises I meant things like going around Canada and training with other units.
I hope the units in Victoria offer things like this...  :camo:

Did you get any more info about 5 Field Arty? I've worked along side them on a few exercises in a support role, and they seem quite active and professional. The Gunner's Mess has some great parties, too!

Further, to your original question, you'll find that PRes arty troops will indeed learn about gun line defense and some patrolling. Some of it is core soldier drills, some of the SOPs will be arty specific. Either way, if it's what you're after, they have it.
 
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