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All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

Messerschmitt

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In regards to the side effect of getting the vaccination, to be fair - that could happen to almost anyone, with any vaccine. My sister got a pretty routine vaccination before travelling 2 years ago, her entire body erupted in a BRUTAL rash overnight. It went away fairly quickly.

People will have some random reactions to the vaccine, that's just a part of life. And it isn't limited to Covid vaccines. I don't think 'those types' of reactions are really newsworthy, as it's no different than having a mild reaction to a flu vaccine.

And I do agree with you that the media is biased in what it reports and how it reports it -- I agree there is a narrative.
I'm glad there are people who are still open minded and open to discussion and not just spew "antivax, conspirationist and batshit crazy" when they don't agree.

In the recent years it seems there is no discussions allowed on many public spaces, and everything is deleted if it doesn't follow the narrative. And most resort to personal attacks vs actually sitting down and analyzing things.

My vax booklet is full, and that includes the HPV vax as a male. But I do have some serious doubts about these COVID ones. Especially for anybody under 60. The last thing I would do is try to change someones mind not to vax himself. In the end it's his/her body, choice.

Then I found this report

"Since there are few people who die from COVID-19 in Norway, the risk of dying after vaccination with the AstraZeneca vaccine would be higher than the risk of dying from the disease, particularly for younger people," says Bukholm.
Hopefully the Norwegian Institute of Public Health is not too batshit crazy and spreads "misinformation" that many seem to like to throw around
 

CBH99

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I'm glad there are people who are still open minded and open to discussion and not just spew "antivax, conspirationist and batshit crazy" when they don't agree.

In the recent years it seems there is no discussions allowed on many public spaces, and everything is deleted if it doesn't follow the narrative. And most resort to personal attacks vs actually sitting down and analyzing things.

My vax booklet is full, and that includes the HPV vax as a male. But I do have some serious doubts about these COVID ones. Especially for anybody under 60. The last thing I would do is try to change someones mind not to vax himself. In the end it's his/her body, choice.

Then I found this report


Hopefully the Norwegian Institute of Public Health is not too batshit crazy and spreads "misinformation" that many seem to like to throw around
Being open minded & open to discussion - especially reasonable discussion - is the only intelligent and logical way forward on ANYTHING. To immediately label someone as batshit crazy or a conspiracy theorist, simply for questioning the narrative, isn't helpful or even logical.

(Not taking a jab at anyone, that is my opinion regardless of the subject matter.)

In my own personal opinion, believing everything a politician or mainstream media outlet says without any independent thinking is far more dangerous and 'crazy' than questioning things. It's downright stupid.



There are valid points being made on both sides of the Covid debate, and that doesn't mean either side is right or wrong. Unfortunately, humans tend to naturally take one side or another, and label the other side as wrong - to their own detriment.

There is plenty of reason to debate and question why infection rates skyrocket in some areas with lockdowns while decline in areas with none.

There is plenty of reason to debate and question vaccination for it - while I personally am vaccinated, and strongly encourage others to do so. (The risk of serious consequences of a vaccine are miniscule compared to the risks associated with actually getting Covid.)

There is plenty of information coming out of various studies (some are even peer-reviewed now) - and various universities and health authorities about the actual effectiveness of masks, whether Covid or variants are truly airborne or not, why infection rates have dropped in some areas even before a large enough mass of people were vaccinated, etc etc.

Discussing various ideas, opinions, and sources of info is what a discussion forum is for. Not sure what is gained or helpful by putting words in someone's mouth & then being dismissive of what they didn't even say.
 

PMedMoe

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True......one of the needles we got in my basic back in 78 (think it was yellow fever) , made me unbelievably sick for a night and next day.
Yellow Fever is a live vaccine. I once got a mild case of typhoid from a live typhoid vaccine.
 

mariomike

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Discussing various ideas, opinions, and sources of info is what a discussion forum is for.
The problems seem to arise when members can not agree on the facts.
 

daftandbarmy

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Know what also causes blisters?

Fire.

View attachment 65004


Im Fine GIF
 

daftandbarmy

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Comforting .... not:

6-feet rule virtually ineffective at preventing COVID spread indoors: MIT study

Researchers Martin Bazant and John Bush say, in most cases, exposure to the airborne virus is not be prevented by social distancing alone

According to a new study from researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, staying six feet away from others does little to curb the spread of COVID-19 indoors.

Released Tuesday (April 27), “A Guideline to Limit Indoor Airborne Transmission of COVID-19” suggests virus-laden respiratory droplets emitted from an infected person pose more of an exposure risk than commonplace social distancing rules mitigate.

That’s according to mathematicians Martin Bazant and John Bush.

The duo generated a formula to simulate rooms where respiratory droplets expelled from an infected person wearing a mask were “well-mixed” or evenly spread throughout a room.

Depending on variables – including the size of the space, number of people, type of activity, whether masks are worn and ventilation or filtration measures – the risk of COVID-19 exposure was reduced or heightened.

In calmer environments with few people, the study found droplets carrying the virus fell to the ground faster than in high-activity rooms where particles stayed suspended in the air, longer.

“To minimize the risk of infection, one should avoid spending extended periods in highly populated areas,” concluded Bazant and Bush in the study.

“One is safer in rooms with large volume and high ventilation rates. One is at greater risk in rooms where people are exerting themselves in such a way as to increase their respiration rate and pathogen output, for example, by exercising, singing, or shouting.”

Overall, mask-wearing was found to be the best way to limit both short-range and overall airborne transmission of COVID-19, followed by sufficient ventilation and filtration.

Bazant and Bush also created a website allowing users to use their formula to determine for themselves how best to avoid catching COVID-19 indoors.

