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Arty Question

Nfld Sapper

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241 said:
Yeah I guess, we can get you to point it in the right direction and make it go boom, its a start haha ;D

So you mean C-4 doesn't go in the barrel  ;D

:cheers:
 

George Wallace

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The NFLD Grinch said:
So you mean C-4 doesn't go in the barrel  ;D

:cheers:

Nope!  It goes in the Breech..........or wrapped around the barrel and/or recuperators.    >:D
 

241

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George Wallace said:
Nope!  It goes in the Breech..........or wrapped around the barrel and/or recuperators.    >:D

Evil....Go shovel or some thing
 

combatbuddha

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241 said:
Then they would be 2 of the only ones out there, they wouldn't happen to be the guns used by the local engineers for salutes would they, if so that could explain the fact they are serviceable a: required for a national task (salutes) b: hardly ever driven therefore not as much wear.



Congratulations, but according to the briefing we got from our CO based on the Arty CO's brief he received, they are using C3s now weather you prefired a few that are going out and there are going to be some C3's as well or perhaps could the guns you checked be the ones leased to the BC government (or who ever it is) that thy fire from garage like buildings? Also C1s and C2s both have short barrels, far as I remember the only difference was the trails, but you know that you prefired them. 

Just checked your profile, apparently you are a toon.
I will attempt to educate you.
There are only 3 AVCON guns used by the CF and they are C2s modified for firing from preset positions in the Rogers Pass. These guns are "owned" by 1 RCHA. I know the AVCON guns on an intimate level almost as well as I know the LG1's the 1st Regiment uses as well as the M777s that are part of the travelling roadshow. In case your toon mind is wondering, that is 1 RCHA. I have been working there for the past 7 years. AND my name is embossed on the wall of the Snow Punchers Lounge. If any members of 1 RCHA read this, please correct me if I am wrong. Toons need not apply.
I believe there is one C2 that is "owned" by the BC gov't for use around 100 Mile House. It is painted yellow. B Maint Esquimalt has done the prefires on that gun in the past. I do not know who is responsible for it's current maintenance and upkeep.
Ding. Class is dismissed
 

rampage800

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CombatBuddha

Your going to make a lot of people on here upset using terminology like "toons" and stuff, just saying, thats all ;)

WRT the gun issue, yea, I'm pretty sure its the C2s up there, Scary took them up. Your info seems GTG and 241, well he heard it from someone who had a brief who heard it from another guy so....................
 

rampage800

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Easy Cdn Aviator

While I don't support some of CombatBuddhas terminology you could probably see why he got a little upset.
 
A

aesop081

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rampage800 said:
Easy Cdn Aviator

While I don't support some of CombatBuddhas terminology you could probably see why he got a little upset.

He could have made his point without the insults. I'm sure he's well aware of that, but he decided to grown the one eyebrow, drive his fangs into the floor and stoop to being an idiot. I just called a spade a spade.
 

241

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CDN Aviator said:
You have succesfuly showed him that you are an idiot....good job !

Hahahahahaha he sure did, but hey we will just let him continue to be the AVCON SME since he knows all there is to know about it, bet he could recite every Bearing and Elevation or every firing position and a 10 figure grid to each firing position.  As for the "toon" reference, thats fine, let him say what he needs to feel better about himself, I will stop him once I hear an original one that I haven't heard yet. You know you can tell the "better" (for lack of better words) regular force folk that don't feel intimidated or whatever it is that compells these ones to act like that.  Good to see nothing has changed out in Shilo since I was last out there, us "rentals" are still to be treated like trash, and this is why 99% of the troops we send to work with 1RCHA would rather drink draino than work with them again.

Anyway CombatBuddha (I am sure that proably refers to that spare tire hanging around your waste), I am sure that either a MOD will be by shortly or someone else will et you straight, and if that doesn't work I am sure you are destined to go put your foot in your month in another thread as well so Merry Christmas, and if you are feeling down this Holiday season feel free to come on here and call me what ever name you feel cause I am aways happy to help.  I am comfortable with what I am, even if you aren't.
 

combatbuddha

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Nope, I don't use them, just fix them, competently.

I'm not the AVCON SME and never claimed that either. I couldn't recite a bearing or elevation as I have never been at that job, and I don't think I ever claimed that I had. I do think that I am rather skilled at fixing them and take some pride in my work.

My nickname here relates to my religious beliefs. As for the spare tire, yup, it's here and fully inflated.



 

Bruce Monkhouse

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combatbuddha said:
Right, thanks for that. Just trying to fit in.

The thing is if it wasn't for you being a moron in your post it would have made very educational reading.

