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AOR Replacement & the Joint Support Ship (Merged Threads)

FSTO

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Question from the resident crayon eater:

How long should it take to build this ship?
Well the Korean yards can do something like this in 20 to 24 months (likely even less). But Seaspan had to retool and the first of class is always the slowest. We've known we needed to replace the AOR's back in the 90's. We are just bad at planning and long range thinking.
 

OldSolduer

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Well the Korean yards can do something like this in 20 to 24 months (likely even less). But Seaspan had to retool and the first of class is always the slowest. We've known we needed to replace the AOR's back in the 90's. We are just bad at planning and long range thinking.
Thank you so 40-42 months would not be unreasonable?
 

FSTO

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Thank you so 40-42 months would not be unreasonable?
If you were building from scratch, even longer. But this was a mature design (the AOR is very basic; gas, ammo, food and spare parts, living quarters, engine room, RAS deck and flight deck not much variations from that base requirements) so it should be quicker timeline.

Then again, I'm a MARS officer and our profession has a reputation of being unreasonable! :)
 

Colin Parkinson

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If you were building from scratch, even longer. But this was a mature design (the AOR is very basic; gas, ammo, food and spare parts, living quarters, engine room, RAS deck and flight deck not much variations from that base requirements) so it should be quicker timeline.

Then again, I'm a MARS officer and our profession has a reputation of being unreasonable! :)
Don't underestimate the ripple effect of "minor changes". Move a bulkhead, then you have to adapt all your cable runs, is that bulkhead load bearing and if so how are you dealing with that load. Even upgrading to modern equipment will mean different mounting points, new designed cable runs, maybe you need more or less ventilation in that compartment, fire hazards, RF interference, etc. Not to mention that favourite thing, stability calculations.
This is why I am a advocate of planning to upgun your naval vessels like the AOPs/AOR's with designed in hardpoints, cabling, space for magazines, ammunition hoists, armour, fire supprsion and spare power and cable runs for future sensors. You may never need to, but it will be a damm sight easier if you have to in the future. Not to mention if you calculate some future weight gain from weapons, it increases your stability fudge factor.
 

Stoker

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And the answer is (drum roll) G-LAM
Well maybe not the complete answer but it does check off a lot of boxes. RAS capable, troops and equipment, looks like room for 3 S92 sized helicoptors, UAVs, large flight deck, ice capable (not sure to what class), etc. 3 or 4 of these could fill in a lot of gaps in multiple theatres.
Ice capable but not allowed by her insurance to go above 60.
 

Grimey

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I guess that we both won, in that we are still alive…
Me too, but looking over the stability curves in the MCR it didn’t take much for that righting moment to disappear. About half the AMR flooded out and she wasn’t coming back.
 
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