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All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

brihard

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As a retired person, I appreciate the police officers, firefighters and paramedics who complied with the vaccine mandate. They stepped up and prevented a staffing crisis.

They are supporting their fellow members and the public they swore an oath to serve.
The overwhelming majority of us didn’t so much ‘comply with the mandate’, but rather when they shoved some stupid form at us, said “yeah, I did that five months ago, please keep up.” The mandate is a purely administrative exercise for most of us.
 

mariomike

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they shoved some stupid form at us, said “yeah, I did that five months ago, please keep up.”
I guess the "us" part depends on jurisdiction.

Pretty simple in the one I am familiar with.

As of 31 Oct. without documented proof of being double vaxxed - not tested - they went on unpaid suspension.

Apparently the employer on the west side of Etobicoke Creek is more tolerant of the vaccine hesitant.

They offer rapid testing. For now.

Depends on which side of the creek you work.
 

brihard

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I guess the "us" part depends on jurisdiction.

Pretty simple in the one I am familiar with.

As of 31 Oct. without documented proof of being double vaxxed - not tested - they went on unpaid suspension.

Apparently the employer on the west side of Etobicoke Creek is more tolerant of the vaccine hesitant.

They offer rapid testing. For now.

Depends on which side of the creek you work.
Ours is “trust but verify”. Attest to your status now and they’ll catch up on verification later, knowing that the vast majority will be honest and that those who aren’t will suffer serious consequences once caught.
 

mariomike

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Ours is “trust but verify”. Attest to your status now and they’ll catch up on verification later, knowing that the vast majority will be honest and that those who aren’t will suffer serious consequences once caught.

Depends on the jurisdiction. Sometimes , just being on the other side of a creek can make a difference.

The City of Toronto requires proof of vaccination from all employees. Proof means documentation verifying receipt of a vaccination series approved by Health Canada or the World Health Organization.
 

Booter

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There were some detachments with low rates, but overwhelmingly before all this mandate stuff my district was already vaccinated. Because we d spent a year dealing with it and were thankful to have the breakthrough.

I believe there was one person that abstained in the district. Which is a pretty large area.

Then the mandate came 🤷‍♀️
 

daftandbarmy

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Double vaxxed Conservative MP tests positive; his unvaxxed peers will have to self isolate for the opening of Parliament


GIF by NBC
 

daftandbarmy

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Glass half full....


Money Can Make or Break Your Mental Health​

The proof is in the data on suicide rates during the pandemic.


COVID-19 has killed people’s loved ones, plunged millions into unemployment, and deprived many of human touch for months at a stretch. In many ways, the pandemic has been a “perfect storm” for suicide risk. But recent data shows people in high and middle-income countries actually killed themselves at lower rates in 2020. There’s one big reason: money.

Governments gave their citizens cash to weather the lockdowns. For many poor people, the pandemic money exceeded the regular social assistance and wages they would have otherwise earned. Poverty dropped in the U.S., and despite all the grief and isolation and anxiety, suicide rates dropped along with it. In Canada, where the emergency government payments were large and lasting, the suicide rate dropped 30 percent, according to provisional data. Altogether, suicides rates in 2020 either decreased or stayed flat in 21 high and middle-income countries (there’s very little data on the pandemic’s effect on suicide in poor countries). Cash transfers to poor people appear to have reduced suicides.

The 2020 decline in suicides is just the latest evidence that poverty drives suicide. In recent years, researchers have found that suicide rates are the highest among the poorest people. The children of people on welfare are twice as likely to die by suicide. Homeless people kill themselves about 10 times as often as people with housing.

Poor people are more vulnerable to suicide because the strain of poverty drastically increases a person’s odds of developing a mental illness. Low socioeconomic status causes roughly half of mental illnesses. People are much more likely to develop illnesses like depression, bipolar disorder, and even schizophrenia when they don’t have enough money to meet their material needs. Researchers have long found that suicide rates and psychiatric hospitalizations reliably go up in the wake of rising unemployment.

