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C7/M16 modes

ramy

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I was just wondering if a soldier is issued a C7 when would the Full Auto feature be used , or in the case of the M16 the 3 shot burst ? I was thinking to provide supporting fire and possibly to clear rooms but if someone knows exactly that would be appreciated.
 

Kendrick

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For the 3 shot bursts on the more recent U.S. M16s, it was mostly a way to reduce ammo usage, after disastrous ammo consumption in earlier conflicts and engagements. 

As for the C7 full auto well you use it to your own liking.  House clearing and close quarters is a good one, support like you said too.  You want to be mindful of ammo wasting.  It's just comon sense.

I'm sure there are more knowledgeable people than me out there with more precise info, but I do believe I'm fairly right.
 

ImanIdiot

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I've only used full auto for FIBUA and taking a trench. Those seem like the most logical times to use it, I don't know how useful it would be in the support role, its just kinda unstable with long bursts...if it could handle the job I suppose each section wouldn't have 2 C9s.
 

48Highlander

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even for taking a trench....I know that our doctrine is that you go in full auto, and I've always taught it that way to my troops, but it seems like a waste.  chances are, the individuals in the trench are already dead from the granade you've posted, and even if they're not, a trench is a REALLY small space.  2 or 3 shots should be all that's required to dispatch anyone still hiding in there.  it looks real nice, and the agression's great and all, but it IS a waste of ammunition.
 

Kendrick

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Thing is, when you charge a trench, you're supposed to be running like crazy, and even if its a small place, popping 2 or 3 precise shots while charging is a pretty good feat.  Usually theres no real time for aimed shoulder shots and a good spray is the most efficient way to clear it.  IMO.
 

1feral1

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ImanIdiot said:
oh....forgot to mention the classic.......aussie peelback.

Alfter serving almost 10 yrs in the Australian Army (working with Grunts, Buckets, Ginger Beers, Engineers, and Drop Shorts), I have never heard of this term used (either orally or written), and only found out that it exists on this website a while back.

As for the M16A2's and burst controil feature, I have seen it here with the USMC and US Army. However Colt makes the A2 version without this feature, and without the new type rear sights too.

Here A2 Colt's and Bushmasters, along with older A1's made by Colt anad GM.

I have seen A2's used by PNG, Fiji, Brunei and Singapore. Some with 3rd burst, some without, some with the new type rear sights, some with standard field sights (like on the original C7 and C8).

Cheers,

Wes
 

Byerly

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"As for the C7 full auto well you use it to your own liking"

That is not entirely true.  Most often you will have a fire control order from whoever is in charge of you.  If you are doing a section attack and given the order of slow rate, automatic fire would not be appreciated by your section commander.  Clearing drills, whether it be room or trench are however, generally done on automatic.

Stu
 

Kendrick

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True, however, even on slow or moderate fire rates, you can still use single shots or full auto, and let go scarce small bursts.  Now granted that it's not exactly a smart way of doing things, its an option.
 

HollywoodHitman

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Wes,

The "Aussie Peelback" is a quick witdrawal method. The idea is that each soldier dumps a full mag on full auto then withdraws, then once past the soldier behind him, that soldier opens fire and so on and so on. I have no idea why it's called and Aussie Peelback, but it's common 'round these here parts.

fire control is given by the sect. comdr. Fibua or trench clearing is where fully auto is often used, however it must be understood that there is now more of a focus on positive target ID before opening fire to prevent civvy casualties. spray and pray is more an american style from my experience, but you never need it until you need it. my vague 2 cents,

TM
 

1feral1

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Kinda like a hasty withdrawl sorta then eh.

As for auto here, the rifle has a two stage trigger 6 lbs semi, 11 lbs auto. In range pracs, auto is rarely used at all, but on ex's (live fire and blanks) when the SHTF (jungle fighting, CQB etc), auto (controlled bursts) is at the discretion of the user, but again one must pay attn to his ammo supply, and keep an ear open to his Secco too.


Cheers,

Wes
 

foerestedwarrior

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ImanIdiot said:
I've only used full auto for FIBUA and taking a trench. Those seem like the most logical times to use it, I don't know how useful it would be in the support role, its just kinda unstable with long bursts...if it could handle the job I suppose each section wouldn't have 2 C9s.


FIBUA, or OBUA, or whater the catch phrase is today, is taught that you use aimed double taps...on repitition, not auto, and trench clearing, kendrick, you should already be very near the trench when you go to shoot into it, the drills call for you to "post" not "throw" the nade into the trench, to post you have to be dam close. When i do trench clearing, i am usually about a foot away, I also button hook(debatable practice) Auto, something I have used twice, both times were on my PWT3. I always use rep. you can get off a bunch of quick shots if you need to, but you can make them accurate as weel, not two rounds at them, and 2 into the sky.
 
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