On it, the researchers stated, “while public health organizations are beginning to acknowledge airborne transmission, they have yet to provide a safety guideline that incorporates all the relevant variables.”

6-feet rule virtually ineffective at preventing COVID spread indoors: MIT study - Saanich News
 

Messerschmitt

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Valneva’s shot is the only candidate in clinical trials in Europe that uses a tried-and-true vaccine technology involving an inactivated version of the whole virus it’s targeting. Inactivated vaccines — a century-old approach adopted for flu and polio — take a sample of the disease that has been killed and use it to stimulate an immune response without creating infection.

Now we're talking. Me, personally, I'd take this even if it's 50% effective, vs new tech that has never been used in humans and that has no track record for any future complications (currently all the data is for under a year), not to mention rushed to get it out there to deal with this whole mess. I've seen too many complications from all the big 4 vaccines that the media will never show. And I don't mean deaths, but paralysis and other scary complications.
 

PMedMoe

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Now we're talking. Me, personally, I'd take this even if it's 50% effective, vs new tech that has never been used in humans and that has no track record for any future complications (currently all the data is for under a year), not to mention rushed to get it out there to deal with this whole mess. I've seen too many complications from all the big 4 vaccines that the media will never show. And I don't mean deaths, but paralysis and other scary complications.
Fact or Fiction: Was the COVID-19 vaccine ‘rushed’ and the trials faked?

How did we develop a COVID-19 vaccine so quickly?

Debunking Common Myths About COVID-19 Vaccines

But, do tell about the many "scary" complications you have witnessed. Also, the J&J vaccine hasn't even been used in Canada yet (AFAIK).

Johnson & Johnson vaccine is coming to Canada

Not that I'm saying this new vaccine won't be a good one too, but you do realize they only started Phase 3 clinical trials this month.
 
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suffolkowner

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Fact or Fiction: Was the COVID-19 vaccine ‘rushed’ and the trials faked?

How did we develop a COVID-19 vaccine so quickly?

Debunking Common Myths About COVID-19 Vaccines

But, do tell about the many "scary" complications you have witnessed. Also, the J&J vaccine hasn't even been used in Canada yet (AFAIK).

Johnson & Johnson vaccine is coming to Canada

Not that I'm saying this new vaccine won't be a good one too, but you do realize they only started Phase 3 clinical trials this month.




Now we're talking. Me, personally, I'd take this even if it's 50% effective, vs new tech that has never been used in humans and that has no track record for any future complications (currently all the data is for under a year), not to mention rushed to get it out there to deal with this whole mess. I've seen too many complications from all the big 4 vaccines that the media will never show. And I don't mean deaths, but paralysis and other scary complications.

I think we need to distinguish between adverse reactions to potentially damaging vaccine components and the peculiarities of an indiviuals immune response.

I'd probably rate my vaccine preference overall and not just the covid-19 options

1. RNA (Pfizer, Moderna)
2. recombinant virus (AstraZeneca, J&J)
3. attenuated or inactivated virus (Sinovac)
4. protein subunit (Novavax)

I think there is huge potential in the RNA vaccine/delivery going forward.
 

Messerschmitt

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I think we need to distinguish between adverse reactions to potentially damaging vaccine components and the peculiarities of an indiviuals immune response.

I'd probably rate my vaccine preference overall and not just the covid-19 options

1. RNA (Pfizer, Moderna)
2. recombinant virus (AstraZeneca, J&J)
3. attenuated or inactivated virus (Sinovac)
4. protein subunit (Novavax)

I think there is huge potential in the RNA vaccine/delivery going forward.
I agree. But AFAIK RNA was never used in humans, and because of COVID and how fast something was needed, it was never tested in mice either. Over time I do agree it can potentially be much better, but as of right now, personally I would take the #3 due to it's track record in all other vaccines.

AFAIK, only the Chinese made one for COVID, so I'm really happy that someone in the western countries is now proceeding into this.
 

PMedMoe

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I agree. But AFAIK RNA was never used in humans, and because of COVID and how fast something was needed, it was never tested in mice either.
I already posted about the speed with which the vaccines came out.

Pfizer and Moderna did not skip animal trials

"Due to the urgent need for a vaccine in a surging pandemic, Pfizer and Moderna were given approval to simultaneously test their vaccines on animals while they were conducting Phase 1 trials on humans. The vaccines were tested on mice and macaques."

Immune Responses Induced by mRNA Vaccination in Mice, Monkeys and Humans

"This vaccine was also found to be highly immunogenic in mice and hamsters and induced strong neutralizing titers and full protection"

AFAIK, only the Chinese made one for COVID, so I'm really happy that someone in the western countries is now proceeding into this.
AstraZeneca COVID‐19 Vaccine (manufactured by AstraZeneca) and COVISHIELD (manufactured by Serum Institute of India) are recombinant vaccines developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University. AstraZeneca is a British-Swedish multinational pharmaceutical and biotechnology company with its headquarters at the Cambridge Biomedical Campus in Cambridge, England.

The scientists who developed the Pfizer/BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine are a Turkish-German power couple, scientists Ugur Sahin and Ozlem Tureci. And they did so in Germany.

The Moderna COVID‑19 vaccine was developed by Moderna (a US company), the US National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) a US Health and Human Services office.



You still haven't mentioned the complications you've witnessed. but I'm starting to wonder where you're getting your information from.

I got the A-Z shot, but I would have preferred Pfizer or Moderna due to their higher efficacy rate. However, now is not the time for people to be picking and choosing. The faster we get people vaccinated, the faster we achieve herd immunity and hopefully significantly slow down the spread of COVID.
 

QV

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So I'm curious how Texas, Florida, and South Dakota are doing. Shouldn't they be a complete disaster by now?
 
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