Fortunately, money fixes the same problems it causes. Unemployment rates have much less of an effect on suicide in countries with stronger financial supports for people who lose their jobs, according to a study that compared New Zealand, which made steep cuts to its welfare state amid a recession, to Finland, which didn’t. Fewer poor people died by suicide in Indonesia after the government began giving them money. Upping the minimum wage lowers suicide rates among poor people in the U.S. The conclusion is simple: Preventing people from living in poverty prevents suicides.

 

QV

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Some perspective on this.


The federal institutions continue to own goal themselves when it comes to fostering trust. Either C19 is the crisis of our generation or it isn't. If it is, then they'd better add "haste" to their processes for keeping the public dutifully and accurately informed. Anything less deserves immediate firing.
 

Remius

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The federal institutions continue to own goal themselves when it comes to fostering trust. Either C19 is the crisis of our generation or it isn't. If it is, then they'd better add "haste" to their processes for keeping the public dutifully and accurately informed. Anything less deserves immediate firing.
It’s likely more like a case of bureaucratic process that can’t keep up with the type of demand. It seems like the request was somewhat and unusually large. The other fact is that the FDA did agree to immediately release the info which is a good sign for transparency. The process though somewhat slowed by size and ressources I would guess. Then add the current working conditions (admittedly I am basing that on the current delays I see in our own government processes and not theirs.)

I do agree with your sentiment though. “Haste” is easier said than done though.
 

Fishbone Jones

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I wonder, if someone commits suicide while testing positive for covid, do they consider it a covid death for the count?
 

Fishbone Jones

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It's a valid question. I just researched it and in some places "COVID-19 is listed as the immediate or underlying cause of death, or listed as one of the significant conditions contributing to death. Or, if there is a confirmed COVID-19 infection from a lab test — and, the cause of death doesn't meet exclusion criteria, like trauma, suicide, homicide, overdose, motorcycle accident, etc."

It stems from a motorcycle accident, in Florida, where the driver was killed and it was initially listed as a covid death. The governor questioned it and it was corrected.

I can't speak to the rules for every jurisdiction or what a coroner considers cause of death.

There appear to be cases where the opposite has happened. An investigation in Florida found that several deaths were wrongly attributed to the virus, including the case of a man who died from a gunshot wound to the head .
 
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Remius

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It's a valid question. I just researched it and in some places "COVID-19 is listed as the immediate or underlying cause of death, or listed as one of the significant conditions contributing to death. Or, if there is a confirmed COVID-19 infection from a lab test — and, the cause of death doesn't meet exclusion criteria, like trauma, suicide, homicide, overdose, motorcycle accident, etc."

It stems from a motorcycle accident, in Florida, where the driver was killed and it was initially listed as a covid death. The governor questioned it and it was corrected.

I can't speak to the rules for every jurisdiction or what a coroner considers cause of death.


There are international guidelines on how to classify COVID 19 related deaths.

Stats Can has a few good documents to read through that you can add to your research.



From the second link: It is also possible that the death may have been influenced by COVID-19 but caused by another disease or an unintentional injury event. In these situations, COVID-19 should still be recorded on the medical certificates of cause of death, but would not be considered a death due to COVID-19.
 

mariomike

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mariomike

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This shows the "significant increase" in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests during Covid.

In this population-based, cross-sectional study, out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and deaths during the COVID-19 pandemic significantly increased compared with the same period the previous year and were associated with older age, nonwhite race/ethnicity, hypertension, diabetes, physical limitations, and nonshockable presenting rhythms. Identifying patients with the greatest risk for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and death during the COVID-19 pandemic should allow for early, targeted interventions in the outpatient setting that could lead to reductions in out-of-hospital deaths.


Not sure if cardiac arrest DOAs not transported to hospital by paramedics are tested by the coroner, or included in the Covid death count.
 
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