Knock it off
.
Bruce

 

241

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combatbuddha said:
Nope, I don't use them, just fix them, competently.

I'm not the AVCON SME and never claimed that either. I couldn't recite a bearing or elevation as I have never been at that job, and I don't think I ever claimed that I had. I do think that I am rather skilled at fixing them and take some pride in my work.

My nickname here relates to my religious beliefs. As for the spare tire, yup, it's here and fully inflated.

Well perhaps it was just the way you worded your post but it an off a litte strong to me, like was said I was just passing on info that was passed from the Arty COs conerence (both reg & res) that was held in Nov I beleive so perhaps things changed, parts where found, or some one was miss informed as to the status of the AVCON guns. Regaurdless its in the past, thanks or the info you passed on and have a wonderful Holiday Season.


"Toon".......................
 

Petard

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rampage800 said:
They are indeed C1s in the Rogers Pass, just in case anyone was still wondering  ;D

But with modified C3 recoil mech's
There should be bold stencilling on the recuperators indicating the new change in nitrogen pressure because of this mod

 

Nfld Sapper

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From the current Maple Leaf:

Fifty years of fighting avalanches
by Steve Fortin

This year marks 50 years of a unique service provided by Reserve Force artillery soldiers to residents of and travellers through the Rocky Mountain area of B.C.

In 1881, Major Albert Bowman Rogers, working for the Canadian Pacific Railway, discovered the pass that now bears his name. Sent to the southeastern part of British Columbia to scout a passage for the railway that would link eastern Canada to the new member of Confederation at the western side of the continent, Maj Rogers confirmed that such a pass existed. Work started three years later, in 1884, on the transcontinental railway that would cross the Selkirk Mountains through Rogers Pass.

From 1885 to 1916, operating the railway through the pass was a hazardous undertaking. The human and financial costs, particularly those arising from dealing with the avalanches and major snowfalls—the area has an average annual snowfall of 12 metres—led the railway to dig the Connaught Tunnel underpass.

Later, an 18-km stretch of the TransCanada Highway, the main route through the Rocky Mountains, was built from Loop Brook, in the west, to Stoney Creek, in the east. However, the risk of avalanches still remains.

Since 1959, Canadian soldiers have taken part in one of the largest avalanche prevention programs in Canada, protecting those 18 kilometres of highway. For the first 10 years, the program was carried out by 2 and 3 Regiments, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery (RCHA) almost without interruption. When these regiments were transferred to CFB Shilo, the latter’s artillery took over the job.

Marc George is the director of CFB Shilo’s Central Museum of the Royal Canadian Artillery. For a long time, he’s been interested in the history of the avalanche prevention efforts of the soldiers of the various RCHA regiments. “Historically, the avalanche prevention program was the job of the Manitoba regiments,” he says. “But when 3 RCHA was assigned to Cyprus in 1981-1982, artillery soldiers from 2 RCHA in Petawawa took over. They also participated in two program rotations in 2005.”

Their work is essential to the safety of the people who travel the Rogers Pass route. From 1959 to 1962, under the operation now called PALACI, the soldiers conducted test firings. Since the road opened in 1962, a detachment of artillery soldiers has been posted there during the avalanche season, from early October to late May. They use 105 mm C-1 howitzers specially modified for precision firing. The shock of the exploding shells triggers controlled avalanches. In a normal season, between 350 and 1 900 projectiles are fired.

From 1962 to the early 1990s, a single gun was used; then, a second howitzer was added for faster and more effective avalanche protection. The number of CF personnel assigned to avalanche prevention operations was increased accordingly. From seven or eight soldiers taking part in the four to five rotations per winter before the 1990s, the number of soldiers taking part in the program grew to 15 with the arrival of the second gun.

To underline the importance of the work being done by the artillery soldiers protecting Rogers Pass, Mr. George points to the number of shells that have been fired to prevent avalanches. “It’s calculated that from 1962 to 1983, over 13 000 heavy shells were fired by heavy guns,” he says. “Between 1984 and 2007, the number climbed to 15 600, notably because a second gun was added to ensure the safety of travellers who use this magnificent but rather capricious route across the Rockies.”

Soldiers from Reserve Force artillery units throughout the country have served in detachments assigned to the avalanche prevention program.

12-05-06a.jpg

Bdr Scott (left) and Sgt Pratt await the order to fire.

12-05-06b.jpg

Bdr Hill (left), Sgt Melsted and Bdr Grabauskas, artillery soldiers, are ready to fire.

 

muskrat89

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I hope those weren't the captions published with the photos in the original article. They can neither be "waiting to fire" or "ready to fire" with the breech open and no round loaded.
 
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