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All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

brihard

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Well, there’s the announcement. Core public administration inclusive of CAF, RCMP, CBSA etc will now have mandatory vaccinations by October 29th, with LWOP for noncompliance by mid November. Specifically mentioned, CAF will see something from CDS soon (I assume a CANFORGEN).
 
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Weinie

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Laugh all you want, but AI is going to end up doing 75% of what doctors do and I can tell you from personal experience that with chronic issues your better off belonging to a group that suffers from similar than to purely rely on the current healthcare system.
Ummmm.........don't understand what you are trying to say here Colin. Perhaps some context would help.
 

brihard

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Ummmm.........don't understand what you are trying to say here Colin. Perhaps some context would help.
I totally get what he’s saying. Especially if you have a rare chronic condition, communities of other suffers can be incredibly supportive and informative compared to an hour with your doctor once or twice a month, when they may never have encountered your condition before.

While the pic above was satire, Colin’s not wrong- the healthcare system does pretty well with most stuff most of the time for most people. The farther outside of the normal distribution your health problems are, the tougher good care can be to get.
 

Weinie

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I totally get what he’s saying. Especially if you have a rare chronic condition, communities of other suffers can be incredibly supportive and informative compared to an hour with your doctor once or twice a month, when they may never have encountered your condition before.

While the pic above was satire, Colin’s not wrong- the healthcare system does pretty well with most stuff most of the time for most people. The farther outside of the normal distribution your health problems are, the tougher good care can be to get.
And that is the context I was looking for, albeit from a different source. My comment wasn't meant to be critical, rather quizzical.
 
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brihard

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By weird coincidence I have three friends or acquaintances (two current or former CAF) who all have a rare genetic condition called Ehlers-Danlos; it’s a connective tissue disease. They’ve all had a hell of a time getting traction with the healthcare system, and happen to have found solid support from other sufferers. The internet is amazing for things like that. One of those things I’ve been fortunate to learn vicariously.
 

Colin Parkinson

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Have a heart attack, get into a car accident and our Healthcare system does very well, it 's really seems to be designed around the ER. GP's are really hit or miss, they used to be better in my opinion, but the costs of running a practise and the funding model drives a system where the GP is under pressure to limit your call/visit to a 15 minute window.
Sidenote, we used to have a GP who was hated by the hospital staff and labs because she took "taking the side of the patient" to the extreme. She was old school when you asked for a full physical, she make a WWII intake doctor proud. She was not afraid of the human body, unlike most physicians even before Covid, who seem reluctant to examine you. She was also the spitting image of Olive oyl from the Popeye cartoon/movie.
 

Brad Sallows

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After doctors finish "basic" (med school), there's a merit-based pecking order for applying for the high-speed specialty slots. Those who don't make the cut for something more demanding (and lucrative) get to be GPs. (I'm sure there are some people who elect to be GPs.)

GPs have to be good enough to recognize when people urgently need referral for the diagnostics that will prove they need immediate specialty care.

What I see as the two weakest points of Canadian health care are a) some routine/elective procedures, for which people languish a long time on waiting lists; and b) proving you need urgent life-saving care.

Everyone I know who had a (b) problem and got the proof subsequently got onto a pretty fast track for life-saving care. And that part of our system is pretty much as good as anyone else's.
 

a_majoor

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While "we" get more draconian restrictions in place, Sweden gets better results without:


So what exactly is happening in Sweden that work better than lockdowns and mandates? It seems that doubling down isn't doing the job in Canada or the US (and of course there are similar disparities in outcomes between States with and without the lockdowns and mandates).

Maybe it's time to do some serious research so Canadians can get out from under lockdowns, mandates and get back to our daily lives.
 

Bruce Monkhouse

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I tried to find any other webpage that supported the above post and couldn't find one.

Its low now because so many people freakin' died......I'll take our cough lockdowns thanks.
 

mariomike

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Interesting website.
 

HiTechComms

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Interesting website.

High Vaccination rates.

 

brihard

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Sweden’s still running about double our death rate per capita, and between 2.5 - 3x case rate per capita. Not sure they’re as good a comparison as some would think? With their death rate we’d have about 55,000 dead Canadians. At double the case rate I expect we’d have seen critical care system collapse in Ontario, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and possibly BC and Quebec.

I don’t understand why Sweden still gets touted the way it does. The only way their results can be held to be ‘better’ is by discarding a lot of human life.
 

HiTechComms

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I tried to find any other webpage that supported the above post and couldn't find one.

Its low now because so many people freakin' died......I'll take our cough lockdowns thanks.
Basic math. Flatten the curve. Deaths over Time. The only way to flatten the curve was to stretch the time frame which would essentially lower the curve. Flattening the curve just simply meant you are not gone get sick now you will get sick later. Slowing down an infection doesn't stop it. The whole point according to the politicians and medical community was to not overload the health care system.

Sweden's dry tinder got lit up and burned up compared to lets say Canada where we simply have a smouldering fire. Same numbers in the end of dead. The only difference will be how much it will cost to reach those end numbers.

Not making an argument for or against. Just a different strategy.
 

HiTechComms

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Sweden’s still running about double our death rate per capita, and between 2.5 - 3x case rate per capita. Not sure they’re as good a comparison as some would think? With their death rate we’d have about 55,000 dead Canadians. At double the case rate I expect we’d have seen critical care system collapse in Ontario, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and possibly BC and Quebec.

I don’t understand why Sweden still gets touted the way it does. The only way their results can be held to be ‘better’ is by discarding a lot of human life.
BC had more Opioid deaths per yer then Covid. If life actually meant anything we would have done something about it.

Lastly Canada is entering a demographic winter. Most provinces have more people over 65 then under 15. All western countries have this problem. You think people dying now is a problem. Wait another 5 years. We will go bankrupt due to sheer strain on our health care as per statistical usage of health care of an individual over the age of 70.
 

GR66

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Sweden's dry tinder got lit up and burned up compared to lets say Canada where we simply have a smouldering fire. Same numbers in the end of dead. The only difference will be how much it will cost to reach those end numbers.
I don't understand where you get the highlighted part. From the same Worldometer site:

Canada: Deaths per 1 million population - 737
Sweden: Deaths per 1 million population - 1,459

Literally twice the death rate as Canada.
 

brihard

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Sweden’s currently running about double the active cases per capita that we are. Their average daily rate of new cases per capita is a bit lower than ours now due to the Alberta spike- we have not fared well in this spike primarily due to Alberta - but Sweden’s tinder is hardly burned.
 
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